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Ideas to block or password protect FB and Google Drive / Photos

     
1:57 am on Jun 21, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I'm about to hire an employee to work another shift, and it just makes sense for us to share a computer since everything they'll need is already set up on mine.

But of course, I don't want them accessing my private stuff.

In an ideal world, I would have it set so that when they log in to the computer (Windows 7) using their own password, they would have access to everything EXCEPT for the sites and programs that I select; eg, Facebook, Google Drive, Google Photos, and maybe a few message boards (like this one). And maybe Thunderbird and Gmail, I haven't decided on that one yet.

I don't want to have to log out of everything manually each time I leave for the day, that would be a time consuming pain. I just want one password to be able to access them, and another password can't.

I can use a Chrome extension, a separate log-in program, anything. Any suggestions?
2:34 am on June 21, 2017 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Administrator keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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Can't you put your stuff behind the Admin settings?
I don't want to have to log out of everything manually each time I leave for the day, that would be a time consuming pain.
Well, that's the way you need to separate the two logins. IMO it's not "a time consuming pain" at all. Takes but seconds.
3:46 am on June 21, 2017 (gmt 0)

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'm about to hire an employee to work another shift, and it just makes sense for us to share a computer

This seems like a really bad idea. The damage (unintentional) that can be done is enormous. Let say you go home, your employee comes in and starts working, changes files here and there as needed, but somewhere a long the line he makes an honest mistake. Next morning you come in you continue working, then at the end of the day you realize there is a bug. Good luck finding the source. Is it your work that caused it, or are you seeing a side effect of caused by something else done by some else. Who knows? What was changed? Why? By who When?

I'm no expert in this, but you should probably isolate your work environments and use a source control software such as GIT to ensure that any changes made are documented and traceable. Now if you want to use the same machine that is one thing (seems pointless to me given the cost of a machine vs the cost of hiring someone) but you should each keep your work completely separate.
 

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