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Percentage of long tail searches?

     

Makaveli2007

1:12 am on Jul 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Everybody is saying optimize for the long-tail b/c less competitive and higher conversion rates. Sounds great.

However, I've also heard (from a web analytics perspective) that the main 15-20 keywords bring in most of the traffic (ok 15-20 probably contains a couple of long-tail searches).

What I'm wondering is this:

Say a build a website on how to learn Widgets and want to focus on the keywords "learn Widgets" and "Widget language". Or well not focus on them, but that's where I want to start and go into long-tail keywords (the top of my "keyword pyramide")..as obviously trying to rank for a term such as "Spanish" would be hard and probably not yield great conversions.

Would you expect that if the site is in the top 10 for those 2 phrases that all other long-tail phrases combined would far outnumber these 2 keywords?

I'm wondering if this is different from keyword to keyword. I assume for a field such as "Widget language" or "learn Spanish" there might be a disproportionally high number of long-tail searches, whereas for another field a few main keywords might get most of the traffic.

What do you guys think about this? How many percent of searches will usually come from all the long-tail searches combined in comparison to say the 2 main keyword phrases - do they usually outnumber them?

And does it differ a lot depending on the field/keywords?

[edited by: mona at 2:15 pm (utc) on July 11, 2007]
[edit reason] no specific kws - thx! [/edit]

treeline

3:34 am on Jul 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Taken together, phrases like:

learn Widget new york
Widgets lessons in atlanta
learn Widget chicago
california Widget teachers
where to learn Widgets
learn Widget texas

Could top the traffic from your top 2 phrases. Many searchers have learned that something that's available everywhere is useless to search for generically. They want an answer close to them. If you're everywhere, look "local" everywhere. People who know what they're looking for are also closer to buying.

If I need to find a hardware store, I don't search for 'hardware store' since the odds of finding anything I can get to are nil.

[edited by: mona at 2:16 pm (utc) on July 11, 2007]
[edit reason] no specific kws - thx! [/edit]

mona

2:32 pm on Jul 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Hi, Makaveli2007.
How many percent of searches will usually come from all the long-tail searches combined in comparison to say the 2 main keyword phrases - do they usually outnumber them?

And does it differ a lot depending on the field/keywords?

Ya, it really does differ on the field/keyword. That's why theming works so well. You optimize for the main KW phrase, and to support this phrase, you optimize for all the related longer phrases. This way you are covered for both.

But keep in mind that many of your visitors will come from keyword phrases that you never even thought of. That's why Content is King. I know it's an overused phrase, but it's true. More words/pages on you site = the more possible keyword phrases for people to find you! This post is old, but it touches on the numbers of an ecommerce site I used to work on.

Optimizing for obscure keyword phrases [webmasterworld.com]

The top five keyword phrases referred 38,000 visitors to the site. The rest referred 64,000 visitors. But 47,000 of the referrers to the site came from keyword phrases that were searched for only one time. So while the main keyword phrases are important 38K referrers the obscure search phrases add up to the tune of 64K visitors.

Makaveli2007

6:20 pm on Jul 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



But keep in mind that many of your visitors will come from keyword phrases that you never even thought of.

That's basically what I was wondering about with the whole long-tail thing. thx.

@the first poster (sorry Im in a rush and i can only see mona's post now ;(:

What you say is obviously true, but it's a regional/local thing. If we're talking e-books/affiliate products or services the regional thing goes away pretty much.

Makaveli2007

4:56 pm on Jul 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



anyways..great to hear this (just read the thread you linked to mona). I did know that long-tail searches converted way better than generic searches, etc. however when doing keyword research/trying to come up with an idea for a new site Ive been focussing too much on the keyword tools.

As in..I look up the terms and see ok this term gets xyz searches this gets xyz searches,... but there are hardly any long-term searches that get a decent volume so maybe this topic isn't worth it..judging by the keyword volumes on a variety of keyword tools.

But now, Im pretty sure that if I can rank for a ..well not generic term, but a specific high-volume term (or two or three) and optimize everything else, etc. I can also expect to get tons of sweet long term searches that will be better converting even if they dont show up on the keyword tools.

ahh..let me try to rephrase it: Before this thread I was looking at keyword tools like this: 3 high volume terms for this niche, but SO few long-tail searches. Will it actually be worth to rank for the somewhat generic (2 or 3 word phrases;NOT totally generic ;)) terms if there are so few long-tail searches on the keyword tools?...b/c those main terms might not even convert well..

but I assume if one is able to rank for rather generic terms and optimizes all other pages, too..and adds pages for terms one sees in the log files later..(and thus basically dominates the niche) one should be able to get a lot of long-tail searches - that convert well - on top of that..even if they dont show up in the keyword tools so much.

Agree or disagree?^^

 

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