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Blocking access to certain nations

Preventing spammers

     

webtravel

3:12 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Should there ever come a time when we should block certain users and countries from accessing our sites. For instance i notice that spam is usually orginating from south africa(domain extension .sa). The fact that i never see sales from africa means there is no current market for the items i sell. Blocking South Africa means no loss to myself at the moment.

Now that a majority of spammers run server from nations without spam laws. Blocking access to those certain nations would mean an internet with less spam.

Blocking pakistan, korea, and other rogue nations means i could prevent sensitive information such as which top cities are great tourist spots.

3:42 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Depends on your definition of a "rogue nation." When you say Korea, do you mean North Korea or South Korea? There is currently no such thing as "Korea."

What's rogue about South Korea? They're the largest users of the Alexa toolbar. They're the most advanced internet users in the world, even more advanced than the United States.

A lot of spam, as far as asia is concerned, comes out of China.

Also, .sa IS NOT a South African tld, it belongs to Saudi Arabia.

.za belongs to South Africa.

If you want to block the greatest amount of spam, you'll have to block out huge swaths of the United States.

I would start with Texas (though not Austin), Louisiana (though not New Orleans), Florida, Arkansas... Heck, pretty much the entire United States.

If you're defining "rogue" status based on the amount of spam generated, then the United States is the biggest rogue nation.

I wouldn't worry about .sa. Internet access in Saudi Arabia is tightly controlled.

:) Y

4:00 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I wouldn't worry about .sa. Internet access in Saudi Arabia is tightly controlled.

Isn't the same true of China? If memory serves their policy with regards to internet access is rather draconian...

- Tony

4:12 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Internet users in Saudi Arabia are blocked even more than in China. In fact, they can't even view many American web sites, so banning them by ip is redundant: They are already banned.

I'll let the chinese on this board speak for themselves. I think it's telling, however, that there aren't many saudi arabian members on this board, but quite a few from China.

The government has invested heavily in security systems to block access to sites it deems offensive, said to range in subject matter from religion to swimwear. BBC [news.bbc.co.uk]
4:22 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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If you were to start banning entire coutries from your site, then you would be opening up a huge can of worms.

I dont think it's something that should be even contemplated by the web community - we are supposed to be the INTERnational NETwork after all! :)

To ban a user base based on their geographic location is a pretty unfair generalisation, IMHO. Regardless of how much spam or how little business is generated from their countries.

And martinibuster has a good point - how much junk originates from our own countries? AOL anyone?

If people really want to to do something about spam, then I suggest starting we all start in our own back yard before we starting labeling entire countries.

IMHO, anyway.

MG

[edited by: Marketing_Guy at 5:46 pm (utc) on Jan. 27, 2003]

webtravel

5:14 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Blocking sites would be on a per site basis.

Example if I was the owner of the largest real estate organization in the world and had the database of listings open to the whole world wouldn't it be ideal to block access to certain countries that might misuse the site's information.

The above example is pertaining to a real live site and I have no way of knowing if the site already does such.

The title was modded down from the previous which included the words terrorist which pertained to the rogue nations.

5:16 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I wouldn't carpet bomb an entire TLD. There are ordinary people wherever you go, and there are jerks as well. Better to leave the channels open and give people the benefit of the doubt. Deal with the knot-heads individually.

T

5:38 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Administrator brett_tabke is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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I've banned a few countries before. What else can you do when page jacking rogue bot attacks come from 50-100 ips in the same country? Especially when said countries have a grand total of 0 sales for you.

One alternative to slow them down for awhile, is require cookie support. Most bots won't go to that step yet.

5:53 pm on Jan 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I noticed a site yesterday using an innocuous user input to screen for humans.

T

 

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