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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Bucks!

Its all about the visual presentation...

   
1:47 pm on Feb 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I like to consider myself an avid online shopper. I'll probably make 90% of my purchases online this year.

While browsing various stores for products I've found that those who can show me an "ENLARGED" view of the product along with a "DECENT" (not lowest) price are the ones to secure my business. And, I'm a returning customer once I purchase and everything went as planned.

We're at a stage where (as of 2007 January) 50% of users have their resolution set to 1024x768 or greater. Less than 15% are at 800x600 and a whopping 25% or more are greater than 1024x768.

What's that mean for the store owner? Think "BIG"! Think Web 2.0 (as they call it). Think nice crisp 800 to 1000 pixel wide images. Show me a visual that will capture my attention and cause me to "ADD TO CART".

Don't do what some of the larger players are doing and give me an enlarged image that is 5 to 10% bigger than the normal sized one. Thats not an enlargement. Thats enough to make me go "ARRRGGGHHH" and head somewhere else to find a "BIGGER PICTURE".

Today, A Picture is Worth a Thousand Bucks! Its all about the visual presentation. That enlarged (SHOW DETAIL) image is going to help me make my purchase. ;)

2:41 pm on Feb 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



A Picture is Worth a Thousand Bucks!

It is. I do passionately agree with every single word of yours.
And I strongly hope that the time of those representative and "selling" pictures is to come very soon.

9:44 pm on Feb 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rocknbil is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I so totally agree with this.

Additionally, I'm finding out the inverse is true.

People don't like to read. When I'm shopping, before I lay down my hard-earned greenbacks, I READ the fine print, the return policies, what I'm buying, where my money goes. I make SURE I'm buying what I think I'm buying.

Sadly, this doesn't appear to be true for most shoppers. A simple line such as "zip code required for US orders" (to calculate shipping) or "Login not required to order" even when marked in larger RED TYPE causes our phone to ring and an Internet order to convert to a phone order.

The more text we remove or convert to a graphic representation of some sort, the more conversions we are seeing. Sometimes I wish I could just do it for them. :-)

1:34 pm on Feb 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



People don't like to read.

Unfortunately, I have to agree with that.

Anyway, reading is fundamental but if pictures quality progresses even slightly (I don't believe that it will enhance to a great extent...soon), probably it will lead to great results. And customers more content with what they've bought, of course...
Hope that many e-shop owners would read what we write here...Who knows.

5:08 pm on Feb 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



People don't like to read.

I think that all depends on what they are shopping for. This is where a balance has to be established between the readers and the scanners. Is the most important stuff ATF (Above the Fold)? Is that image highly visible? Crisp? Color correct? Can I Add to Cart without scrolling vertically? Can I search without scrolling vertically?

Those are just a few of the things I think about. If you take that product page and make the top portion the "meat" of it (for the scanners) and then utilize the bottom portion for the rest of it (the readers), you've addressed the bulk of your audience, including the non-human ones. ;)

11:50 pm on Feb 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rocknbil is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



When you say "product page" I am assuming product detail, so yes to all. :-) But we've found on the initial results or categories pages the text is lost on shoppers.

For example, whether accessed via search or linked categories (both must be available, some shoppers are drill-down link click oriented, some search-trained), ATF on the initial products pages is a skinny header, and if they are in one of the qualifying categories, "FREE WIDGET ACCESSORY with your $100 order, $10 value." This is followed by the first three rows of products, each with only a thumbnail and add to cart. The pages are two screens deep (including ATF.)

We have received many orders that qualify and we ask if they want a Silver or Gold widget accessory because they didn't specify. "OH! I get a FREE one? I didn't know that! Cool, make it Green!"

"They only come in gold or silver."

OK I embellished the last sentence. But you get the idea. :-) We've found the more text we eliminated from the initial pages the less confused people seemed to be. For the readers - they can click the picture or the little icon that says "More >>" (of course, without "click here." :-) )

9:31 am on Feb 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I think that all depends on what they are shopping for. This is where a balance has to be established between the readers and the scanners.

Very valuable distinction, I may say. Great.

 

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