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Burn's night

How far afield is it honoured?

     
12:46 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I'm in England and have no Scottish blood but going to a Burn's night bash for a haggis and a wee dram or two.

Will you partake? if so where are you?

6:58 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I have Scottish blood, but sitting here in Idaho I need to ask 3 questions:
1) What is Burn's night
2) What is a haggis
3) How much is a wee dram

Obviously I haven't been back to the old country in a while..

Dayo_UK

7:11 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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1. Burns night - after Robert Burns.
2. Hmmmz - all/most the innards of a sheep in a skin made of sheeps stomach - I believe - Looks a bit like a big sasuage. Can taste nice - although I have had some very bad tasting ones.
3. A small amount - although I reckon Peewhy will have more than just a wee dram or two....

I am not Scottish - but I am sure a few Scots can fill you in with more details.

7:19 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Traditionally, a Haggis is made from the lung, liver, and heart of the sheep. These are mixed with oatmeal and a few spices and stuffed into the sheep's stomach.

[gumbopages.com...]

Sounds really appetizing ... think I'd need a few drinks too :)

7:35 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I have a little Scottish blood, but none of the culture. Burns night is known in Canada among bagpipe toting kilt boys and literary snobs. A mix best served with lots of alcohol.

They have a reputation for lifting sporans and tossing poles and saying "wee dram"

Most of you will know Robbie Burns as the author of "Auld Lang Syne", the song people sing on new year's eve that no one really understand the lyrics to.

[edited by: Woz at 11:49 am (utc) on Jan. 17, 2006]
[edit reason] Tidying up [/edit]

7:37 pm on Jan 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

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oh, yeah -
Burns night is also a night when people pull out Scottish accents no one knew they had. Most of them end up sounding like a drunken Mike Myers.
7:18 am on Jan 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

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The ritual was started by close friends of Burns a few years after his death in 1796 as a tribute to his memory. The basic format for the evening has remained unchanged since that time and begins when the chairman invites the company to receive the haggis.

Toast To The Lasses

The main speech is followed by a more light-hearted address to the women in the audience. Originally this was a thank you to the ladies for preparing the food and a time to toast the 'lasses' in Burns' life. The tone should be witty, but never offensive, and should always end on a concilliatory note.

The turn of the lasses to detail men's foibles. Again, should be humorous but not insulting.

It's light hearted fun and should be taken up by all!

8:47 pm on Jan 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

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An Englishman at one of these events always have to be on his guard not to come away with 3rd-degree Burns...

B^>

Rgds

Damon

11:39 pm on Jan 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I will be "kilted up" for my local Burns club (1884)supper on 28 Jan. Burns's birthday is 25 January and this marks what is known as the Burns "Season" in Scotland. Burns suppers are held from mid January through to mid February every year. Some popular speakers can be invited to attend six or more every year. (Free booze and food).

A while ago, I created the website for my local Burns club here in Alexandria, Scotland. Am I allowed to post the URL for this? (I am biased but I honestly believe that it is one of the most interesting sites on Burns on the Internet.

Burns night is also a night when people pull out Scottish accents no one knew they had.

We don't have to do this in Scotland ;)

(from Robert Burns Poem, Tam O' Shanter)
"But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flow'r, its bloom is shed; Or like the snow falls in the river, A moment white-then melts for ever; Or like the Borealis race, That flit ere you can point their place; Or like the Rainbow's lovely form, Evanishing amid the storm."

12:02 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Am I allowed to post the URL

Maybe not yerself ;) ..but in the interests of "Celtic solidarity" and promulgation of erudite sites of quality and recognised reference value to the subject [robertburns.org.uk]etc ..

I am biased but I honestly believe that it is one of the most interesting sites on Burns on the Internet.

Had a look ..'tis true otherwise I would not ha' posted a link to it ..

I'll nae be expectin' the five pound note as ye're Scots 'n' all ;)

( thus allying any mods worries 'bout collusion etc ;))

12:25 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I always celebrate when I find some haggis to eat in Canada

he is my multiple great uncle after all

12:42 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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All right ..I'll bite ..if it's clean enough to explain here ..what do your ancestors and sheep have in common? ;)

be prepared to be snipped ( maybe ;)..on account of our delicate sensibilities down here in foo ;)

9:10 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Many people do not realise just how much of a genius Robert Burns was. He was born into a poor smallholders family in 1759. Their home was basically a one room cottage that they shared with their animals. However his father made sure that Robert was well educated and he proved to be a good student. He became accomplished in Mathematics, French, Latin, History, Geography and many other subjects ni his short life.

Why is Burns so Important to many of we Scots?

(This is better answered in a quote from the World Burns Club Website).

"This is possibly the start of the difficult questions, particularly since Burns means so much, to so many people. In simplistic terms Robert Burns is most certainly one of the greatest poets who ever lived, and is hugely "important" for that reason alone……. but the issue is more complex.

Ask anyone outside Scotland, to name "Something representative of Scotland" and you will often hear things like - "St Andrew, Haggis, Whisky, Bagpipes, Braveheart (!), Kilts, Heather, Sean Connery (!) and of course Robert Burns"

Burns therefore has been adopted as a National Symbol of Scotland……which may in some ways seem appear strange. It must be recognised however (and this is a personal & perhaps controversial opinion) that the "Scots" as a nation, identify greatly with "Burns the Man" It could be argued that our cultural history & heritage has been founded on :- perpetual struggle, conflict, persecution, comradeship, nationalism, and great victories in the face of adversity…….all of which may have contributed to the modern day perception that Scots are :- rugged fighters, standing up for our rights, humorous, friendly, fiery yet gentle, passionate, and incredibly proud.

It can be seen therefore, that in many ways Robert Burns was and still is representative of these characteristics….. as a Poet, in his Writings, as a Person and as a Scot. His fame, as one of the world's greatest poets, makes these points more obvious.

It is no wonder that he has been adopted as Scotland's most "Famous Son"….. It is no wonder that the Scottish Nation has elevated his memory to being a Cultural Symbol of Scotland, …and it is no wonder that millions of Scots & descendants of Scots throughout the world recognise this too".

9:23 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Everyone loves Scotland, there is always a discussion about something Scottish and the fact that everyone from Scotland is proud to be Scottish - We all come and find these threads and post in them! :)

I found a wee story on the subject of Haggis, Im only posting a wee bit of it, but sure its not hard to find. I really love the story, makes me laugh!

A haggis is a small animal native to Scotland. Well when I say animal, actually it's a bird with vestigial wings - like the ostrich. Because the habitat of the haggis in exclusively mountainous, and because it is always found on the sides of Scottish mountains, it has evolved a rather strange gait. The poor thing has only three legs, and each leg is a different length - the result of this is that when hunting haggis, you must get them on to a flat plain - then they are very easy to catch - they can only run round in circles.

After catching your haggis, and dispatching it in time honoured fashion, it is cooked in boiling water for a period of time, then served with tatties and neeps (and before you ask, that's potatoes and turnips).

9:37 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I hunt haggis when they are in season (every month that has an "r" in it).

The story is mostly correct but the haggis, being birdlike, actually has two legs the larger of which being the only one that is any good for eating.

9:41 am on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I love Haggis, and Burn's night is great. It is celebrated at most British Embassies around the world and a few Scottish/British pubs etc.
1:47 pm on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I like haggis, and this seems to be the only time of year that we can get it ... unless of course we go to that famous scottish fastfood emporium McHaggis - supersize mine ...without fries.

They prefer the deep-fried Mars bar

11:04 pm on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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The interest in Robert Burns at this time of the year is amazing. My site was running at around 150 visitors per week. Last week this increased to 800 and this week looks like it will top 1000. The next couple of weeks will be the same then it will drop off again.

This boost in traffic is caused by people researching for all the Burns suppers that are held throughout the world. I get traffic from everywhere. I even got one from Mountain View this evening. Do Google have a Burns Supper?

(Perhaps they were looking for inspiration for a Burns theme for the logo on 25 January :o)

11:34 pm on Jan 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

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haggis, being birdlike,

Just noticed you neglected to mention the distinctive tartan plumage ( sort of spotted Mcleoud ) and the fact it lives exclusively on a diet of shortbread and whisky ..and lays golfballs..

The call of the bird a plaintive " ah'v no had ma tea " can be heard outside many a house or bar on the 25th ( breeding season from late Jan to Shrove Tuesday ) ..

A related species inhabits industrial areas ..plumage dull grey and olive drab ..and the call of "gieusacuggyweelyahuh" ..distinguishes the latter ..
..it also comes "pre fried" ..in lard filtered ( first pressings ) from non organically raised sporrans ..

It considers itself to be rather tough eating ..;)

Cross breeding of the two results in a "hughie" ..which nests in porcelain .

9:55 am on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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...here in Alexandria, Scotland

...where my younger brother was born..!

I was always told that the best time to hunt 'Haggi' (plural of Haggis?) is if there is a "braw bricht moonlicht nicht the nicht!"

Syzygy

10:25 am on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Small world!
10:36 am on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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It's quite funny, when I first posted this topic, it seemed to get a bit of a cold reception <snip>.

It has now gathered momentum and I no longer feel alone. It is bigger than I really thought.

My own personal Burn's Night is for no other reason than a 'men's night out', and plenty of whisky, a 'different' menu and good company. It just happens to be the first real socal event after Christmas.

I have another confession, I don't celebrate St.George's Day and I am a full blooded Englishmen ... but you can rest assured if I lived as an ex-pat in an other country, St.George would be on my social list!

[edited by: lawman at 10:42 am (utc) on Jan. 19, 2006]

12:54 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I have just been shopping and I bought a haggis. We are lucky here in Scotland. We get it all year round. :)

(Not good for the waistline so I don't eat it very often).

Regarding Burns, I had some modern books on him but when I was doing my club website I started buying old ones on eBay. I was amazed at what I managed to pick up. I have some books that are in great condition and written by people who lived at the same time as him. Very interesting.

2:07 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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It could be argued that our cultural history & heritage has been founded on :- perpetual struggle, conflict, persecution, comradeship, nationalism, and great victories in the face of adversity…….all of which may have contributed to the modern day perception that Scots are :- rugged fighters, standing up for our rights, humorous, friendly, fiery yet gentle, passionate, and incredibly proud.

You can see a lot of these traits from some of these posts!

3:40 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I'm waiting for the Haggis Liberation Front to hit the media.

I hear they are planning on a massive raid in the Lowlands. Their target is an isolated hovel that could be an undercover haggis breeder.

I think they will try to gather up the haggis from the wild and release them into captivity.

8:23 am on Jan 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

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'men's night out', and plenty of whisky

Plenty of whisky is an understatement. My best Haggis/Burns night was when I woke up next to an amazing lady with her fiance in the next room! LOL, terrible (perhaps) but true.

What surprised me the most was the the British Embassy served Black Label, now any who knows their whisky knows that it could have been a real Scotch.

But perhaps with the amounts served Single Quality Malts was not an option.

12:51 pm on Jan 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

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If anyone from the sun/news of the world reads WebmasterWorld you may just get a call and an offer about that post ;))
4:09 pm on Jan 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Our local village pub was under new management and the owner introduced himself and asked if I would like a short.

I said I'd like a nice single malt whisky please.

He said, "have a large one" and I replied " a large single malt would be very nice thank you "

He said ..."make up your mind, a single or a large?"

Any clues that our new landlord isn't a whisky person?

9:25 pm on Jan 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

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In Scotland we call a measure of whisky a "half". If you want a large one you ask for a double. He would have a problem with that, just go in and ask for a "half single malt" or a "double single malt".

(It all make perfect sense to Scottish bar people).

12:46 am on Jan 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Ask for half a single malt? I'd end up with £30 glass of whisky ..1/2 pint!, or even a Horlicks!
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