Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.234.244.30

Forum Moderators: incrediBILL

Message Too Old, No Replies

Convince the boss the company should use Firefox

Time to dump IE

     
9:03 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Nov 1, 2004
posts:68
votes: 0



I've been stating to colleagues and managers at work that IE should be dumped (both Mac and PC versions) and we should all use Firefox, problem is they wont move across to Firefox until its a final release. I need some more good reasons to dump IE, anyone got any links lisitng the fors and againsts of both browsers?
9:05 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Sept 19, 2002
posts:1018
votes: 0


This might help. It's a link on the mozilla home page.

[ptech.wsj.com...]

[edited by: tedster at 11:49 pm (utc) on Nov. 2, 2004]
[edit reason] make link live [/edit]

9:42 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 17, 2001
posts:1262
votes: 0


Corporate IT departments can take years to adopt new software, and users will throw fits anyway. If all they're waiting for is a 1.0 release, I'd say you're in good shape just waiting a couple of months.
10:07 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Nov 1, 2004
posts:68
votes: 0


>ptech.wsj.com/archive/ptech-20040916.html

Thats interesting as we are mainly a Mac based company, but running IE 5.3 (along with Safari) with the handful of PC users running IE 6.

Because most users probably have a windows PC at home when the open a browser they just go for what they know and thats the big blue 'e'

I'd rather have Firefox on all the Macs and PC's and be done with it, I reckon around 20% of my time is currently used up by having to hack code so it works with all browsers!

11:12 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from CA 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member encyclo is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 31, 2003
posts:9063
votes: 2


problem is they wont move across to Firefox until its a final release

They are quite right - I wouldn't recommend Firefox in any corporate-wide deployment until 1.0 is out at the very earliest. However, it's not as long as you think: 1.0 Final is due on November 9th - just one week from now. So, hold your horses, and once the stable release is available, get testing.

dcrombie

2:02 pm on Nov 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

Inactive Member
Account Expired

 
 


Why don't you just copy the Explorer icon to their Safari executable ;)
9:31 am on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Nov 1, 2004
posts:68
votes: 0


Firefox 1.0 RC2 is now out, so we are getting to close to a GM product!
10:07 am on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 8, 2003
posts:548
votes: 0


Firefox IS the better browser. It's more standards compliant. It's about as fast as IE. You can get lots and lots of extensions and themes for it. In some areas it's safer/more secure and more transparent.

OTOH, I don't believe in the common conception that open source software is necessarily less prone to exploits than commercial software. Wait for Firefox to gain a considerable installed base of say 20% and you will see the first real exploits. It just takes one killer exploit to ruin a product's reputation - open source FF or closed source IE. In such a situation it would be to IE's advantage that it is included with 90% of newly purchased PCs . There are many, many people who don't know how to download and install a browser or who don't know that it can be done at all or who don't even know what a browser. These people will continue using IE even if its reputation is ruined.

10:27 am on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 5, 2002
posts:1318
votes: 0


One thing worth remembering is that any exploits found in Firefox are usually patched in a day, whereas IE continues to suffer from holes, some unpatched after years. When a new patch is made, it is weeks before it comes out. Think of IE as a lumbering dinosaur and Firefox as a speedy lizard.
5:12 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:July 31, 2003
posts:2280
votes: 0


>> any exploits found in Firefox are usually patched in a day

So you and I know about it. Joe Public relies on his Windows PC calling home for security updates.

6:11 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:June 9, 2003
posts:1908
votes: 0


FireFox has the option (turned on by default) to check for updates too.

Besides which, FireFox vulnerabilities are likely to be limited to merely crashing the browser, since it doesn't include ActiveX. This makes it inherently more secure, regardless of what market share it ever achieves.

6:33 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:May 8, 2002
posts:390
votes: 0


I have access to every computer int he office and installed Firefox at the same time we switched to Symantec Corporate 9 from AVG.

Most of them think it's the new version of IE because I changed the Firefox icon to the IE icon when it was installed to make sure I didn't have a bunch of people asking me where the "E" icon dissappeared to.

They love it and have no idea, even though it says Mozilla Firefox right on the top of their browser.

Huzzah!

6:35 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from CA 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member encyclo is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 31, 2003
posts:9063
votes: 2


FireFox vulnerabilities are likely to be limited to merely crashing the browser

True, but not entirely: vulnerabilities can be more serious that just a browser crash (which, while annoying, is usually recoverable).

It is feasible to imagine vulnerabilities which could affect the data held by Firefox itself within the profile, including bookmarks, cached documents, cookies and stored passwords. While it is unlikely that even a buffer overflow would not open a breach at the operating system level, the data is often more valuable than the program itself.

It's the same situation when using a Unix-based operating system and proclaiming confidently that the system is safe simply because you are using an account with limited permissions - but the system can be easily recovered, but any virus which damages the user's home directory can be disastrous.

The advantage with Firefox over IE on Windows is undeniable, but keeping up to date with patches is still vital. Firefox is more likely to limit the damage to just your computer, but that's not much of a consolation if it is your data which is destroyed.

6:37 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 14, 2003
posts:4249
votes: 16


Firefox is not ready for business yet. There are still a lot of sites that don't look right or don't work. There are many websites that detect IE and if you don't have it you can not go any further. Even though their site does work in FF. IE is the only thing they tested on and thats all they support. It is rare that I have to switch nowdays.
7:21 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 13, 2003
posts:590
votes: 0


There are many websites that detect IE and if you don't have it you can not go any further.

I just this week fired off two scolding e-mails, one to my bank, and one to a hosting company, when they added a delightful browser-sniffing javascript to ban non-IE browsers. I was using Safari on one, Mozilla on the other. I told them, "All I had to do was change the user-agent string in Mozilla/Safari, and I got in and everything worked just fine. My browser is fully supported; it's your browser-sniffing that's broken."

Morons.

7:43 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 14, 2003
posts:4249
votes: 16


Never thought of that. You could make that part of your rollout. Change the useragent by default. Of course that would not help the ff stats. But you got to do what you got to do.
8:59 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:June 15, 2003
posts:2395
votes: 0


a) >> Firefox is not ready for business yet.
b) >> There are still a lot of sites that don't look right or don't work.

I don't understand - what, exactly, does (a) have to do with (b)?

Because you have a road with large holes in it, does that make your car/bus/bicycle any worse or better than it is?

9:10 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 17, 2004
posts:174
votes: 0


I deployed forefox in my office some months back (very small enviornment ~10 machines).

For us it was a combination of the Department of Homeland Securities recomendation, one user installing spyware (unfortunatly our accounting software requires admin privledges), and getting it on the bosses machine for evaluation.

Most users have since thrown it on their home machines.

11:04 pm on Nov 4, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 14, 2003
posts:4249
votes: 16


For business you have to consider the amount of support you are going to have to provide for it. I guess it could be less. The ammount of support for ff may be small. I'm sure the support for problems with IE could be quite large.
9:51 am on Nov 5, 2004 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 5, 2002
posts:1318
votes: 0


There are still a lot of sites that don't look right or don't work.

This hasn't been my experience. Also, it's not Firefox's fault that these sites don't work properly, it's the bad code used. So it's not like we have to wait for a new version of Firefox that will solve this. Only educating the webmaster is the solution.

Same thing applied with Opera. Nearly always it's out-of-date browser sniffing to blame for non-working sites.

Talking of Opera, it comes with a user agent set to "MSIE 6.0" by default! Presumably they did this because of bad sites. I always switch it to "Opera" myself, and rarely have problems.

I'd say 95% of sites or more work fine in Opera or Firefox. Both browsers have implemented routines to cope with 'old-school' coding methods, rather than display garbage. It seems to be working.

 

Join The Conversation

Moderators and Top Contributors

Hot Threads This Week

Featured Threads

Free SEO Tools

Hire Expert Members