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Streaming Video from New Orleans

     
1:04 am on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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As the horrible situation gets worse in New Orleans, a local tv station (a CBS affiliate) is streaming live on the net.

Go Here:

[wwltv.com...]

6:07 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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That station has provided great streaming video. Last night they left their main studio in NO, and relocated to the transmitter and then to LSU in Baton Rouge.

They are providing better coverage than CNN or Fox, it is interesting to hear all the little details about the tragic situation.

They must be using a huge chunk of bandwidth.

6:31 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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> relocated

Ah, that would explain why some of the anchor "sets" look more like storage closets. I had thought it was a storm-damaged studio...

> little details

For the best news, you always go straight to the source. It's the little details and short human stories that put the flesh on the bones of the "big picture."

6:42 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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They must be using a huge chunk of bandwidth.

The media stream is proxied around the World by Limelight Networks, who seem to provide an Akamia style service specifically for this type of application.

The feed streams perfectly here at 141kbps, and a quick traceroute shows them peering with NTL somewhere the UK (probably Telehouse). I've no idea how the bandwidth bill is worked out commercially in this kind of setup.

6:43 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I was watching after they relocated and apparently the station manager was fearing for the safety of the staff as nightfall approached.

The transmitter studio had the logo taped to the wall. Reminded me of that WKRP episode.

6:44 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Thanks for the technical explanation. This site is great.
9:42 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Just been watching footage of people presently trapped in their homes. I find this disturbing.

From the comfort of my home I can watch people 1000s of miles away who are in desperate need of help now - 'Live'.

The information updates are obviously valuable; watching others suffer is troubling.

Perhaps I'm oversensitive.

10:21 pm on Aug 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

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No you are not oversensitive, just human.

It is so sad, and it has yet to start getting better.

I was thinking, if this were another country they would consider moving the city instead of rebuilding at the same location. I hope they do consider this option because it is only going to happen again. If global warming is real, it will happen sooner rather than later. But if global warming has not affected the hurricane cycle, it will still happen again in my lifetime.

Why they would rebuild a major city below sea level seems insane to me.

1:27 am on Sept 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Why they would rebuild a major city below sea level seems insane to me.

Why not? Large parts of the Netherlands are under sea level and they didn't had any major floodings since 1953,so it is possible. Besides, New Orleans is a historic city, so it's worth rebuilding.I can also hardly imagine all of the city is ruined. Incredible amounts of houses are flooded or destroyed,true. But In the pictures I viewed from downtown NO, It looks like almost all buildings, although damaged, still stand.

Btw, can anyone explain to me why Americans insist on building wooden houses? Even in hurricane and tornado regions? Why not build brick houses? They're way tougher.

1:42 am on Sept 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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>>Why not build brick houses? They're way tougher.

The cost, I guess.

Why do they have mobile homes in coastal areas?

Same answer, cheaper.

6:40 pm on Sept 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Btw, can anyone explain to me why Americans insist on building wooden houses? Even in hurricane and tornado regions? Why not build brick houses? They're way tougher.

I believe that contrary to public opinion timber houses are actually stronger. If you see a whole house carried away intact in a flood, it will be a timber framed and clad house. Timber framing allows good bracing and lateral strength.

In New Zealand double brick construction is not allowed because of earthquake risk.

8:27 pm on Sept 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Brick buildings stand up better to tornadoes - I've seen evidence of this firsthand - but they are extremely cost-prohibitive. A frame house can normally stand up pretty well to tornadoes and hurricanes; it's only the most violent that cause the major damage.

A tornado went right over our house a few years ago and did absolutely no damage beyond an outside gate getting ripped off its hinges. Granted, this was a very weak tornado, but even in F5 damage, less than 5% of houses are actually levelled.

And, let me tell you, a tornado does NOT sound like a freight train! ;)

2:10 am on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The problems with the dykes, which no one mentions on CNN, is that they are saturated and weak. As soon as they get the three existing dykes repaired, and start pumping down the water in a few weeks, more dykes will break, as presure is put on them. Other than the French Quarter which is above sea level, and the downtown, which could be protected, they may be better off to move the suberbs to higher ground inland.

Oh by the way, Lake Pontchartrain is salt water, so New Orleans is flooded with salt water. It will take five years for the salt to leach out of the ground, minimun, so after they do rebuild, the trees will die, and lawns will not grow. New Orleans will be barren of planted vegetation.

3:01 am on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The lake is "brackish water," which is "water that is saltier than fresh water, but not as salty as sea water. But, yeah, it's salt water.
6:35 am on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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> It will take five years for the salt to leach out of the ground, minimun

I was watching footage of escaping gas & oil coming to the water's surface, looking as if the water was boiling, while the announcer rattled off a list of the various chemicals & compounds now in the water - fluids from vehicles, pesticides from the backyard shed, paints & solvents from the hardware store...

Say, a little help, folks? I'm trying to find out where Tulane University (Anthropology Department) is, in relation to the flooding. Most of TU's websites are down, email's out, and a friend is missing...

11:48 am on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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i dont want to start a political debate, but i find it absolutely shocking that little has been done to rescue people now almost 5 days after the event.

its taking about as long as it did to reach people in Aceh back then, except this event was announced several days before it happened.

And this is the US of A ...

12:08 pm on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The population of the USA is 295 million. Approx 1 million people lived in the area affected by the flooding, in New Oreleans alone.

That's make 1 out of every 295 Americans, a refugee, and Im not counting the people from Mississipi either.

I don't think the authorities quite understand the scope and magnitude of the situation, or it took them at least 72 hours to begin to get the picture.

The evacuation should have been ordered 24 hours earlier, as the National Huricanse Center is getting quite accurate on prediction.

<snip>

[edited by: lawman at 2:39 pm (utc) on Sep. 2, 2005]
[edit reason] No Conspiracy Theories Please [/edit]

2:37 pm on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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It's obvious that multiple agencies have failed the citizenry. However, if this thread goes political, it will have to be shut down.
2:46 pm on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Well put Lawman.
5:14 pm on Sept 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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OK, I'll leave the politics out of it. But the situation there is horrible, it's beyond tragic. I feel so angry that so little has been to help these people, and I feel so helpless at the same time.

I mean what can you do when you live 2K miles away? Donate money? As soon as I deposit my check today I will. Call and complain to your senator, governer, etc.? I spent all morning doing this. But, still, I feel helpless. I want to get in a boat and drive around and pick these people up.

What else can I do? Any ideas, suggestions? This situation is so much worse than 9/11 something must be done.

BTW, have you seen the effort going on at craigslist? It brought tears to my eyes. There are hundreds of people all over the country offering to take survivors into their homes. Some are even willing to pay for their airfare to get them there. Some people's generosity amazes me.

1:32 am on Sept 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Although this is a great thread, lets consolidate all the Katrina discussion to one spot.

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