Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.226.147.190

Forum Moderators: LifeinAsia & httpwebwitch

Message Too Old, No Replies

How to deal with lazy clients?

Clients that never call or take their sweet time

     

JPcinemamaster

7:07 pm on Jul 9, 2010 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Hello,
I am not sure if this happens to you guys but I noticed that many potential clients that I have, at first at least, get very interested for my services. But then they get lazy, never call you back, take forever to provide content and you have to chase them around to get their businesses. Does this happen to you guys? What can I do to make these potential clients know that we are legit and want to provide the best web services?

Itís pretty annoying to be calling them many times a day. Do you guys have like a business strategy to deal with indecisive clients?

Thank you

LifeinAsia

7:48 pm on Jul 9, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator lifeinasia is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Fire them. In many (most?) cases, being delinquent in giving you content carries over to being delinquent in paying you. Instead of spending your time and energy on them, devote that time/energy to getting better clients.

If you do keep them, make sure you factor in an extra "aggravation" surcharge on your fees to them.

willybfriendly

8:38 pm on Jul 9, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Better than firing them (although that is always a good option to hold in reserve) require 30-50% payment at the time the contract is signed, another 25-30% at the time the design is approved by the client, and final payment before taking the site live.

Clients that already have significant skin in the game are usually far more responsive. If they aren't, and your contract is written correctly, then you can fire them - and you have already been compensated for what time you have spent.

BeeDeeDubbleU

7:23 am on Jul 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member beedeedubbleu is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



JPcinemamaster is talking about potential clients as opposed to actual clients. This makes the situation a wee bit different.

What I do...

As I don't do any advertising outside of my website all of my clients come to me either through my online enquiry form or via referals. My enquiry submission asks them if they want me to call them. If they say no then I don't as there seems to be an extraordinary number of time wasters looking for websites!

I respond appropriately by email requesting more information or if they have provided enough info I tell them roughly what they can expect to pay. I also ask them if this is within their budget. If they do not respond I contact them again in about two weeks time to jog them. If they ignore this I drop them into the can.

BeeDeeDubbleU

7:25 am on Jul 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member beedeedubbleu is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Willybfriendly I should perhaps have added that I also require a 50% upfront payment and my T and Cs include a clause that says that all the information required to complete the website must be provided before I start the work.

This does not eliminate all problems but it certainly helps.

jedz

6:02 am on Jul 12, 2010 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



If the potential client, gave their interest on the product/services that you're offering but still they haven't 'pay'/ close the deal / still no response after several follow ups. I assure you that they got other providers.

If your actual client, do not contact you nor answering your emails after the services that you have provided, mate.. move on and look for more projects..You should strictly follow 50% upfront..

Mark_A

7:49 am on Jul 12, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I don't do this kind of work anymore but I used to charge 40% at the start, 30% on delivery of templates and page design, and then 30% on completion. That tended to sort out who was serious and who not.

Plus, yes potential clients can seem lazy, except when they suddenly decide they want it and they want it yesterday! This usually of course coincides with you working on another important client. I think that is called sod's law!

And that was usual for clients of mine, yes they want to do the work with you, yes they will get started soon, delay and delay and eventually up to 12 months later it is all of a sudden blindingly urgent, it has to be done yesterday, it does not matter what else you are doing at the time!

incrediBILL

8:11 am on Jul 12, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Do you guys have like a business strategy to deal with indecisive clients?


Yes. Charge 50% up front to start the project and hope you never hear from them again! :)

Give them deadlines for submitting content and when they miss those deadlines tell them their project is stalled and YOUR delivery end date has moved based on undeliverable content.

Always put that in the contract as well, that the project end date is contingent on the client also delivering all content that you need from them and any delays on their part will physically push the final delivery date accordingly.

CYA

JPcinemamaster

3:13 am on Jul 19, 2010 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Is it possible to charge them %40 up front and if they don't deliver the content they promised (let's say in 10 business days) we terminate the contract with no refunds?
Is it legally possible?
Thanks

httpwebwitch

5:53 pm on Jul 19, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator httpwebwitch is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



JPcinemamaster:
terminate the contract with no refunds ... Is it legally possible?


IANAL. But deadlines are a common feature in contracts. Much sillier things than that are enforceable, so why not deadlines. I've signed my share of them where there was a "finished by this date or you don't get paid" clause. Make sure there is no ambiguity in the definition of "finished".
 

Featured Threads

Hot Threads This Week

Hot Threads This Month