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Any good email service for my domain?

     
7:24 am on Sep 5, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Hi so I am looking for the fastest, most reliable email service for my new domain name. Can anyone please recommend a service? I'm willing to pay for the plan. TIA!
1:58 pm on Sept 5, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Can't you just host your own on your domain?
2:13 pm on Sept 5, 2019 (gmt 0)

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No I'd like a 3rd party provider like Gmail Suite, etc. Is Godaddy good?
3:29 pm on Sept 5, 2019 (gmt 0)

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I would not do any business of any kind with Godaddy.

I have setup my own server on a separate 5$/mo vps using mail-in-a-box. It was really easy to deploy and now I have full control of my email.
6:52 am on Sept 6, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Gmail got a better security imo. Or look for a service that has mobile verification security.
1:20 pm on Sept 7, 2019 (gmt 0)

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I miss the days when google and microsoft provided that service for free.
2:10 am on Sept 9, 2019 (gmt 0)

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@creeking I think their fee for very comprehensive service worth it for business owners who wants that kind of email service.
10:00 pm on Sept 9, 2019 (gmt 0)

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@born2run: any specific needs?

Gmail, some limiting experiences regarding sending multiple mails. Godaddy... I will stay away from them.

About hosting your own, that's easy and cheap, but sometimes companies sell false stuff (ips falling on blacklist and thus unable to send mails).
11:00 pm on Sept 9, 2019 (gmt 0)

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A dedicated IP (you pay for that), a robust host, and your own email server is the best way to go. Most of what you need is already built in. Advantage? You are not linked to an ip or isp that might have problematic customers abusing the system(s) and thus get caught up in that. Your own email serve, while not trivial, is not that difficult to set up and you end up with complete control over the process and do not have to worry (much) about third parties tagging the stream or getting in the way (with whatever criteria they may apply).

If this is for bucks/income, do it yourself!
10:09 am on Sept 10, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Whatever, make sure it has SPF, DKIM and DMARC set up properly. A lot of otherwise valid email coming in on my server fails on at least one, often all three of those and often has to be whitelisted. Worst are schools, banks and accountants! :(

As mentioned above, not that difficult to set up your own, eg, Postfix, Dovecot, Spamassassin and Clam, possibly Squirrel for webmail, on a basic ubuntu server. Setting up a certificate is free using letsencrypt.
7:10 am on Sept 11, 2019 (gmt 0)

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I just run my email through my free Gmail account. I use cPanel, so I forward foo@example.com to bar@gmail.com, then in Gmail's settings I set the return email address to foo@example.com.

On my desktop I use Thunderbird, so I IMAP to the Gmail account and have the return email set to foo@example.com.

It's free, I have good security, and nobody's the wiser :-)
4:13 pm on Sept 11, 2019 (gmt 0)

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It's free, I have good security, and nobody's the wiser :-)

Except g ... they read everything that goes through their servers. You did get the memo, right? :)

g has a terrible track record for supporting, or even continuing!, their products/adventures over the years. This would worry me to no end.

That said, anyone doing serious ecommerce needs a dedicated mail ip as well as a dedicated server ip.
12:48 am on Sept 12, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Several years back, I was rebuilding a client's website and emailed him about switching the hosting to my server from his current designer's.

What's hilarious was that his current designer emailed him, too, and asked him not to switch! Which meant that they were actually reading all of their clients' emails. Or at least filtering for references to my company.

When called out on it, their old designer claimed that they did that as an added value, to help prevent scams and such. Ha!

Long story short, I guess your emails aren't going to be perfectly safe anywhere, unless you have a local dedicated server that no one else can access. Unless your internet provider could read them as they passed through? I don't know about that one, I've never been on that side of things. But even using a third party to supply a semi-managed server opens you up to them reading your emails.

My emails don't include anything private, so I really don't care if Google reads them. At least, no more so than I would care if my internet provider reads them.

Them discontinuing the service IS a concern, though. I originally switched because I had my emails hosted on my own server, but was always running in to issues with my emails being filtered as spam by the recipients. I never could find a reason for it, but sending them through Gmail helped a little... not a lot, but a little. If they stop offering it then it's not a major issue to just drag all of my emails from Gmail to something else via IMAP.
1:41 am on Sept 12, 2019 (gmt 0)

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My emails don't include anything private, so I really don't care if Google reads them.

Ahh Yes! The good old "I've got nothing to hide" rationalization.

The bad news is that even though you may not think you have anything to hide now at some point in the future you will come to the realization that somethings should have been hidden. This realization generally comes when it is too late, and when the person or entity from which it should have been hidden tells you, but you knew along we had access to this information.

Also remember that, you may not accord a high value to your privacy and to confidentiality of your conversation but your counter party (person you are sending email to) may have different opinion or need and your indifference may comprise that person's rights.

Gmail is not free, for the email service, your are exchanging the value of your privacy, which is intangible and difficult to set a monetary value too.

unless you have a local dedicated server that no one else can access.

Hence my post above. Setup your own server that you control.

Unless your internet provider could read them as they passed through?

Email is inherently unsecure and one should never send any confidential information as text in a message. Instead you can send the confidential information as an encrypted attachment.
3:43 am on Sept 12, 2019 (gmt 0)

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I still use free microsoft email for one of my domains (personal use). unfortunately, I only set up one email account. I did not expect to lose ability to create new accounts.

I should have created ten generic accounts, like admin@example.com, work@, archive@,.........
5:42 am on Sept 12, 2019 (gmt 0)

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Gmail is not free, for the email service, your are exchanging the value of your privacy

aka "when the service is free, you are the product"
5:59 pm on Sept 13, 2019 (gmt 0)

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There is nothing perfect :(

My setup: I have my own webserver/host etc. And I use my own email addresses, the problem is sometimes the IP gets blacklisted, sure it's my fault because it's cheap and I didn't choose the best company, well that's the trick... because this sort of things can happen and I experienced these over different webhosts, including issues caused by an error during configuration (after being upgraded to a new server or account, etc) or someone just forgot to do something. Yes, paying for a private IP address helps, but human error on configurations can also affect you.

Hotmail/Outlook is what I use, I set up my mails for specific forwarding. Only use a few set of specific email addresses for sending. The service in my case has been great and I don't use the webmail (too slow and bloated). Sadly their filters and rules only work NOW on their addresses, not on synced accounts.

I had clients hosted at my webserver experiencing such issues, they relied on email more than anything else, but sometimes clients also do questionable stuff sending gazillion amount of emails to their lists (regardless of you making clear NOT to do this), so... depending on your company the mail service could be turned off, penalized, or limited to X amount of emails per hour, per day, etc. Depending their policies such abuse can affect only one mailbox but [u]usually it will affect the whole account[/u]. Sure, if you don't host clients then that shouldn't be a problem, right? sometimes your own employees can do these things just because...

BTW once I got upgraded for free to a new server with multiple benefits... but email went down. After struggling with tech support they informed the server had a X email per hour limit. Surprisingly by mistake it was sent to 10... 10 emails per hour, I mean, such things can happen.


A client used Gmail, and I didn't like it. I was constantly asked to help them with their mail, many things went straight to the spam folder, and sometimes their account would be temporarily paused because someone sent something (that's what happens when the company that gives you something for free has multiple "services" reading your mail or... "safety filters" whatever).

Some ex business owner used Gmail paid services (hosting, email, etc). It wasn't that much different.
 

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