Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.158.248.112

Forum Moderators: IanTurner & engine

Message Too Old, No Replies

Does Brexit mean UK sites can get rid of Cookie Warnings?

     
8:37 pm on Aug 31, 2016 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Jan 13, 2014
posts:111
votes: 22


Now the UK is heading out the door of the EU does this mean we can finally switch off those ridiculous cookie warning statements on all uk domains. You know the ones that read "Our site uses Cookies Click here or fXXX Off".
8:57 pm on Aug 31, 2016 (gmt 0)

New User

5+ Year Member

joined:July 6, 2010
posts: 2
votes: 0


No. Firstly, the U.K. hasn't left the UK - not yet anyway. Secondly, all European legislation that applies only applies because it has been made law locally in the UK. In order to change that, the U.K. Parliament would need to amend the existing leglislation or enact new. Even if it did that, it would take years to go through everything and many laws would not be changed at all. The view of certain civil servants (Gus O'lDonnell for instance) is that there are so many pieces of legislations that will need amending, the most legislations will remain as is, permanently.
9:16 pm on Aug 31, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member beedeedubbleu is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Feb 3, 2004
posts: 6130
votes: 20


Who knows but it is worth mentioning that the Westminster government don't know yet what Brexit means. I mean it would have been daft to consider this before the referendum, wouldn't it?
9:32 pm on Aug 31, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Aug 30, 2002
posts: 2642
votes: 96


Isn't it scheduled to be replaced by the Rich Tea law? (Seriously though, the directive was adopted into UK law so until it is removed, it may be in effect.)

Regards...jmcc
3:52 am on Sept 1, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from GB 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Nov 16, 2005
posts:2773
votes: 112


In the short term, no, for the reasons explained above.

In the long term there is a good chance of getting rid of it as the ICO, at least, seems to realise how daft it is and dragged their feet on implementation.
7:08 am on Sept 1, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member beedeedubbleu is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Feb 3, 2004
posts: 6130
votes: 20


It is worth mentioning that cookie "law" is no more than hot air. There is no enforcement and no one has ever been prosecuted for a breach. It's a joke.
2:07 pm on Sept 1, 2016 (gmt 0)

Moderator This Forum from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts: 3642
votes: 46


My take on it is that it will be in force at least until the formal leaving of the EU (two years from invoking article 50). After that, if it is an act of parliament, then the wording of the act would need to be looked at to see if we could stop showing cookie consent to UK visitors.

Also I expect all laws that mention the EU will be looked at in light of Brexit by the new Brexit Ministry (otherwise known as the Ministry of Administrative Affairs).
3:25 pm on Sept 12, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from GB 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 5, 2006
posts:3446
votes: 55


There seems to be a false belief going around in some quarters that UK laws that implement EU regulations will become null and void when we leave.
3:36 pm on Sept 12, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 9, 2000
posts:25428
votes: 731


Yes, piatkow, i have been surprised to hear that from quite a few people. I'm not sure where they got that idea from.

Once the UK eventually exits, if it wants to trade with the EU it'll still need to meet the trading requirements, even if it decides to repeal some of the laws and regulations.

The cookie law is very unlikely to be dropped, and even if it was, it would a very long way down the list of laws and regulations that will require attention.
4:03 pm on Sept 12, 2016 (gmt 0)

Moderator This Forum from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator ianturner is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 19, 2001
posts: 3642
votes: 46


I would disagree with the cookie law being a long way down the list of laws that require attention. If you calculate the lost productivity from people having to spend the time to dismiss cookie messages, repealing the law will make the UK workforce more competitive compared to that in the EU.
4:25 pm on Sept 12, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 9, 2000
posts:25428
votes: 731


Oh, don't get me wrong, the cookie law was badly thought through and is a major annoyance for me and other having to click OK on every first time visit to a site. If you clear your cookies frequently you've got to click that agreement again. I'd love to see the back of it, but I doubt it will go, especially with the likelihood of websites serving EU audiences.
10:05 am on Sept 14, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from GB 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 5, 2006
posts:3446
votes: 55



The cookie law is very unlikely to be dropped, and even if it was, it would a very long way down the list of laws and regulations that will require attention.

Webmasters may think otherwise but in the grand scheme of things it will be a long way down behind a lot of agreements on physical trade.
10:19 am on Sept 14, 2016 (gmt 0)

New User

5+ Year Member

joined:July 6, 2010
posts: 2
votes: 0


Guys please also bear in mind that when a European Directive is enacted, this is a requirement for European states to enact their own lawa, it is not a law in itself. When that happened in this case, the UK implemented much tougher rules than almost all other countries with the exception of the Netherlands. In the end, it's a British law. You may also have forgotten that when it came into force, the first website which was forced to make changes was actually a British Gov't department one. The ONLY way that this law would be changed - in my view - would be if there was pressure to do some from British businesses. I don't see that many British businesses caring about it - and with the trend towards stricter and stricter privacy, it's really not likely any time in the next decade.
4:39 pm on Sept 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 9, 2000
posts:25428
votes: 731


Thanks andyatkinskrueger, and welcome back.

Yes, thanks for the clarification.

That law was an example of how it can be badly implemented, and a European version might have been better, however, that's how the EU works. Each member state has to have it's own law. They can, of course, make it stricter to meet their own local requirements, as per the examples you cited.

I think we, as webmasters, and also as users, all know it could have been significantly improved to avoid the annoyance.