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what's French for "bed and breakfast"

... bonjour mes amis francophones!

     

PatrickDeese

2:37 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Hi -

My translator is stuck on translating the term "bed and breakfast" into French.

Some website for a B&B in Quebec used "Cafe et Couette"

In France, the only site I could find easily that was in both French and English suggested that "gîtes" was the term for bed and breakfast.

My inclination would be towards "petits hôtels".

So, mes frères, any better suggestions?

PhraSEOlogy

3:18 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Logement de lit et de petit déjeuner

is the google translation.

Which means (housing and small dinner) - I think?

louponne

3:19 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



A "gîte" is a rental, can be a house or an apartment, is usually pretty simple, and almost always in the country.

A "chambre d'hôte" is a room in a house almost always with breakfast and often with the possibilithy of having other meals, so comes closest to "bed and breakfast".

Another variation is "maison d'hôte" for a house and "table d'hôte" for meals.

Simplest way to check this sort of thing is to go to a dmoz category, and click on "other language" links. In this case, go to France, work your way down to a department, travel and tourism, lodging, b&b, and then click on the "French" link.

BTW, you should *always* use native language translators! And *never* trust google or other automatic translations.

PhraSEOlogy

3:27 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I have visitors from a spanish forum and I transalated my site using google - to see how it looked to them - the result was pretty funny and practically impossible to follow. I wonder what my spanish visitors think?

MonkeeSage

3:31 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



BTW, you should *always* use native language translators! And *never* trust google or other automatic translations.

A bit OT, but really funny...my mom was using Babelfish to translate a note into Spanish for our landscaper. She was trying to say "I appreciate all of your hard work, and I wanted to say thank you for the superb job you have done on our garden" -- it came out something to the effect of "It pleases me very much when you come near to me and speak greatly of your hard work at gardening."

I think my mom would definitely agree with you, louponne. ;)

Jordan

yves1

3:32 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Hi,
"Chambre d'hôtes" is probably the closest. Its word to word translation is guest house.

BTW, if you just say "bed and breakfast" in France, we'll (mostly) all get what you mean. Google as well: [google.fr...]

"Cafe et Couette" is pure Canadian French, nobody will get it in France.

So, mon ami, j'espère que ça t'aide ;-)

PatrickDeese

3:34 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I have visitors from a spanish forum and I transalated my site using google - to see how it looked to them - the result was pretty funny and practically impossible to follow. I wonder what my spanish visitors think?

I wouldn't bother with a google translation - the auto translators cannot pick out context, and apart from that they translate each word individually, which is why your suggestion going to be incorrect.

I live in Mexico, as a matter of fact, and can attest to the fact the autotranslators make quite of number of (potentially embarassing) mistakes.

louponne et yves1 merci for the suggestions. Totally slipped my mind to look in DMOZ.

Macguru

5:41 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member macguru is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Hi PatrickDeese,

Sorry I am late...

Yves came up with the best solution. There is no best way to translate it. There are many ways to tranlate it. Go for them all.

Another source is La Toile du Québec.

[toile.com...]

You will find directories of B&B there. I would go for translating into anything you can find there, if you can pop that many pages.

Most of my referals are for "b et b cityname", "gites du passant cityname" and "Bed and breakfast cityname". (proper spelling for "gites" is "gîtes" but no one types it)

I dont have much referrals for "café et couette" even if I have a few clients for it.

PatrickDeese

11:36 pm on Aug 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



my mom was using Babelfish to translate a note into Spanish for our landscaper

I can top this, a mexican client at my internet cafe had to translate a paragraph from Spanish to English for her English homework and just 'fished it.

She wrote:

"Mi mama se llama Guadalupe"

(my mother's name is Guadalupe)

However, the Fish translated it as:

"My breast is called Guadalupe"

--

This is because the young lady neglected to include the grammatically correct accent mark in "mamá", therefore the fish very correctly translated the unaccented version as that which babies suckle.

If your foreign language customers are worth something to you, translate it. If you have a huge site, at least translate the highlights - ie the bestsellers of your widget catalog, the ordering page, contact page, etc.

louponne

9:00 am on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



That's a pretty funny example, PatrickDeese :))

But I find that it's a lot simpler than all the funny and crazy examples. If you want foreign customers, you have to look serious and reputable to them. If your text is not correctly translated, you won't. So saving money on translation is losing customers. So it's not saving money, it's losing money!

Sinner_G

9:09 am on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Another source is La Toile du Québec.

I wouldn't trust any site from Quebec to get a translation that would be understood in France (or Belgium or Switzerland for that matter). There are lots of words used in Quebec that we in Europe don't understand.

And I'm not sure everybody in France would understand 'bed and breakfast'. Don't want to generalise, but the French are not noted for their ability to learn languages.

louponne

2:08 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Don't want to generalise, but the French are not noted for their ability to learn languages.

uh-huh. I'm glad you don't want to generalise.
Well, in any case, the question here isn't whether people who don't speak English as their mother-tongue *understand* English, it's whether you want to attract visitors to your site, right? You can't really expect people to learn English to make you happy, and you certainly can't expect people to use english words on search engines to make you happy!

bcolflesh

2:17 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I wouldn't trust any site from Quebec to get a translation that would be understood in France (or Belgium or Switzerland for that matter). There are lots of words used in Quebec that we in Europe don't understand.

That's an understatement, I'm not sure why Quebecois claim to speak French at all - no one in France has any idea what they are babbling about!

Macguru

2:36 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member macguru is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



We should be carefull not to slide off topic here folks... lets remember that WebmasterWorld is an international forum for advanced web professionals...

La Toile du Québec was offered as 'another source' on top of ODP. I believe the tourism industry, and many others, can benefit from digging deeper in cultural differences.

My point was to do a good market study in order to respond to demand. That's all. ;)

Sinner_G

2:50 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I'm not sure why Quebecois claim to speak French at all

They do, but it is mainly another direction taken since the splitting of the languages when France sold Canada to the Brits.

I just wanted to make sure PatrickDeese wouldn't be made fun of if using such a term as 'Cafe et Couette' (not sure French even know what a couette is, although we use the word in Switzerland) or 'Gites du passant'. That is if his translation is aimed at French people and not Canadians. From what I gather, Canadians are more likely to understand the European french version as the other way round, so if it targets all french speakers, take the European version.

In this case, I would advise 'Chambres d'hôtes'. As I said in my previous post, I don't think that many French people would understand Bed&Breakfast. But as always it is different depending on what kind of people are the target.

<added>Is there any reason I missed for this thread to be in European Search Engines and not in Foo?</added>

Macguru

3:06 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member macguru is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I am pretty sure that if PatrickDeese lives in Mexico, "los tabarnacos" are part of the target. ;)

This is why I believe la Toile du Québec is also relevant for him...

>>when France sold Canada to the Brits.

Herr, and when was that?

louponne

3:28 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



End of the Seven Years' War in 1763. Well, 'sold' may not quite be the word. Weren't we supposed to avoid getting off-topic, MacGuru? ;-)

Macguru

3:40 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member macguru is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Fer sure louponne! ;)

I also disagree with the word 'sold', wich could bring us back to topic : words.

PatrickDeese, wich is (are) your targeted market(s)? In tourism, I think the wider, the better.

glengara

3:55 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



*what's French for "bed and breakfast*
Voulez-vous couchez avec moi ce soir?

PatrickDeese

4:01 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



PatrickDeese, wich is (are) your targeted market(s)? In tourism, I think the wider, the better.

My target is anyone who speaks French - and wants info on my website's region.

I think I am going to solve the problem by having a paragraph that leads to the "Chambre d'Hote" page that says something like (in French):

Whether you call it a "cafe et couette", a "Chambre d'Hote", a "B et B" or "Bed et Breakfast", [$destination] has a wide variety of to choose from.

Of course, each different term is a link right to the chambre-d-hote.htm page.

--

FWIW, mostly we get French Canadians. I am trying to change that.... bienvenue! ;)

louponne

4:02 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



uh-oh

Marcia

4:14 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I've heard that 9 out of 10 Frenchmen can't read or write Perl.

louponne

4:21 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



[accent="French" mode="very thick"]But of course we know Perls, Marcia - Perls are for Gerls![/accent]

Sinner_G

7:17 pm on Aug 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Perls are for Gerls

Well, there's also a saying in french involving pearls and pigs. :)

Sorry, off topic I know, but couldn't resist.

yves1

1:58 pm on Aug 22, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



>>PatrickDeese
In your paragraph in French don't write "Bed et Breakfast" but "Bed and Breakfast" and "Bed & Breakfast". We (French) don't translate the "and" into "et" when using this locution.

I would also add "B & B" and "B&B" to the list.

In case you did not already do it, have a look at overture keywords: [inventory.fr.overture.com...]

PatrickDeese

3:01 pm on Aug 22, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Yves - merci - that is great, I just discovered that there is an "es" inventory as well, which is certain handy since most of my promotion is done for "Mexique".

offrench

10:09 am on Aug 25, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Hi, Patrick

I'm a bit late on this thread, but wanted to add something.
I had a chat one day with someone from a French organization called "Gites de France" and this person told me that the expression "Café couette" was the brand name of a competitor.

Here's a page (in French) showing the different brands and organizations in this domain:
[perso.wanadoo.fr...]

Anyway "café couette" is not used much and not very well known. Only 1790 results in Google whereas there are close to 100 000 results for "chambres d'hotes" (searches limited to French websites in Google).

DeepIndex

5:25 am on Sep 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Hi there,

best words for bed and breakfast is not "voulez vous coucher avec moi" but "Gites" and "Chambres d'hotes" ...

I would go for Gites which is more requested on DeepIndex and also on an other tourisme engine ...

Best regards

louponne

6:06 am on Sep 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



To repeat my first post, Gites" and "Chambres d'hotes" are not the same thing!

fr_cnx

2:00 pm on Sep 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I was in Brittany the last week
they use "gites" for a rented house or flat on a daily basis
and "chambres d'hotes" for the B&B
hope this helps!
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