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Google Extends "Right to be Forgotten" Across Its Network for E.U. IPs

     
6:19 pm on Feb 11, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Just to make this clear. Right to be Forgotten, in the past, would only apply to E.U. versons of Google. For example, google.co.uk, google.fr, etc. However E.U. citizens could switch to, for example, Google.com, and still see the url. As it's going to be IP-based detection, now, whichever version of Google you're using will no longer show the url, but only if you're in one of the countries where the right to be forgotten is approved.

Got it?

Of course, there are still loopholes in that, but it's making it a little more effective.

Most people would be stumped, but WebmasterWorld members will know the way around this as it's purely IP based.

Tech giant Google says it will hide content removed under the "right to be forgotten" from all versions of the search engine when viewed from countries where removal was approved.

Under the "right to be forgotten" ruling, EU citizens may ask search engines to remove information about them.

Now, removed results will not appear on any version of Google. Google Extends "Right to be Forgotten" Across Its Network for E.U. IPs [bbc.co.uk]
8:15 pm on Feb 11, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Matt Cutts put out a funny tweet saying that his Google records show he has performed 80k+ searches but a lot of those were for things like 'buy viagra' and 'mesothelioma' while he was researching spam. My question, how will Google remember how many searches he has done in one country and forget in another? The answer is they won't. Whatever they decide to show, or not show, no information is forgotten.

So since this is purely based on access, and not actual data retention, there is NO WAY they will be able to conceal that data from someone who really wants it(see:NSA taps into Google nodes). So long as it exists there is a way, period. Google's is also not the only search engine, there are many others and there are sites who make copies upon copies of those results. The data cannot be "forgotten".

If it makes people happy to have something they don't like removed then Google has to comply with laws that cater to them but in 2016 that's a slippery slope since "professionally offended" is becoming a job description (a profitable one) for many.

I wonder how many searches I have made, Google knows(and the spam team can see it all).
7:25 pm on Mar 7, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Google has now confirmed this action will start next week.

Our current practice is to delist from all European versions of Google Search (like google.de, google.fr, google.co.uk, etc) simultaneously. Starting next week, in addition to our existing practice, we will also use geolocation signals (like IP addresses) to restrict access to the delisted URL on all Google Search domains, including google.com, when accessed from the country of the person requesting the removal. We’ll apply the change retrospectively, to all delistings that we have already done under the European Court ruling. Google adapts its approach to the European right to be forgotten [googlepolicyeurope.blogspot.co.uk]