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What's your favorite source editor?

     

sgietz

3:37 pm on Nov 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I started coding with FrontPage many moons ago. Primarily because it came with Office. It was already on the computer, so the logical step was to use it. I transitioned to Dreamweaver after a while and really enjoyed it.

But simply designing websites wasn't enough for me. I wanted the pages to do things, so I learned ASP and then ASP.NET. I continued using Dreamweaver, but because of its poor support for .NET I eventually switched to Visual Studio, and that's my editor of choice. I can honestly say that the source view is open about 98% of the time. Sure, coding by hand takes more time, but it's cleaner and let's admit it, it's actually fun for us nerds.

The worst editor I ever had to use was NetObjects Fusion 7. That was installed and extensively used by my predecessor at the company I currently work for. What a nightmare! It took quite some time to convert all that over to a file structure that actually made sense. Not to mention cleaning up the atrocious code that was generated.

What editor are you guys using? Do any of you use WYSIWYG programs? What's the worst editor you ever had to work with?

piatkow

4:59 pm on Nov 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



Both for personal sites and at work I largely use Notepad, simply because it is there.

Worst are the "save as html" functions in the various MS Office products. I used to have to drop a spreadsheet onto a web page every couple of months and the acres of redundant code generated were a pain.

rocknbil

9:24 pm on Nov 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rocknbil is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Hands down, HomeSite 5.2, hand coder here and never found anything else that toes the line. If you have DW on disk, it will be in the extras directory.

However, as a Windows server developer (and likely to stay that way judging by your other thread) HomeSite may not work for you. I mean, it will, it supports .asp/.net files for developing and error checking them, but it's designed to manage a lot of things you will rarely ever need, and is definately not a WYSIWYG program. You're probably using the best solution for .net coding.

Worst experience . . . haha . . . see first sentence of your O.P. :-)

MatthewHSE

9:33 pm on Nov 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



EditPadPro here - Kompozer for the rare occasions when I feel lazy and decide to go WYSIWYG...only to realize that, no, plain text is *still* the laziest way out for me! ;)

D_Blackwell

12:56 am on Nov 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Both for personal sites and at work I largely use Notepad, simply because it is there

Can't beat Notepad for clean and simple. I hand-code everything.

I've got TextPad on hand for validation errors and spell checking. I suppose that I could use it exclusively, but have always coded in Notepad. I do run final product through TextPad for spell checking.

Been doing it long enough that validation is mostly just a double-check. Not many errors to be found. However, if I didn't close a <div> on line 300, TextPad has line number option, so I use it.

My version of TextPad is probably five years old, so probably even better now. There are a lot of good hand-coding editors available with handy 'bells and whistles', but that don't mess with your code as with WYSIWYG. That is, they do what they are told (or allowed) and nothing more - just like a good text editor should.

icedowl

3:46 am on Nov 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I used to use NetObjects Fusion, versions 4 thru 9. Version 9 was fairly decent as far as the generated code is concerned but those early versions were pretty ugly. I stopped using it and switched to hand coding in notepad several years ago. I just like having complete control over the code these days.

Ahkamden

3:23 pm on Nov 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



For those using Notepad, you may want to check out Notepad++. Open source and makes for clean coding. Also gives you line numbers, and when you save as a format(html for example), it gives color mark ups and collapsable code between tags.

StoutFiles

3:38 pm on Nov 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



I too use NotePad for a lot, but when I do break away from it to use editors like NotePad, PSPad, UltraEdit, etc...I find that page tabs, color differentiation, and being able to go back more than one step are incredibly useful.

creative craig

3:49 pm on Nov 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Editpad - simple enough for day to day use but has a huge wealth of features if required.

If I am doing some real quick editing then I sometimes use Notepad, but not very often.

lavazza

3:52 am on Nov 14, 2009 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Any plain text editor - as long as (in descending order);
  • it is free (as in lunch)
  • has 'user options' for syntax highlighting on all the popular languages and CSS, etc
  • opens multiple files in tabs
  • has line numbering
  • supports folding
  • dreamcatcher

    9:02 am on Nov 15, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member dreamcatcher is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



    PSPad is my editor of choice. If I need to handle large data files then I use Vim.

    dc

    Jonesy

    2:06 pm on Nov 21, 2009 (gmt 0)

    5+ Year Member



    kwrite in adjunct with KompoZer

    Jonesy

    vero

    9:37 pm on Nov 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

    5+ Year Member



    UltraEdit by IDM is my favorite. It's text-based, like Notepad - but Notepad on steroids.

    Lets you create macros, templates, custom taglists, & much more. It also comes with a free version of UltraCompare that lets you compare files when you can't find the one line that's making the second version mess up. Very affordable, under $50 and for me worth every dime.

    The company also makes UEStudio, which has additional features for building applications, but I haven't tried that one.

     

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