Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.167.252.62

Forum Moderators: bill

Message Too Old, No Replies

Anti-Virus software that accepts gzip encoding?

     
11:59 pm on Nov 1, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator ergophobe is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Last I looked, most anti-virus software (and definitely Norton/McAfee/Symantec) would strip the accept encoding header thereby preventing most servers from sending compressed content.

Since I'm on a slow connection a lot and even worse, it's satellite, which means high latency so fewer packets is much better than more packets, I'd really rather make my computer do that work.

Any suggestions for anti-virus software that you've tested and demonstrated to not interfere with accept-encoding header?

BTW, if you're not sure this applies to you look at the headers Firefox sends using LiveHTTP headers. This verifies the browser is sending the right headers.

Then go to
[whatsmyip.org...]
which will often show you that those headers do not make it to the server.
12:58 pm on Nov 3, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator coopster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Zone Alarm AV uses Kaspersky and it works as you wish. I believe the feature you are looking for is called real-time protection or on-demand, on-access ... pick one. Wiki explains it a bit: [en.wikipedia.org...]
6:28 pm on Nov 4, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator ergophobe is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Nope... I have that feature. It's what screws everything up.

Most AV software strips or mangles the Accept-Encoding HTTP header so that no matter how your browser is requesting the page and how the server is serving it, you will never get the gzipped version.

If the web dev is really savvy, she can use the Google technique
* if there is no cookie, set one saying there is no gzip
* force delivery of a gzipped javascript file that, if interpreted correctly, sets a cookie saying the browser can accept gzipped content. If it truly doesn't, then nothing happens
* if the client has the right cookie, send gzipped content no matter what the Accept-Encoding header says.

[stevesouders.com...]

Of course, .000001% of websites are doing this. So b/c I'm running AV software, I'm not getting gzipped content.

Not a problem on a high-speed connection, but when I'm on my high-latency satellite connection, it would speed things up a fair bit.

Of course, what would be really handy would be if the HTTP spec allowed me to *send* gzipped content for all post headers/data. Since the upload speed is the real bottleneck, that's the killer.
10:33 pm on Dec 1, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator coopster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Nope... I have that feature. It's what screws everything up.


I have a Win Laptop running ZA AV w/Kaspersky. I checked it right before posting just to be certain it was working on that machine. It was, as expected.

Most AV software strips or mangles the Accept-Encoding HTTP header so that no matter how your browser is requesting the page and how the server is serving it, you will never get the gzipped version.


I'm getting the compressed version. Win 7, 64-bit, is the OS on that machine BTW.
 

Featured Threads

Hot Threads This Week

Hot Threads This Month