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What does EU GDPR means for Adsense?

Question about GDPR and Adsense.

     
5:38 pm on Mar 24, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Question: What does EU GDPR means for Adsense?

Most of the Adsense income is from interest based ads. Will this be affected by the EU GDPR?
I'm concerned because today with the latest update for my Android Phone, I got asked for permission related to interest based ads. (Maybe it is because I did disable it before. This is to see the normal ads on my pages with Adsense. But I'm still concerned.)
1:46 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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@Cralamarre with you 100%. I'm also looking into members only content as I'm sure that's the way to go.
2:55 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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See what they do here:
[healthline.com...]

Select 'No'
3:32 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Interesting. Maybe if more sites start doing something similar, people will quickly learn that no cookies = no websites.
3:36 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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People who decline cookies and block ads should be banned from accessing the internet.
3:44 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Or at the very least given a choice. Allow ads and view the content for free, or pay for a membership to view the content without ads. Or, choose neither and go somewhere else, as "somewhere else" becomes harder and harder to find.

My nephew told me he uses an ad blocker, so I told him that I hope the place he works at stops paying him. He didn't like that. I didn't care.
4:47 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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See what they do here:
[healthline.com...]

Select 'No'


What are they doing there? I went to the page and saw nothing unusual.
5:03 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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@azlinda You need to view it from the EU or use a proxy server.
5:16 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Oh, okay. Thanks. I'll do that.
5:24 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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I just used Opera's VPN to view it. That's a great popup they use.
6:17 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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I'm glad that May 25 came and went without incident, because it seems that now we have time to see what everyone else is doing and make more informed decisions. It looks like the most popular solution is to leave personalized ads turned on, and to simply state in the consent banner that by continuing to use this site, you agree to it. Tell visitors how to disable cookies in your privacy policy, which they won't bother doing, and leave it at that. Why would anyone have a problem with that solution?
6:22 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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I never got that health site pop-up with FF, only with Chrome, odd.

I had a few day dip with adsense (probably more due to UK/US holidays), now right back to where I was before. I have PA's turned off for EU and as long as my stats hold up, I will leave it like that, I don't want to rock the boat if my numbers are OK.
6:25 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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People who decline cookies and block ads should be banned from accessing the internet.

This is up to each web publisher, to decide who can access his site or not. It's easy to detect if cookies are disabled, as well as ad blockers. If you are not (yet) banning these users, ask yourself why. If you can't find a legitimate reason , then go ahead and ban them.
9:34 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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>>>
People who decline cookies and block ads should be banned from accessing the internet.
<<<

I beg to differ. Rather companies, who cannot do without cookies or ads, shall set up a commercial web, like the TV stations who broadcast advertisments the whole day. Then the people who want advertises can go there and those who don't go here.

Being a publisher in the web for more than 20 years, I see it this way: If you want to (or need to) sell your content, open a members paying site, if you want to publish articles in the web for free, then do so.

I see so many websites who are nothing more than MFA sites with the 36th copy and rewrite of content that someone else published once, or that has been obtained for free - or those with just a few (key)words and nothing of real value in it. If all those sites were gone tomorrow, not a single word of valueable content would be lost.

On the other hand, if one has so valueable or unique content that people will want to read and wouldn't stand it not being able to read it (however, only very, very few content would classify as such), he probably would have no problem at all to get a membership site up and running.
9:38 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Actually many big websites, including Youtube, doesn't ask about personalising cookies. And in videos i just see personalised ads.

I think we just over-hyped this. Google has to react on GDPR, so they give us solution to turn off / on personalised ads. But, he will not check if you use consenting right way. Maybe he can send you warning when somebody report your site, but that's all. Google just had to do something, just for public. So turn your personalised ads on and don't care about it. When u go throw websites, maybe 70 % publishers are using ads without consenting, sometimes there is no just classic cookie consent, still they are alive.

I know, it can look riscy, but same for another Google's requirements. When u have so big CTR, Google can suspend your account as well. And what is big CTR, he can actually do it on 7 % or 5 % and you can do nothing. Just create new company and sign up new account like many big publishers before.
10:00 pm on May 29, 2018 (gmt 0)

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On the other hand, if one has so valueable or unique content that people will want to read and wouldn't stand it not being able to read it (however, only very, very few content would classify as such), he probably would have no problem at all to get a membership site up and running.


Thanks for your opinion, which is just what it is. There are plenty of sites which offer valuable information and would not work on a membership model.
I have a site which gets over 200k pageviews on a good day. People want to see this on their mobiles when they are planning a day out. Why would people sign up to something, on the fly, when it would be easier for them to just go look at one of my many imitators...

Not really sure what your problem is with advertising - I use many websites that are largely, if not entirely funded by advertising. Yes, there's plenty of junk out there, but that's no excuse to throw the baby out with the bathwater...
3:40 am on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Maybe the EU will break apart before the next shoe drops or at least have larger issues on its plate than privacy concerns. Seems Italy's upcoming election is viewed as a referendum on the EU and the euro. Some are calling it an existential threat. [reuters.com ]
4:56 am on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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>>>
Not really sure what your problem is with advertising
<<<

My reply was to the sentence "people who decline cookies and block ads should be banned from accessing the internet."

The internet, namely the WWW, which is only one part of the classic internet, was originally not meant to be a shopping mall, but a place to share information quick and for free.
Do you remember how it was in the mid and end 90s, where lots of information became accessible in this acuality, or at all? The commercial entities used Compuserve, later AOL, both pay-for services and financed their operations with revenues generated from members visiting their sites.
Then in came the commerce on the webpages. More and more, until sometimes one saw more advertises than text on a page and the content on webpages made for content (MFC) became increasingly buried by websites made for advertises (MFA).
Yes, I am fully aware that some discovered by then the economic model of small publishers who thought they can shut out the middle man by placing direct advertises, first by selling advertises on their webpages themselves and placing them themselves eg. by using permanent banners or rotation scripts. On the other side of the fence were the "old timers" who kept publishing for the good of the community for free.
However, content was being ripped and/or automatically rewritten and for those, who did that, it was profitable enough by plastering the sites with ads, to do it in a big style, and so the search engines, who exploded in their growth, picked up more and more of these sites, to a degree, where original content publishers became less and less visible.
People started to avoid the ads, websites replied with putting up more ads in a more pestering way. And people avoided them more, only to be faced with websites who forced more upon them.
Where one could read an article of interest and concentrate on the content once, now they had to deal with blinking and jumping elements, with video and audio starting without warning or mercy for the viewers.
But that was not the end of it, because now came those for whom everything was commerce, namely selling goods and services locally, and personally. Now viewers were facing a whole new "experience", which advertisers threaten even to increase. The experience being that advertisers were not satisfied that you bought one washing machine, but having the opinion that you need, for weeks to come a lot more washing machines ... and whowing that to you. Or the experience that, when you walk through a town, ads popping up like "Visit my restaurant. NOW!" rather than "sit down on the park bench next street and enjoy the view".

Yes - some people love this "experience", they love to be "taken care of", because (naturally), everyone wants only their best (their money...). They love it when they are being profiled so that "someone" knows what they are supposed to need in this minute or day.
But there are others who did not like all of this, or even most of it, and those are using ad blockers, script blockers, they disallow positioning services when they do not need it, VPN - and a thousand more tactics to evade the, in the end, it comes to it, commercialism not only of their world, but of themselves.

Yes, I know, this is written dramatized, and it is simplified, and some elements, like profiling down to existential and highly sensitive data, but the reader gets the idea nevertheless. And, let me stress, not the advertises are the problem, but their number increase, their presence everywhere and everywhen and their increase in being forced upon someone.

And now, someone comes and says "what are you doing here? It is my godgiven right to force impose my advertises on you". What effect will it have? One of two: First, a more aggressive stance and resistance towards him - or he will be left alone and people go to walled gardens, where they might find out that they can find there not a lot less of what they were looking for, but without being stringed along and, in some cases, having to sell themselves for it. :-)
5:07 am on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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>>>
Maybe the EU will break apart before the next shoe drops or at least have larger issues on its plate than privacy concerns. Seems Italy's upcoming election is viewed as a referendum on the EU and the euro. Some are calling it an existential threat.
<<<

It is not just the EU, the whole world will change drastically within the next couple of years, and not for the better. There are significant economic and political turmoils coming up. Whether all countries or all politicians, and even more, all companies, will survive that, remains to be seen. But change is not always and per se a bad thing for people, because new opportunities and better chances will arise from it as well. Over all, I am quite positive about the future and thankful to be living in these interesting times. :-)
9:59 am on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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"Maybe the EU will break apart"

In which case, you'll have to deal with a whole load of different privacy laws from 28 different countries.

(Sure, some of them may prefer not to - but the EU isn't some independent entity, it's what comes from those member countries, many of which are still going to have the same views on privacy.)
11:46 am on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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There seems to be a new GDPR Troubleshooting section in AdSense.
[support.google.com...]

The Enforcement section is interesting. Sounds like Google is taking the GDPR seriously:
"If we identify a problem with your site’s compliance with our policy, our first step will be to contact you to try to remedy the issue. Our initial enforcement phase will focus on the presence of consent notices. We expect to begin testing for data flows in subsequent phases of enforcement."

At the very least, consent notices are now required by Google.
12:01 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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There seems to be a new GDPR Troubleshooting section in AdSense.

Still lot of "might", "should", "may"...

At the very least, consent notices are now required by Google.

Google knows it's in the target of the EU regulators, so they are showing their good will.

Web publishers should better adopt the proper behaviors, because Google is not going to mind scarifying some publishers, if it can protect their interests.

I just hope that this is not their AI which will review sites and find out if they are compliant or not.
12:12 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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And I have removed the consent. I believe Cralamarre is also not showing the consent at the moment?

Google could easily fix this problem by showing consent.
12:16 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Google could easily fix this problem by showing consent.

Yes, the same way they have the option to disable personalized ads for EU visitors, they could have had a similar option , to make that the adsense code is showing a consent itself. But, this would be too risky for Google. Because this would mean they are endorsing the responsibility of the compliance with the GDPR/ePrivacy directive. If their consent is considering not compliant, it will be Google's fault... see? If it's a publisher implements a consent which is not fully compliant, Google can blame the publisher.

Now, was is still unclear, is that, the cookie set by non personalized ads, seems not to collect any personal information, or tracking data. So, if this is true, there is not even the need of a consent! But Google doesn't say it... so...

Also, Google had 6 years (at least 2 years since the final text was voted), to work with the EU regulators, to come up with a solution which would have been satisfying for both parts,...

The worse being that, all this will be reset when the ePrivacy Regulation will be enforced (supposedly later this year, or next year), and supposedly, the cookie consent, will not longer be the problem of web publisher. So it's an annoyance/risk now, but in one year, all might be different. (this is why the ePrivacy Regulation was initially scheduled to be enforced at the same time as the GDPR, which would make more sense.)
12:30 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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For those who are detecting themselves if a visitor (ip) is from the EU, I'd like to attract your attention, that beside the EU, this summer, Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway will also be covered by the GDPR.
12:36 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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@MayankParmar Yes, I've removed the consent banner, for now. But it sounds like Google is going to be testing for consent banners, so we may have no choice but to put it back.
1:20 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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But it sounds like Google is going to be testing for consent banners, so we may have no choice but to put it
back.


@Cralamarre what is that based on?
1:30 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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We expect to begin testing for data flows in subsequent phases of enforcement


Wonder what that means.
1:31 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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@bgweb It's based on the Enforcement section in the new GDPR Troubleshooting guide in AdSense:

"If we identify a problem with your site’s compliance with our policy, our first step will be to contact you to try to remedy the issue. Our initial enforcement phase will focus on the presence of consent notices. We expect to begin testing for data flows in subsequent phases of enforcement."
1:46 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Can't even find the GDPR Troubleshooting guide. Is there a link for it?
1:48 pm on May 30, 2018 (gmt 0)

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GDPR Troubleshooter:
[support.google.com...]
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