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Report: Android OS Hit By 79 pct of Malicious Attacks

     
2:07 pm on Aug 28, 2013 (gmt 0)

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Some 79% of malicious attacks on mobiles in 2012 occurred on devices running Google's Android operating system, US authorities have said.

Public information website Public Intelligence published the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation memo to US police and emergency medical personnel.

Nokia's Symbian system, on the Finnish company's basic-feature handsets, had had the second-most malware attacks.

Apple's iOS had had 0.7% of attacks.Report: Android OS Hit By 79 pct of Malicious Attacks [bbc.co.uk]
2:47 pm on Aug 28, 2013 (gmt 0)

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Android is not any less secure. The main reason more attacks take place on Android is because you are free to download and install apps from anywhere, not just from the Play Store. Apple, on the other hand, has their apps on lock down.

Only download your apps from a trusted source and you'll be fine.
6:52 pm on Aug 28, 2013 (gmt 0)

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It's almost a who cares as phones, unlike desktop computers, are kind of disposable so an infected phone can be easily tossed as all the data is on the cloud. It's also easy to reset the phone to it's original factory condition for the same reasons as the apps and data are on the cloud and will quickly reload.

Sure you might lose a game score or two. tough.

There are anti-virus solutions for phones and I think if this becomes an epidemic of idiots infecting their phones that AV will come pre-installed in the near future.
8:44 pm on Aug 28, 2013 (gmt 0)

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Nothing surprising about that number, Android has about 80% of the market.
2:47 pm on Aug 29, 2013 (gmt 0)

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an infected phone can be easily tossed


It depends where you live - here in South Africa phones don't get tossed so easily!
3:23 pm on Aug 29, 2013 (gmt 0)

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It's almost a who cares as phones, unlike desktop computers, are kind of disposable so an infected phone can be easily tossed as all the data is on the cloud. It's also easy to reset the phone to it's original factory condition for the same reasons as the apps and data are on the cloud and will quickly reload.

I agree but that's our case, mostly us webmasters and not average users. I've seen too often of coworkers and friends: their phone is their home, so much preconfigured they even think twice before updating unless they are offered and upgrade service at the store to a new phone.
11:52 pm on Aug 30, 2013 (gmt 0)

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I have been a developer of iOS and Android apps, since end of 2009. I sometimes find it ironic all the talk of security and yet we all buy phones made in countries that aren't even that friendly to the west. What a wonderful spy system it could be if they could do a backdoor of some kind.

If you have a Apple device and Android device both powered down, they are equal in risk. But when you turn them on and do something....

I think Android is less secure than Apple based on the fact that you can do so much more of whatever you want. Apps aren't reviewed and checked (other than technical checks) so for example. A old app I have had for a couple of years, still top 50 in it's paid category, did a update. Now when you go into it, almost any button you touch sends you out to all kinds of wild foreign websites, locks of the phone and I have to kill the battery to get out of it. That app shouldn't be there and would be found on a actual review.

People could be more safe if they stuck to major websites and brand apps yeah, still a risk but not as much) but that isn't going to happen when FREE is around. People fall for stuff all the time.
7:08 am on Aug 31, 2013 (gmt 0)

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Linux is just as open as Android, uses mostly free software, and has an excellent track record.

Part of the problem is with closed source (unlike Linux) freeware. That is one reason I try F-Droid before I look in the Play Store.

Part of it is users that do not care, and install a huge amount of random stuff. Improving Play Store reviewing would help with this one problem.

Another problem is that many Android phones and tablets do not receive security updates to the OS, so holes are not fixed.

My approach is to limit what I do: no sensitive data on mobile devices, and all the installed software is either open source, or from a vendor I trust.