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JavaScript Enabled

How many users aren't?

   
3:52 am on Jan 29, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Just how many users actually surf the net with JavaScript turned off anyway? My logs say a very low percentage, however most everytime JavaScript is discussed someone always feels the duty to interate about how it won't work for all the users who have JavaScript disabled.

It's widely agreed that some SE won't follow links using JS, so I use HTML from the index page to all sections of the site. But I do also use a JS dropdown navagation from those second level pages, in addition to HTML links. Also I rely heavily on optional JS pop-ups to add additional info relating to page subject matter.

And what would be the point of disabling browser JS anyway?

(edited by: keyplyr at 4:05 am (utc) on Jan. 29, 2002)

3:56 am on Jan 29, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



>And what would be the point of disabling browser JS anyway?

To stop the pop-ups!

4:02 am on Jan 29, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rcjordan is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



As with just about everything else, this seems to vary greatly with the type of audience. Tedster posted a great set of stats a few days ago that show 89% of the web users are js-enabled, up from 80% just a year ago. I deal in general interest sites likely to be accessed by the average JohnQ with whatever browser defaults he happens to have when he opens the box. I guesstimate that 93-95% of my visitors have js.

[w3schools.com...]

5:36 pm on Jan 31, 2002 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I find that most visitors do have JS enabled (80-90%), but you should still use it carefully. Visitors using assisitive technologies - screen readers especially - may have problems if a lot of your page is JS-driven.

They may not be able to access the information. Also, if you use a lot of JS menus, be sure to also include text links for those people using keyboard navigation.

This makes your site more accessible to people with disabilities AND people using PDA's and other new technologies.

Personally, I love JavaScript, but I've learned to reign it in a little. As accessibility becomes a bigger and bigger issue, too much JS can get you into trouble with both clients and visitors.