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I hired a logo designer - is vector a standard offering?

     
3:50 pm on Jan 31, 2012 (gmt 0)

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I hired someone to design a logo for my LLC. The finished product included jpgs whose largest size was 750 px wide at 200 dpi and gifs whose largest size was 580 px at 72 dpi.

I was under the impression that vector graphics were standard in the industry in case I needed to use the images for print.

I was billed US$250 and I wonder if this is reasonable considering no images were vector?
4:30 pm on Jan 31, 2012 (gmt 0)

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What did you ask for in the RFP? The deliverables should be explicit. Even so, @ 300 DPI the largest version should be fine at 3.75 inches.

I'd agree it should be standard, and generally is vectored, but the issue is most people don't have programs to read vectored art programs like Illustrator or Freehand. So general delivery is usually in a format most clients can view.

The other complication is in the agreement of terms of use - some artists maintain rights to the original artwork and are licensing your usage for explicit purposes. If your RFP was for all rights, all original art should be yours.

It all depends on the RFP and agreement.
5:01 pm on Jan 31, 2012 (gmt 0)

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@ 300 DPI the largest version should be fine at 3.75 inches


The jpgs are at 200 dpi - and the 3.75 inches should be fine for what usage? That sounds small for printing purposes.
5:55 pm on Feb 1, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Sorry had my math wrong. :-) It's 2.5 inches. Yes they are 300 DPI, but 300 DPI is the average for up to 150 LPI (screen lines per inch in printing) screens. If you do the math (correctly :-) ),

750 pixels / 200 = 3.75 inches

750 pixels / 300 = 2.5 inches

Adjust appropriately for cm. Even that can be "stretched." We used to use 250 DPI images for 150 LPI printing with no noticeable image decomposition.
6:06 pm on Feb 1, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Maybe I'm not understanding something, but wouldn't letterhead, flyers, and many other print media require more than 3.75"?
5:12 pm on Feb 2, 2012 (gmt 0)

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I wouldn't think so, but you'd need larger than 2.5" for say, a report cover, billboards, TV ads.
7:31 pm on May 3, 2012 (gmt 0)

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If he was giving you bitmap files, he should have sent something with PNG with a transparency around the logo and within the artwork if there are holes. JPG is completely unacceptable.

A vector illustration from Illustrator is what should ultimately have been sent to you. We can't discuss prices, but you didn't pay much for your logo.