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Books for Kids

     
7:58 am on Oct 11, 2011 (gmt 0)

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i know we've had the occasional holiday or xmas favourites listed here before...

has anyone (with or without kids) got any recommendations or favourites that went down well? for any age i guess but especially for that just before teen age, eg 10-13.

my all time favourites are:

Lord of the Flies and Catcher in the Rye,

but i've a feeling they might be considered a little old fashioned by kids today!
10:41 am on Oct 11, 2011 (gmt 0)

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For boys give them C S Forester's Hornblower books. I had devoured my Dad's collection by the age of 12.
11:27 pm on Oct 11, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Edgar Rice Burroughs, particularly the Barsoom (Mars) books ... there's a movie coming out next March. :)

Tom Swift, Jr. (good luck finding those anywhere except the web)

Dinosaurs, Prehistoric Mammals (just about any of the new books will be fine, but lack the "wonder" of the Roy Chapman Andrews books from the 50s), the Ocean, Ships (naval, ie: sailing ships, early liners, etc.), Ancient History (pick an era: Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Phonecian), Middle History (Age of Exploration, Industrial Revolution), Current History (but pick and choose with care... look for histories not political speak... unless that's what you want to teach your kids).

Ellery Queen, Agatha Chritie, S S Van Dine... ie. Mysteries

L'Amour, Mulford, Grey, Fox Jr... ie. Westerns

War related like Caiden, Carrel, Catton (samples... different wars) depends on the child

Romance (list too expansive, and some get too steamy, but early Harlequins are fun)

Original Juvenile (Blyton, Burnett, Baum, Twain...) Nostalgia which allows of parents explaining the PC differences these days (unless you opt for the ABRIDGED VERSIONS and thus rob the child of an important learning)

As can be seen, I'm a reader, have been a reader, wish all were readers.

The political stuff from Aristotle to Suskind is probably a bit much.

And, tragically, Shakespeare, Dante, Milton, and Bacon are probably a bit advanced for that age-group.

But I do like that first suggestion best. Edgar Rice Burroughs... if not Barsoom, then Tarzan, or anything else he wrote.
6:51 am on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Go to a good bookstore and ask what kids read these days. It is not a good idea to base your christmas presents on the advice of a bunch of oldtimers in an online forum and end up with a list of what kids read in the early 50s and 60s. ;)

Of course there are classics that kids still read.

But better ask the children what they like, if they have a favorite author or a favorite genre. I read much when I was a kid, but I remember that I somehow read in "clusters". I would read only criminal stories for some time - like Conan Doyle or Agatha Christie. Then I had a phase I read everything from Jules Verne. Then greek mythology. Then for half a year when I was fifteen I only read horror stories from Stephen King or Peter Straub. Then it was fantasy with Tolkien, Hohlbein. When I lost interest in a topic I would move on to something else.

It's no use buying kids a book about dinosaurs when the dinosaur phase already ended months ago. Or fantasy books when that already was last year.
7:10 am on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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>> It is not a good idea to base your christmas presents on the advice of a bunch of oldtimers in an online forum and end up with a list of what kids read in the early 50s and 60s.

yeah, i agree, i'm aware that all the classics i liked are not really read by kids today.

these two kids (boys) seem to read a lot, i've looked through their bookshelves and asked them as well - i just wanted to try an author they hadn't yet read, their theme seems to be War and Spies.
11:04 am on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Oh, krap... I forgot Harry Potter...

What kids read these days is not what kids should read, but then again, the publishers only print what the webmaster ad sense (er... ahem) dictate they read.

You do NOT ask the book store. You (as a parent) suggest what the offspring read. Else FAIL, but that's a different story.

Then again, might be easier to just thrust a handful of bucks at the kid and let them "read" what they want ... and don't be surprised if it is not ink on dead tree leaves... might be a video game!
11:46 am on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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tangor - yeah, but i think every kid has already read harry potter!

i'd agree kids need direction, in books as with all things!

>>easier to just thrust a handful of bucks at the kid

agreed, but i've resolved not to give cash as a gift to kids any more, it feels like a cop out, as an educated adult i feel i should try to subtly point them in a good direction, even if they don't take heed (you never know they might pick up on it later)
4:55 pm on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Roald Dahl (Wacky fun)
Nancy Drew ( Girl detective)
Hardy Boys ( Mysteries for boys)
Enid Blyton- Five Find outers, Famous Five. (mystery)
Three Investigators ( Mystery for boys)
Secret Unicorn ( Linda Chapman ) esp. for Girls
Richmal Crompton ( Just William) ( Naughty boys fun)
A- Z Mysteries
Goosebumps - R.L. Stine ( Kiddie horror)
9:42 pm on Oct 12, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Trouble is that we now have "teen fiction". Any bright kid is capable of going straight to adult (as opposed top "adult") books from 11 or 12. Point them to good science fiction and Napoleonic war stories (Hornblower as I suggested before or Sharpe). I learned more about the Peninsula campaign from Sharpe than I did from studying it at school.
5:06 am on Oct 13, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Hold on, think about your question. The answers here are well meaning, but they mean nothing without knowing the person. Kids (like adults) don't read books because they are on someone's list of what THEY think is proper. Its pretty much like asking "what movies should I watch?". Everybody assumes they have great advice, but in the end, its just what they liked and think you should watch (read).



Ask 100 people here at WebmasterWorld, and you will receive 100 different answers. How does that help?

If you truly have no idea what this child would enjoy as a book, be a good friend or relative and choose a gift of a different sort. He or she will eventually discover what they really enjoy reading.
8:53 am on Oct 13, 2011 (gmt 0)

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>>If you truly have no idea what this child would enjoy as a book

as i stated, war and spy books are his favourite themes, books these days tend to be published in series, he seems to be up to date (eg up to the latest one) in all the series he knows ..

i was looking for something on theme but new to him that other people found their kids liked.

>>Hold on, think about your question

that made me chcukle though thanks! it could easily be applied to most of the questions on WebmasterWorld. most of the seo and cms and suchlike questions are asked with no context at all, therefore making the answers almost worthless!
10:09 am on Oct 13, 2011 (gmt 0)

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books these days tend to be published in series, he seems to be up to date (eg up to the latest one) in all the series he knows ..


If you give us an idea as to which author / series he is currently reading , we can then surely suggest something on similar lines. For ex. it makes no sense to suggest Agatha Christie to someone who is reading Enid Blyton currently..It is too big a jump..
4:04 pm on Oct 13, 2011 (gmt 0)

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At 10-13, peer pressure starts to kick in and individuality takes a bit of a back seat -- kids that age start reading whatever their friends think is cool.

At that age (which was only 2-3 years ago), my daughter and her friends went through the Babysitter's Club series, Goosebumps series, Harry Potter series then Twilight Series, (I think in that order).

Boys would probably like all but the Babysitter Club books.
9:42 pm on Oct 13, 2011 (gmt 0)

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Biggles

Love Biggles - not the new editions as they have been played around with. Still remember the stories now after um.. a large number of years. Biggles In Spain was my favourite.

I also had a weird book about the Falkland Islands, years before the invasion, wish I still had it. Spies and stuff. Hidden tunnels in London, Germans, more spies ...

Fan of the Hungry Caterpillar :)
3:30 am on Oct 14, 2011 (gmt 0)

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I second ' Biggles' . How could I forget Biggles! The ones with air combat action and spies from WW I and WW II are too good.. Super stuff. I still read them when I get the chance.

12- 13 year old boys should love them.
 

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