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Moving to Responsive have a question

Moving our site to a responsive design what does Google like?

     
4:37 pm on Feb 25, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Hello Forum members.

We have an ecommerce platform we have been operating since 2007 on OSCommerce CMS.

This has done well for us in the years till we got hit with Penguin which we are now recovered from.

In anticipation of Google rolling out a new penalty for not being mobile friendly we would like to change our CMS or update our current to a responsive design which is what Google says they prefer.

Could some of you webmasters please comment on what you have used recently in responsive that Google has responded well to in search results? Also what you found to be most friendly for your customers.

Thank you in advance,
Chris
6:49 pm on Feb 25, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Google rolling out a new penalty

Source? Or just the usual FUD?
6:51 pm on Feb 25, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Just the normal FUD I guess.

They have made it pretty clear they want mobile responsive designs.
10:43 pm on Feb 26, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Usual FUD? Hello, are you not paying attention?

Google has been warning people for years and in the last few months they started sending out letters saying they have detected that your site is not mobile friendly and they are planning to remove you from the search results for users on mobile devices.

This is real. If you want mobile traffic, you must have a mobile-friendly site. I have a few old sites I haven't gotten around to updating and have received the letters.

As Pierre Far of Google said at Pubcon last year, "If you don't have a mobile site yet, it's too late" meaning you have been hurt enough that you're going to have to catch up.
3:46 am on Feb 27, 2015 (gmt 0)

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My comment was addressed at the word "penalty" which implies something very specific and numerical.
1:11 pm on Feb 27, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Search Engine Journal reports that google is rolling out a massive algo on April 21st. Look for in Searchengihejournal google-use-mobile-usability-ranking-factors-mobile-search-resuls/127045. It then links to the Google Webmaster Forum that show the message from Google.

So no more FUD. Looks like Google is rolling out a major Algo on Mobile (penalty if you dont have)

So my original question do you know of any google friendly responsive CMS I can use for ecommerce.
4:59 pm on Feb 27, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I understand the difference. Many people talk about a "penalty," but what they really mean is that a factor that once helped them rank no longer helps them rank. For the most part people hit by Panda aren't being "penalized" they are just no longer getting ranking credit for something that once helped them.

Or people will talk about a duplicate content penalty, which is just wrong. There is no duplicate content penalty.

Duplicate content, for example, prevents you from ranking because Google is splitting authority and can't figure out your structure. But Google will *try* to solve your dupe content issues for you if it can.

With the mobile issue, though, this is different. Google is analyzing your site and making an active effort to remove you from the search results.

No, it isn't a manual action or a webspam violation, but to me it's more like a penalty than it is like the dupe content or even thin content problem.

Anyway, it's mostly just semantics, but to me the main thing is the distinction between

1. ranking poorly because you are failing to obtain positive factors on your behalf

2. ranking poorly because Google is punishing you in the rankings because of negative factors.

Dupe content, most rankings drops due to Penguin and Panda are #1

The mobile issue is #2.

[update]Having said that and having that impression from the dire email from Google, today's Google Webmaster Central presents it more like a dupe content/Panda/Penguin thing where it's more a matter of failing to send a positive signal.

[googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com...]

In any case, it is a matter of concern that will have a significant impact on your rankings.
[/update]
2:44 am on Apr 11, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Google is analyzing your site and making an active effort to remove you from the search results.


A bit of a digression, but anyway... It will be interesting to see what does actually change on the 21 April. If Google was to simply drop the non-mobile friendly sites from the SERPs or apply a hefty "penalty" then this could result in a very bad user experience, which is not in Google's interests. Google already displays "mobile-friendly" next to the results in mobile search - is that not enough?

I would have thought that when searching, users just want to get at the information. After all, all modern smartphones are at least capable of displaying even the most unfriendly-mobile pages with a bit of panning and zooming. If users can't find the information (that they expect to find) then the search is not working and they get a bad user experience. When users move from a desktop environment to mobile they still generally expect the same results to appear when they search (to get back to that article they started reading or whatever). If they can't find it, it's a bad user experience.

Whether a site is mobile friendly or not is also very subjective in the real world (except for the fact that Google is telling you whether it is or it isn't). There are certainly many so called "non-mobile-friendly" sites that are actually very friendly on mobile (which might also depend on the browser and the navigation tools to hand). And likewise, there are a fair number of "mobile-friendly" sites that give the user a downgraded experience when compared to the desktop version!
3:20 am on Apr 12, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Some pages are so unfriendly that I think Google sees it as frustrating on the level of spam - you go there and it's useless. The main thing that google seems to be looking at is font size and touch target size on navigation. In other words it doesn't appear that failing to have responsive images would make any difference.

Anyway, there is no penalty (i.e. lowering in rankings), there is an all-out exclusion. They have basically said that either a page makes the cut or it doesn't. If it doesn't make the cut, it will be excluded. Excluding one page does not impact how google sees other pages on the site and the exlusions are "real time" meaning that as soon as the page is mobile friendly and gets crawled again, you're back in the game.