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Does Campaign CTR Matter?

     
5:05 am on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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I have a specific campaign that has been running for about 3 months now. About a month ago, I paused all of my broad match terms and the CTR has since doubled.

Would it make sense to copy the campaign (with broad match terms still paused - or deleted) into a new campaign?

Couple questions...

1) Does CAMPAIGN click-through rate matter?
2) If so, would you recommend copying the existing campaign into a new campaign?

1:06 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Why copy the campaign at all? A new campaign will not have any history so it would need to start from scratch. Is there a reason why you want to setup a new campaign based on this campaign?

In my opinion, CTR is only important when taken into account with other performance indicators. For example, if you had an ad which said, "free plasma tvs", I suspect that you would have a pretty high CTR no matter what. The question is if those clicks are converting in the end.

Are your clicks important or are what those clicks doing in the end important?

2:09 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Google takes into account CTR of individual keywords indirectly through Quality score, and also takes into account overall CTR and history of your account. So assuming you are happy with the way your account currently performs then there is no need to copy the keywords into a new campaign. It is unlikely to offer you any further benefit except to clean up your account.
3:02 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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nakita_dog: A new campaign will not have any history so it would need to start from scratch.

Valid point. If campaign CTR mattered, then creating a new campaign would theoretically result in a higher CTR given that broad match terms would be removed. That being said, however, initial positioning, quality score, and discounted clicks would be out of the question.

nakita_dog: In my opinion, CTR is only important when taken into account with other performance indicators. For example, if you had an ad which said, "free plasma tvs", I suspect that you would have a pretty high CTR no matter what.

The next reply from matmarsden refutes that... somewhat.

matmarsden: Google takes into account CTR of individual keywords indirectly through Quality score, and also takes into account overall CTR and history of your account.

And I think this next quote sums it up perfectly (for my purposes):

matmarsden: So assuming you are happy with the way your account currently performs then there is no need to copy the keywords into a new campaign. It is unlikely to offer you any further benefit except to clean up your account.
4:06 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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As matmarsden said, if you are happy (even if you are not), there is no need and no benefit of copying a campaign.

> and also takes into account overall CTR and history of your account.

He's not the first to say that but I don't believe this. I see no evidence. If true, the weight is extremely small and therefore can easily be overcome. I also don't see the logic of using historical CTR for a whole account and apply it to the specifics of a keyword and ad.

6:52 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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LucidSW - I had to go double check myself but see below extract and page link from the Google Adword help center.

The performance of the keyword's ad group or campaign does not have extra weight in determining its Quality Score. Quality Score does, however, factor in the historical CTR of your entire account.

[adwords.google.co.uk...]

I cant find any reference to the weight it lends to this though, but as you say it could be minimal.

8:54 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

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> The performance of the keyword's ad group or campaign does not have extra weight in determining its Quality Score. Quality Score does, however, factor in the historical CTR of your entire account.

Does this not seem contradictory to you? It does to me.

In one sentence, the performance (which I take as being the CTR, what else would it be?) of the group or campaign is NOT used in determining QS. Yet in the next sentence, your account is. An account is composed of campaigns and groups.

1:43 pm on Oct 21, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Yes, I agree performance is CTR (unless somebody knows something else?).

With regards to the potential contradiction, I know what you mean. However based on the other bullet on that page I think they do this, so regardless of what you do you cannot reset that keywords CTR. So if you deleted it, paused or moved it, they can still use the historical data once its used again to formulate part of the QS. I think its just done to encompass everything, no room for error. At least thatīs what it looks like to me :-)

> Other Bullet: Quality Score factors in a keyword's historical click-through rate (CTR) on Google. The AdWords system will remember a keyword's historical CTR, even if you delete and re-add it or move it to a different ad group. This is true even though the keyword's visible account statistics are reset to zero.

6:30 pm on Oct 21, 2009 (gmt 0)

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> Quality Score factors in a keyword's historical click-through rate (CTR) on Google.

That I knew, although again, it's very cryptic. Googlese.

You can't create a metric such as QS and not compare it to something else. Your QS is calculated based on the performance to those of others for that keyword, now and historically.

It would be like the first to suggest creating the batting average to a player. You tell him his average is 280. He doesn't know what that means, if it's good or bad. You have to compare it to what other players are hitting. Continuing the analogy, a 280 average would be QS of 6, 300 a QS of 7, 320 a QS of 8, 340 QS of 9 and anything above 360 would be a QS of ten.