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If Bid too Low for Search will it appear on Content?

     
9:02 pm on Jul 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

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If Adwords claims that a bid is too low to appear in searches, I'm wondering if it will still appear inside of content? I don't have a lot to spend starting out.

Thanks.

2:55 pm on July 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

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It might but no guarantee. Two comments here:

1. You ad can appear in searches. It just won't be on first page. I'm assuming you are talking about the "first page bid" message.

2. Create separate campaigns for search and content.

5:16 pm on July 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Hey thanks for the answer Lucid,

What will creating a separate campaign for search and content accomplish?

By the way, it is the "first page" message, I am still seeing some clicks and impressions in search (despite the message) but hardly anthing in content (don't know if it takes time to kick in).

Thanks.

9:58 pm on July 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

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You don't want to mix search and content. They are two different things, behave differently, so the way you optimize must be different.

You'll still get impressions because your bid may be close enough to get onto the first page or other variables such as some advertisers pausing during certain times of the day. You'll certainly get impressions if the searcher checks beyond the first page. The message doesn't stop your ads from showing, it simply tells you that you may not get a whole lot of impressions if they are on page two or three.

1:29 am on July 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Awesome, thanks Lucid.
9:16 pm on July 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

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What will creating a separate campaign for search and content accomplish?

Lucid has given you excellent advice.

Just want to try to explain the logic behind that approach. I haven't the patience yet to properly tailor my campaigns for Content so consider this my general impressions and experience.

*****************

"Search" - be it on google.com or Google Search Partners is generally keyword based (some apparent exceptions with Search Partners).

On the "Content" network, remember people are not searching for your keywords. They are not searching at all in many cases.

Your ad will appear on pages that Google believes the combo of your ad, landing page, keywords and even the Adgroup name (as I was recently informed!) are themed around.

If you simply place your current Search keyword oriented Adgroup on the Content Network with no further strategy, you're likely to get millions of impressions or near zero impressions. Probably few desirable clickthroghs however.

Without a "plan", at best you'll simply appear as an Adsense ad on pages that probably have little to nothing to do with what you are trying to offer folks.

*****************

Just an example, but if you sell "funeral widgets" and go into Content blindly, you're likely to appear in Adsense blocks beneath, say, news stories about people who died recently. Probably not your target audience ;)

Also, since on Content, even with a well honed campaign and especially a compelling ad, you have a harder job to do to get the reader to look at your ad.

Your ad is either on a page that wasn't a result of a search for your product or you'll be on a page where a seller of widgets similar to yours has placed Adsense.

With the latter, you'll show on a page selling widgets or widget accessories similar to what you offer. You have to stand out on that page with a better deal than what the page is offering as well as the several other Adsense ads likely selling similar product. Remember, you only have 105 characters to make your case!

*****************

Hence, the very wise, solid advice to tailor separate campaigns for "Search" vs. "Content".

Search this forum for tips on how to accomplish a well-placed "Content" campaign.

*****************

Israel

12:08 am on July 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

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> Your ad will appear on pages that Google believes the combo of your ad, landing page, keywords and even the Adgroup name (as I was recently informed!) are themed around.

I don't know about theme around the ad group name. That's new to me. You have a reference?

But yes, Israel is correct. That is if you target sites using keywords. There is another way, which is better in my opinion, yet advertisers don't seem to be aware of: don't use keywords, target specific sites. Find out which sites that people visit that are a good fit to what you sell. Example, you sell dog products, find and target sites talking about dogs and just dogs.

Not only don't mix search and content, don't mix the two targeting types in content if you use both. By the way, using the keyword approach is a great way to find sites you want to target. Simply run a placement report, check each site and add those you want in your site targeting content campaign.

3:10 am on July 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

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I don't know about theme around the ad group name. That's new to me. You have a reference?

Hey, that was new to me too. Blew me away as I'd been inclined to think of the AdGroup name as a "memo" field. I'd name and rename using things like "widgets so so", "widgets old, "widgets good", etc.

AFAIK, it's not against TOS to cite a WebmasterWorld thread, so take a look at this recent thread and see what you think:

[webmasterworld.com...]

Israel

8:11 am on July 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Well explained Israel,

I agree - content and search campaigns should always be kept separate.

Another reason for keeping them separate is the URLs. Like you said, search campaigns are keyword based, so users are directed to the URL of the keyword. Content, however, is theme based, so users are sent through to the URL of the ad.

Therefore, if both search and content are kept together, it is impossible to specify individual keyword level URLs.

Alan

11:28 pm on July 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

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You can name ad groups whatever you like. Of course, you'd choose a name that makes sense to you. But if it helps Google figure out your theme, so much the better.

I respect Netmeg's opinion. She's been around a while at WebmasterWorld. But I'm not entirely convinced that Google would use your group's name in figure out your theme, 20 or so keywords should be enough anyway.

3:22 pm on July 27, 2009 (gmt 0)

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FWIW, I got that tip about the ad group name in a Google sponsored seminar.