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Need some tips to install Ubuntu Dual Boot

For Linux beginner...

     
2:17 pm on Oct 24, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I am a Linux beginner... Well, not yet, since I haven't install it yet :)

I want to install Ubuntu Dual Boot on Vista this WE, but like any Windows newbie, I am bit afraid of messing up the all thing.

Anyway, just few questions, I have read somewhere this morning that I need 4 partitions (one for Vista, one for Linux, one with a swap and one with data that can be read both by Linux and Windows)...

Do I really need to create these extension or will the LiveCD from Ubuntu to all the work for me ?

What is a swap partition ? Is it really needed with the latest Ubuntu (Dual Boot) ?

And a dumb question to finish, does it mean that my files in Vista will not be found by Linux if I don't do a "shared" disk (the one with data that can be read both by Linux and Windows).

Thanks for your help.

Tomda

5:55 pm on Oct 24, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I'm not very familiar with Ubuntu or Vista, but generally, here's how it works:

If you want to be able to share files between Windows and Linux, then yes, you'll want four partitions. Or if you want to save hard drive space, you could stick with three partitions, and use a USB stick for file sharing.

First, install Windows, creating one partition that's only as big as you want for Windows. If you install Linux first, then Windows will overwrite the Linux boot loader, and you'll have to use a Linux rescue disk to recover it.

Then, install Linux. Give it a root partition which you'll use for all of your Linux-only files. Also create a swap partition, which should usually be twice as big as the amount of RAM. This is what Linux uses for virtual memory. On some systems you can get away without swap, but you'll almost always want it.

When you create the partitions, look for an option that says "Force partition primary". When I have four partitions or less, I always check that on every partition to make things simpler.

Now, this leaves some empty space for your shared partition. I would leave it empty, and create it in Windows later.

Without the shared partition, Linux might be able to read your Windows partition, but Windows wouldn't be able to see the Linux partition.

6:50 am on Oct 27, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Thank you Mcavic !
6:57 pm on Oct 27, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



No problem!
 

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