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Separators required.

but pretty or long winded?

     
5:47 pm on Feb 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member suzyuk is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I'm guilty :o

Source [w3.org]

10.5 Until user agents (including assistive technologies) render adjacent links distinctly, include non-link, printable characters (surrounded by spaces) between adjacent links.

so usability guidelines tell us to separate the links with more than just whitespace, that's Ok, most people do that like the bottom of this page, which uses the pipe character.. but what about those breadcrumb trails and the right double angled brackets or other fancy ascii characters?

here's a sample of what some of them sound like:
Character - JAWS output


- vertical bar
: - colon
> - greater
< - less
- - dash
- right double angle bracket
- em dash
~ - tilde
- bullet
- dot
- section

some of them are user setting based but it makes me think, imagine a long breadcrumb trail seperated with or worse imagine having to listen through all that!

Suzy

8:38 pm on Feb 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member drdoc is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



What is the mid dot called?
9:19 pm on Feb 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Solution?

div.footer ul li{display:inline;padding:0 2px;}


<div class="footer"
<ul>
<li><a href=""></a></li><li><a href=""></a></li><li><a href=""></a></li>
</ul>
</div>

CSS shortened to illustrate.

10:28 pm on Feb 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



...breadcrumb trail seperated with or worse imagine having to listen through all that!

OMG. One of the sites I maintain has 500 hand coded pages with breadcrumb trails that have up to five left double angle brackets in them.

And JAWS seems to leave no user agent string.

5:14 am on Feb 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Solution?

div.footer ul li{display:inline;padding:0 2px;}

<div class="footer"
<ul>
<li><a href=""></a></li><li><a href=""></a></li><li><a href=""></a></li>
</ul>
</div>

Best of both worlds:

div.footer ul li {
display:inline;
padding:0 2px 0 10px;
background:transparent url(path/to/raquo.gif) no-repeat 0 50%;
}

-b

3:37 pm on Feb 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member suzyuk is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Doc,
the mid dot (interpunct) is in that list.. and is usually read as "dot"

yes use lists, those natural seperators..
but, what about the <title> element?

11:46 am on Feb 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



guilty too :o for the right double angled bracket

will look into bedlam solution

5:35 pm on Feb 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



But, what about the <title> element?

12.1.4 Link titles
The title attribute may be set for both A and LINK to add information about the nature of a link. This information may be spoken by a user agent, rendered as a tool tip, cause a change in cursor image, etc.

Use the title attribute sparingly. I was guilty of misusing the attribute when I first learned of it years ago. I would take the anchor text and use that as the title attribute. Yikes! For someone using a screen reader, that meant an echo wherever the title attributes were. :(

One of these days I'm going to think before posting right after I awaken! Sorry Suzy :(

P.S. The <title> element is read out loud as soon as you visit the page (whatever is there, is read out loud). I downloaded the CONNECT Outloud (www.freedomscientific.com/fs_products/software_connect.asp) software suggested in another topic and took it for a spin. Definitely an eye opener. It became very annoying, very quickly. And, that was on pages that were designed for accessibility.

[edited by: pageoneresults at 6:08 pm (utc) on Feb. 19, 2006]

5:56 pm on Feb 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member drdoc is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Suzy was not talking about the title attribute, but rather the <title> tag itself.

I think, what she's talking about is page titles like:

Home > Products > Jackets > Kids
Home :: Artwork :: Photos :: B&W
Home Information Pricing

6:11 pm on Feb 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member encyclo is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



what about the <title> element?

I consider that the

title
element is the wrong place to have breadcrumb-like lists. The
title
should be much more descriptive than that. Borrowing DrDoc's examples, instead of saying:

<title>Home > Products > Jackets > Kids</title>

<title>Home :: Artwork :: Photos :: B&W</title>

<title>Home  Information  Pricing</title>

How about:

<title>Kids Jackets from Example Clothing Co.</title>

<title>Black and white photos by A. Photographer</title>

<title>Pricing Information for Widgets</title>

Blog

title
elements are often the worst offenders here: the
title
should be the post title, and possibly the branding if really necessary, as in the first example above. Much better usability (and accessibility too), surely?
6:29 pm on Feb 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member drdoc is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



While I tend to agree with you, encyclo, it is surprising how often you see sites with a breadcrumb trail in the title bar.

It is also surprising how seldom it is considered part of accessibility. :)

 

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