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New Buy Keywords for 1 Year Program

Not IGnet, new program good on Google, MSN, Yahoo etc

     

WebStart

7:30 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Does anyone know about this new program where you can buy keywords for one year, that can be used in the IE address bar, and in the search bar for Google, Yahoo, MSN, AltaVista, etc.? Only hitch is, the user has to have certain software loaded on their computer that they get from an Internet Explorer Browser upgrade.

In other words, type in "tires" in the Google searchbar, and you go right to the site of xxx tire company, not the Google search list.

I tried it and it worked on Google, but I then lost whatever upgrade I had downloaded, so could not continue to test it on MSN, etc. But the company that it is selling it says it works on all of them. Including Excite, Lycos, and Ask Jeeves.

The process with this new tech is a little different than with IGNet Keywords, in that the keywords you buy have to be screened and approved by human editors at Google, Yahoo, MSN, etc. to make sure your site is relevant to the keywords you buy.

bakedjake

7:32 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator bakedjake is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



The process with this new tech is a little different than with IGNet Keywords, in that the keywords you buy have to be screened and approved by human editors at Google, Yahoo, MSN, etc. to make sure your site is relevant to the keywords you buy.

That's really, really suspect. It sounds like scumware.

jdMorgan

7:43 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jdmorgan is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



This says it all:
"the user has to have certain software loaded on their computer"

The software is *not* part of Internet Explorer, and does not come from MicroSoft. So, the first question is, "How many users globally have this add-on installed?" Not many, I'll bet.

Jim

WebStart

8:08 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Thanks for the comments. Just by way of more info:

IGNet, the predecessor to this new tech, claims 86 million searches, per month in the US. I think these folks are claiming 14 million.

For the keywords widgets, and xwidgets, which I can trace on my site, IGNet shows about 3000 searches for 9 months since I was duped into buying from them last year. Traces out to about $2.00 per click.

I have not been happy with IGNet. But, this new tech, takes IGNet tech one step further, and claims to be usuable with the search bar in those prominent SEs, and they say they have agreements with Google, Yahoo, MSN, etc. to employ it with them. And it did work with Google when I tested it. I could list the site where the broswer upgrade is available, if that is permitted by the terms here, but I am not sure it is permitted.

I wish Google guy would respond to this post if he sees it, I am trying to get an answer from Adwords, maybe they will come through.

This new tech will certainly impact any AdWords advertisers, as the searcher who uses this will bypass the normal Google returns page with paid and unpaid listings and go straight to the page of whoever bought a particular keyword.

I also can't figure out why Yahoo would use it since they just bought Overture, which is a money maker, and this would defeat Overture PPC listings on Yahoo and everywhere else -- if it became widely used.

And yes, I agree it sounds like a scam, which is why I am wondering if very many members here have heard about it, or better, know anything definite about it.

jdMorgan

8:21 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jdmorgan is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Note that I didn't call it a scam, it's just that market penetration of *any* technology that requires users to install a browser helper object or similar is going to be low, and as you observed above, have a high cost-per-click as a result.

I look at my logs and see all those visitors using IE 3, 4, and 5, Windows 95, etc., and think, "Why don't they upgrade?" These users are not going to install proprietary software, unless it self-installs.

These folks have to call it a "Browser upgrade" in order to get people to install it. It is, however, not really an upgrade to the browser, but rather an add-on. Some might use the phrase "dupe people into installing it," but I'm trying to be objective here. I don't think this business model will work.

Caveat Emptor.

Jim

makemetop

8:32 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)



>they have agreements with Google, Yahoo, MSN, etc...

And I'm Cleopatra :)

WebStart

8:46 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



jd Morgan: <Note that I didn't call it a scam, it's just that market penetration of *any* technology that requires users to install a browser helper object or similar is going to be low<

Understand, good advice.

Actually, though I say I was duped by IGNet, when I re-examine that $2.00 a click I paid for 9 months for IGNet Keywords, it is not that much higher than what one wold pay on Overture, or Google AdWords for the terms I bought. And that ratio is for 9 months. In the next 3 months my cost is the same, as it was a one year buy, but the searches will increase in number: if in the next 3 months, it comes down to $1 or a little more per click, it would be on the mark for what is paid on Overture or Google AdWords for similar keywords.

This new tech guarantees 1100 searches per month, or 13,200 for the year at a total price paid in advace that figures out to be about 5 cents a click, if 1100 a month comes true.

Re other comments:
It did work with Google, yesterday, but somehow I lost the software I downloaded yesterday, and can't check it on Yahoo, MSN, etc.

Thanks for the replies.

wkitty42

9:42 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



webstart,

i can't see how anyone can guarantee x number of searches for widgets... the only way i'm aware of guaranteeing anything like that is to produce it myself... either the entire bunch or the remainder to bring it to that level... a savy group doing this would intersperse the generated stuff amongst the normal searches and would definitely be watching those trends closely so they don't overfly the target goal too much...

PatrickDeese

11:47 pm on Aug 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



You might want to read Google's own page about SEO firms offering "keywords in the browser"

http:*//www.google.com/webmasters/seo.html

Bulletpoint #5 pretty much assures me that the "agreement" that they have with google is b.s.

They have hijacked G and other SEs search box with their "helpful" tool.

If you read the Usenet Google Support General threads just about 1 in 10 is about some software or the other hijacking their web browser.

buckworks

12:10 am on Aug 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator buckworks is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



<<They have hijacked G and other SEs search box with their "helpful" tool. >>

That says it all: they're parasites selling you stolen traffic.

WebStart

12:13 am on Aug 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member




PatrickDeese >You might want to read Google's own page about SEO firms offering "keywords in the browser ... http:*//www.google.com/webmasters/seo.html. They have hijacked G and other SEs search box with their "helpful" tool. " <

Thanks Patrick. I think you have given the best information yet, and I hope it is not only good for me, but for any others being "sold" this xxxx --- I don't know what to call it, at this point, but need to call it some name that will warn others:

"keyword search in the address bar, keyword search in a searchengine search bar."

Anyway, Thanks to all. You answered my question.

PatrickDeese

2:31 am on Aug 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I get this type "keyword in the browser" offers as spam emails repeatedly.

For a while it amused me to reply with a link to the Google SEO info page and say something like "please explain your product VS Google's advice."

After about 6 of these "offers" in about a month, I was no longer amused, so I reported them to their ISP (that I got from their email headers), their domain name registrar, their web host *and* their web host's upstream service provider.

24 hours later their domain stopped working.

Email spam is not taken lightly and is against just about everyone's TOU/AUP/TOS, so it doesn't take much to have the spammer get at least a warning, ideally much worse.

 

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