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New WiFi Frequency Set to Turbo Charge WiFi by 10 fold

     
12:12 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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[wired.com...]

Wi-Fi is about to lay claim to a new frequency band that could result in speeds at least 10 times faster than what’s currently available.

An agreement between the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Wireless Gigabit Alliance will let the Wi-Fi Alliance carve out specs and standards to support Wi-Fi operation in the 60-GHz frequency band in a bid to make Wi-Fi faster. By contrast, Wi-Fi today operates in the 2.4-GHz and 5- GHz bands.

Specifically, the move to 60 GHz could allow for speeds in the range of 1 gigabits per second to 6 gbps, in contrast to today’s theoretical maximum of 150 Mbps for 802.11n.
12:26 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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“The 60 GHz is like a beam of light — you have to have line of sight — but you can get multi-gigabit point-to point networking speeds with it,”

Line of sight - I suppose that means you can keep a check on what the kids are up to as they will no longer be able to access the wi-fi from their rooms. Of course once you stop them doing all those downloads and gaming you won't need the speed anyway!
12:31 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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There's some pretty severe physical limitations to these kinds of frequencies. I figure the average household might need at least two repeaters to keep the signal from getting lost in walls etc.
1:53 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Line of sight means you might as well just put in some ethernet cabling and get the same speed that way - and that would be more secure.
2:22 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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I can see line of sight working well in a large open office, but it would be useless in a multi-story home.

Wouldn't a "repeater" only work as a reflective surface such as a mirror? You would have to have perfectly angled mirrors placed around corners and stairways.
3:30 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Wouldn't a "repeater" only work as a reflective surface such as a mirror? You would have to have perfectly angled mirrors placed around corners and stairways.

It would need two antennae. One aimed at the point of origin (e.g. router) and one aimed at the direction of rebroadcast (e.g. a room). I don't see this technology taking off anywhere soon; even in an open office space one would need to get rid of obstacles like cubicle walls etc. I wonder how they're proposing to tackle this.
3:54 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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If you are in an office space just run gigabit ethernet.
6:24 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Line of sight means you might as well just put in some ethernet cabling and get the same speed that way - and that would be more secure.


And use less power too.
6:36 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Line of sight. That almost defeats the purpose of *wireless*
7:12 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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even in an open office space one would need to get rid of obstacles like cubicle walls etc. I wonder how they're proposing to tackle this


Hang it from the ceiling, like one of those spinning disco ball things? This only works on roofless cubicles.
8:04 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Line of sight. That almost defeats the purpose of *wireless*


Yep, it will have its uses but it probably won't be on the consumer end. You could use this to connect 2 buildings, us it to relay together access points etc. But not user joe at home on his laptop, atleast not easily.
11:09 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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You could use this to connect 2 buildings


Sounds like a great solution for college and work campus settings.
11:59 pm on May 10, 2010 (gmt 0)

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MrHard:
This only works on roofless cubicles

Are you saying that there are cubicles with roofs? Do you mean... rooms?
12:57 am on May 11, 2010 (gmt 0)

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Sounds like a great solution for college and work campus settings.


yes and no, the way i've always connected buildings was by droping some fiber in the ground. If this was not an option at all then sure this is awesome, just remember how easy it is to saturate gigabit when you have a ton of clients behind it.
10:39 am on May 11, 2010 (gmt 0)

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I can see some serious business needs for the capacity but "dead spots" for handheld kit in places like warehouses and supermarkets is already a problem.
2:26 pm on May 11, 2010 (gmt 0)

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The 60 GHz is like a beam of light — you have to have line of sight


AFAIK you have to have >60% of fresnel zone (elliptical area around the visual line of sight between two antennas).

Looks like it only for outdoor networks with dish or parabolic antennas?
10:30 pm on May 13, 2010 (gmt 0)

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The 60ghz band is a LONG way from the visible light spectrum. Light is around 400000ghz - 500000ghz.

The main disadvantage that the 60ghz band has is that oxygen will absorb some of the RF at this frequency range. I don't know how much this affects range in low power short range devices. The main advantages are that, like the 2.4 and 5 ghz bands, it's already open for unlicensed use, and with more frequencies to use, the possibility for higher bandwidths.

Antennas for this band are very small. An array of antennas might barely be bigger than a single 2.4ghz antenna, so with the right antenna designs, I would think range will probably be as good or better than we have now.

We already use 40ghz, 71-76ghz, 81-86ghz and 92-95ghz for high bandwidth point to point communications, but all these bands require a license. The 60ghz band could open up more consumer friendly point to point equipment. Sounds cool to me.