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How many times do you re-boot your PC each day?

grrrr

     
4:59 pm on Nov 14, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



The dreaded blue screen of system hanging. The only solution - re-boot.

Memory leakage appears to be a problem, too.

About five or six times a day to re-boot is normal and I've come to accept it as a fact of computer life.

Am I getting off lightly, or do you have the same problem?

12:58 am on Nov 18, 2002 (gmt 0)

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But then if you built your machine yourself, or added new HW recently, double check your device compatibility.

Once had a AMD Via chipset board running a sonic storm sound card and a diamond stealth AGP graphics card. Only to find out that the sonic storm was not fully compatible with the via chipset booting up at a different current to the motherboard and subsequently screwed the initialisation of the agp graphics card due to iregularities in the frequency, thus creating blue screens about 10 times a day for a total of 1 week until I had figured out what had happened, sold the parts on to mates of mine and got myself a more compatible Intel system.

6:32 am on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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After 2 years of running Win98SE and seeing an average of 6-10 BSOD's and unexpected reboots, I went to Win2K. Win2K was recommended as a much more stable OS.

Before switching to Win2K though, countless hours were spent trying to pinpoint the problem. The HDD was wiped and the OS replaced at least 10 times. The power supply was replaced. The HDD was replaced.

After 2 weeks of installing Win2K, the OS was so badly corrupted that nothing would respond. The HDD was wiped again and the system crashed during install. At that point, I replaced all the generic memory and replaced it with Crucial memory. It has been running fine since then, without any crashes. When the system gets a little sluggish, the computer gets a reboot (about once a week).

The bottom line is spend the extra $$ on top quality memory. Otherwise, you will be spending time troubleshooting. Besides, memory is dirt cheap. It has dropped about 70-80% since the beginning of the year.

Ted

4:27 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Since I switched to XP, very seldom
4:31 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Jakpot, since I switched to XP it crashes MORE often:)

Most crashes for me are game related. Doing Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Excel etc is never a problem.

<mytip>Use BIG high quality fans</mytip>

5:03 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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My laptop has been up for 46 days now. I use it every day for work, because my wife uses the other computer, but I never turn if off unless I have to take it somewhere else. It is very silent once the disk has spun down, so there is noy really any reason to shut it down. Nice to have it ready for reading mail and looking things up on the net.

Every once in a while I log out to let the display server free up memory. It tends to eat a lot, because I view a lot of digital photographs. There might be a memory leak somewhere, but I think it is just the amount of images I shuffle around that causes it to grow.

I have seen it hang sometimes, due to a faulty graphics driver that has since been updated. When it happened the display just froze. I have usually just telnetted into it and killed the display server and logged in again. No need to reboot for a graphics driver error.

It runs Debian Linux, the 'sarge/testing' version. Last reboot was due to a kernel upgrade.

My server runs Debian woody/stable. It has been up for 96 days today. It was rebooted because the university where it is located, shut down the electricity completely for a weekend for some repairs and security checks.

In ten years of using Linux I cannot remember seeing one single panic (which is the Unix BSOD - a simple text message saying "Kernel panic: some incomprehensible explanation here") that I didn't cause myself by being mean to the poor computer.

René.

7:40 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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2k made it much better, usually every 2nd or 3rd da I have a lockup.
Sure emtying TIF (an setting it to 4 or 5 meg) may help a lot (check your Temp directory as well).

Since Windows appears to garbagate itself in time I built my fresh system with all the important apps (but no work done yet) and ghosted it to a separate partition.
When bluescreens become more frequent, I just restore that and Bingo.

Yeah, and an additional box with linux, too.

7:47 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I converted my to a water cooled system to keep all the chips, especially that Athlon XP processor cool. Added a new vid card because the NVidia card just wasn't compatible with this ASUS board. Suddenly started getting random crashes, no blue screens, just abrupt power offs. Drove me crazy, I spent hours in forums researching driver conflicts, BIOS flashing, etc.

The problem? The processor was too COOL. I had to change the low value on the operating temperature of the processor. The temp would drop below the allowed temperature range value and the system would power down.

I cursed XP Pro for two weeks while I was trying to find the problem. ;)

11:50 pm on Dec 4, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Booted again...

arrr the win XP nightmare...

i vote RedHat 8

12:10 am on Dec 5, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Here's how indows work [veneerz.com]

Flash file - 321K

1:44 am on Dec 5, 2002 (gmt 0)

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Artstart, very funny link!

Now that is a great use for Flash ............. lol

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