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App Usage Dominates iPhone and Android

Should webmasters become appmasters?

   
5:42 pm on Dec 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



The majority of iPhone users, along with 44% of Android users, spent at least one-half of their time with applications rather than a browser.

[emarketer.com...]

Does this mean that it will require webmasters to supply apps for their sites to become successful on iPhone and Android?

Looking at the list of apps supplied by everyone from Amazon to Yelp it would appear that the best way to engage the audience on these devices is to provide a superior customized app experience vs. letting them wander through the browser.

The iPhone App Store and Android Market provide additional visibility by promoting and encouraging potential customers to download your apps.

So that's the question: Apps vs. Website?

Which will ultimately dominate these phones and will more webmasters join the app fray?

8:09 pm on Dec 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Until there is a way to search internet for mobile specific sites/apps, the app stores are essential, from developer's view, if you're are targeting iphone/android niche.

Besides that, the apps are way more interactive than websites and account for 100,000 where websites are in billions...

so, apps!

9:04 pm on Dec 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Forget apps in the long term, basic websites will win hands down in the end.
9:08 pm on Dec 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



What about just a simple app that does nothing more than launch your mobile enabled site in a browser, something you can build in a day.

The end user would certainly not be the wiser and you would get additional exposure in the app store, free marketing.

Best yet, you get a nice big icon on their mobile phone opposed to all the competition stored in a very long list of bookmarks.

3:38 am on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



From incrediBill:
Does this mean that it will require webmasters to supply apps for their sites to become successful on iPhone and Android?

I don't think building your own website apps for the iPhone app store or Android market will intrigue many. However, I do think webmasters will need to consider building mobile versions of their current sites--especially if others in their niches begin building slim, sleek looking mobile designs.

I was just looking at WML and XHTML-MP code today, and I'm considering creating a mobile version of my most popular website.

4:33 am on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Google is not going to make Apps anymore they are only going to make mobile browser app.
1:51 pm on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



At least from a travel perspective, roaming bills are a big issue if you're planning on sending a user to a web within the phone. Apps allow you to put aside the need for connectivity and thus protect the user from the mega bills.
1:59 pm on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I agree incrediBILL. An app as you describe is just another avenue for marketing your site.
I also see admob ads on some apps. Google is buying AdMob.
I think Google sees the opportunity too.
6:54 pm on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Apps allow you to put aside the need for connectivity and thus protect the user from the mega bills.

You better be careful which apps you use then because that's a big misconception.

Apps from Yelp, Amazon, Where, Google, etc. all use the web to access the data, so you're roaming the web.

Even that little weather widget uses the web to get weather updates.

8:47 pm on Dec 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



True enough about apps. Many of them depend on a constant connection. For many apps that are connected to a website, that might be in their best interest.

I happen to be working on an occasionally-connected app for Android - not related to a particular website.

One thing to note - people spending half their time browsing is probably an *increase* from previous times.

People using Windows Mobile 2003 probably spent closer to 0% of their time browsing and most of their time on apps. Partly because the browser sucked and partly because data plans weren't as common.

So having your website ready for mobile traffic is still important.

Everyone but me, though, stay away from apps. ;) Just send me your best app ideas and I'll worry about wasting the time and losing the money for you. After all, there is no need to cause consumer confusion if your app happens to be in a similar niche to mine. ;)

7:25 pm on Jan 6, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I've had an iPhone for over 2 years now. I have about 60 apps installed. I use the web browser (Safari) about 90% of my time on the phone. Email about 5%, and the other apps about 5%.

Yes, there are tons of apps and games, but lots of folks still love to browse the web! ;-)

 

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