Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 3.209.80.87

Forum Moderators: open

Message Too Old, No Replies

Europe moves closer to a Cookie ban

Latest on the EU Government stupidity

     
3:03 pm on Nov 19, 2001 (gmt 0)

Moderator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts:3668
votes: 55

9:14 pm on Nov 19, 2001 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member heini is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 31, 2001
posts:4404
votes: 0


The European Parliament has demonstrated a considerable degree of cluelessness on internet matters by this vote for a regulation of cookies combined with their adoption of the cybercrime treaty. Astonishing. The setting of cookies get´s regulated out of privacy concerns while those get radically neglected by a cybercrime treaty which allows authorities to intercept any web communication at will.

So what´s at stake?
Basically: Cookies are allowed to last for the duration of one session, not inbetween. Also users must agree explicitely to accepting the cookie.
While this doesn´t sound to hard, it would disturb more refined cookie systems severly.

The internet lobby, especially the British Interactive Advertising Bureau, IAB, is campaigning already.

It should be remembered anyhow: it´s just the European Parliament at this point. The next step would be the European council to agree on the proposal, and they are traditionally rather supportive of business concerns. And even if it would pass the council, the proposal would have to be adopted by each country government.

11:38 pm on Nov 19, 2001 (gmt 0)

Moderator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts:3668
votes: 55


heini - do you think that any of our individual governments have any more idea of what is going on!

I am involved in a UK freelancers forum where this topic is being very seriously debated at the moment. They are taking the threat of cookies being banned a lot more seriously than I am.

My current view is that if the EU government bans cookies - I will just get a free US web host and set my cookies from files on the US servers until such time as someone deems this illegal.

Okay this may be dubious - but the internet transcends national boundaries - governments have to realise this!

11:55 pm on Nov 19, 2001 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member heini is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 31, 2001
posts:4404
votes: 0


Ian
basically I just think national govenments will want taxes. Further hampering the already agonizing internetbiz will not be in their interest.
12:03 am on Nov 20, 2001 (gmt 0)

Moderator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts:3668
votes: 55


I basically agree with you - see

[webmasterworld.com...]

for my outline of what may happen. This is a flag of convenience situation if national governments are stupid enough to apply individual laws.

3:29 pm on Nov 20, 2001 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ciml is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:June 22, 2001
posts:3805
votes: 2


From ammendment 26:
So-called cookies, spyware, web bugs, hidden identifiers and other similar devices that enter the users´ terminal equipment without their explicit knowledge or explicit consent in order to gain access to information, to store hidden information or to trace the activities of the user may seriously intrude the privacy of these users.

It is the user agent that stores and sends this information. As far as I can see this whole thing is a result of two big browser vendors failing to implement cookies in satisfactory manner. Other browsers managed to avoid illegal (in HTTP terms) and cross-site cookies long ago.

Ian, I don't see how the location of the Web server makes a difference. We operate equipment in Scotland & the US, but I was not aware that our activities on our US based server were outside UK law.

3:53 pm on Nov 20, 2001 (gmt 0)

Moderator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts:3668
votes: 55


ciml - which jurisdiction applies depends on how you set up your organisation. I cite shipping as an example many companies have vessels registered in Panama to avoid UK merchant shipping regulations. Whether this is done through a Panamanian holding company I don't know.

I would suggest that there are plenty of places at the moment where you could register a company and host servers which could allow you to avoid such laws. I am not a lawyer myself but I do know that in a lot of other industries similar things go on.

5:46 pm on Nov 20, 2001 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ciml is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:June 22, 2001
posts:3805
votes: 2


Ian, I agree that these things go on all the time, I'm just not convinced that the geographical location of the Web server is enough.

Online casinos successfully managed to avoid UK betting duty, and HMG are now changing the rules to let the onshore boys compete.

If we're lucky then the EU will notice the outflux of capital and climb down on some of the more daft ideas.

There's no sign of that yet, though. :(

8:00 pm on Nov 29, 2001 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 20, 2001
posts:84
votes: 0


"BUSINESS WEEK reported under the headline, "Ashcroft's Global Internet Power-Grab," that a "new law lets the Justice Department go after foreign hackers, even if U.S. computers weren't a target," and asks whether the US should be the global cyber police."

[drudgereport.com ]

Looks like we may be going in the same direction.

12:46 am on Nov 30, 2001 (gmt 0)

Moderator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts:3668
votes: 55


Similar stories hit mainstream press in UK today - 'US to become cybercops' 'FBI turn up on doorway of Welsh shoolkid' stuff.

They might get away with it here but I wouldn't want to know the consequences of the FBI meddling in China or Libya. (goes off to find ISP/Hosting provider in Libya - should be safe from most Euro/US Laws)

2:55 am on Nov 30, 2001 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 20, 2001
posts:84
votes: 0


goes off to find ISP/Hosting provider in Libya - should be safe from most Euro/US Laws

---lol’s then puts patriotic moderate Republican game-face back on…honestly---

I don’t like blowing such news reports out proportion. Hopefully “U.S. becomes world cyber-cop” is just media rhetoric.

---goes back to laughing---;)