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Google Decides What to Remove in the EU's "Right to be Forgotten"

     
10:39 am on May 14, 2015 (gmt 0)

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It can't all go to court, but it's clear that this must be taking up significant time and resources for any company faced with such a court ruling. Bing is not immune, either, and must have similar reviews in place for Europe.

The court gave little guidance on how requests should be decided, beyond saying that search results should be scrubbed if they include links to information that is inadequate, irrelevant, excessive or outdated.

That largely left Google on its own to figure out where to draw the line. The case, which established what is informally known as the “right to be forgotten,” has prompted more than 250,000 requests covering more than 920,000 links, as of Tuesday. Google has agreed to remove 35% of the links submitted and declined to remove 50%, with 15% still under review. Google Decides What Has the EU's "Right to be Forgotten" [wsj.com]


Earlier story Bing Now Accepting EU's "Right to be Forgotten" Requests [webmasterworld.com]
10:55 am on May 14, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Nightmare for all concerned.... as no matter what is done there will unhappy folks on either side. In this regard I'm glad I'm not an SE!
4:31 pm on May 14, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Nightmare for all concerned

My sympathy lies with the webmasters hosting the original content.

They have published material that is factually accurate, truthful, and entirely legal.

They are not required to remove it from their websites.

But the public is no longer allowed to find it.

...
10:06 pm on May 14, 2015 (gmt 0)

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It also means that if you want to research someone in Europe do not use a search engine that is affected by this: Yande or Google/Bing US?
11:58 am on May 15, 2015 (gmt 0)

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And that's why it's a farce, graeme_p, if you can find it by searching using other means.

Unilateral decisions such as this cannot be legislated for.

I guess the average person might have more trouble finding the stories, and that is probably the ill-informed officials that thought this was a good idea.
2:39 pm on May 15, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I often wonder how many legislators pass laws about matters they truly understand. Sometimes a 7-year old could predict the consequences more clearly.