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Calling All Americans

What do you call...

     
4:53 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Hey!

What do you guys over there call the little wheels you put on kids bikes to stop them falling over?

Trust me, it's important ;)

Cy

4:53 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Training wheels.
4:54 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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training wheels
4:55 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Trainy Wheels :P
5:15 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Canadians call them training wheels too.
5:22 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Now I'm curious, what do you call them in the UK?
5:36 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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In the UK they call diapers "nappies" so I assume they'd call training wheels "wheelies." That is NOT what we want little munchkins doing, wheelies on tricycles. Maybe senior citizen hot-rodders on their tricycles, but not the little folks.

Woz

5:40 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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>In the UK they call diapers "nappies"

No no no no No!

You've got it all the wrong way around.

It should be "In the US they call nappies 'diapers'".

Oh, and in Aus, we call those little wheels, wait for it, "training wheels."

Onya
Woz

8:29 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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This is a nickname right? Please don't tell me you actually see these "nappies" in the grocery store under that name.
8:40 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Please don't tell me you actually see these "nappies" in the grocery store under that name.


Wrong :)

To get the low down on how to spell things like that correctly in English, go to Tesco.com , the largest UK grocery site online.

There you can discover

The nappies shelf
There are 43 items on this shelf. Select the quantities you require, and click 'add to basket'.

Never know there were quite so many brands!

8:41 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Well in the UK they are called 'stabalisers'
8:49 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Yup, 'Stabilisers' it is in the UK

.. remember them well ..

Is there anywhere online that lists UK<->US versions of words? was thinking of looking up motoring words, such as hood=boot, and so on .. and incorporating the popular ones on my humble site sometime

DoU

8:49 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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They build them [ahajokes.com] for rich kids too.
10:56 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Is there anywhere online that lists UK<->US versions of words?

Lots of them around, this one [englishclub.8m.com]gives a lot of translations.

10:59 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Stödhjul ;)
11:07 am on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Can I borrow your rubber please?

:-p

3:33 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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such as hood=boot

Er no, it isn't. hood=bonnet, trunk=boot and a collapsible top (whatever the US call it)=hood.

3:48 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Thank goodness I gave up fags years ago
3:51 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Americans also have 'fanny packs' - in the UK this can mean something entirely different!
4:01 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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My favorite British expression is one that got a friend of mine slapped.

He met a girl at the bar and they were making plans to go somewhere the following morning. After they got their plans straight he said,

"Great, I'll be by at 10 to knock you up".

Of course my friends and I burst into laughter, she shouted something unintelligible, slapped him then stormed off.

We still had tears rollng down our cheeks when he looked at us nonplussed and said,

"Did I say something wrong"?

He was quite unaware of the American meaning of "knock you up". When we told him what it meant his response was typical Brit.

"Well, bugger".

4:04 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Well i'm from the UK but I know that this phrase can be taken the wrong way....slaaaaappppp....
4:19 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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I'm from many places, and after a jar or two, i just don't care how its taken, its how it is recieved that matters.
4:24 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Torch = Flashlight
Pram = Baby Carriage
Football = Soccer
Aqualung = Scuba Tank
Rubber = Eraser
Headmaster = Principal

Aluminium = Aluminum
Colour = Color
Humour = Humor
Neighbourhood = Neighborhood
Harbour = Harbor
Cay = Key (small island)
Traveller = Traveler
Snorkelling = Snorkeling
Hullo = Hello
Lustre = Luster
Centre = Center

fiddle-faddle = nonsense!
fiddle-faddle = candy (Mmmmmm)

crapper = toilet
Crapper, Thomas = Englishman who invented the flush toilet

6:52 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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...UK.......US....
jumper = sweater
romper = jumper
6:59 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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pushchair = stroller
bloke = guy
cow = dumb broad
9:19 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Good god, I wish I'd never asked ;)
9:25 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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crapper = toilet

I thought you folks called it the 'loo'?

9:40 pm on Dec 17, 2002 (gmt 0)

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i was appalled and being called a 'ginger' by a brit for my red hair and freckles.

It felt like he was calling me 'Betty' or something.

6:16 pm on Dec 18, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Brits Say: Argy-bargy Americans Say: Heated argument

What a load <bleep>, I would love to know who compiled that list.!

Maybe 250 years ago we said "I wouldn't go downstairs right now sis, mum and dad are having an argy bargy" - but not now!

[edited by: lawman at 8:10 pm (utc) on Dec. 18, 2002]
[edit reason] sometimes an asterisk will save you; sometimes not [/edit]