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Content Campaign - Keywords Match Type

Does using all three make a difference?

     
9:02 pm on Dec 4, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Hi All,

I have been running some test campaigns in the content network for a while, and I wonder what match types do you use for your keywords in a content-only campaign.

Logically, as the whole idea is based on themes, I should be using only one match type (i.e. broad) however, from my tests, I got the feeling that if I apply, for each keyword, all the three match types (exact, phrase & broad) I get more impressions.

Do you think that's true? Do you know what Google officialy suggests to use for a content network campaign? I tried to search for it online, but couldn't find anything related.

This makes a big difference for big campaigns with a lot of keywords, as using the three match types means 3 times the number of keywords..

Thanks,
emoshe

9:43 pm on Dec 4, 2007 (gmt 0)

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It never made any difference in any of mine.
9:47 pm on Dec 4, 2007 (gmt 0)

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It makes no difference, just use broad match.
11:53 pm on Dec 4, 2007 (gmt 0)

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cool, thanks - that's what I hoped to hear :)

although I must say again that I had an adgroup that didn't do so well and after adding phrase & exact matches for all the keyword, it got many more impressions.. what I thought then is maybe google's bot sees the additional 2 matches of the keywords as a positive vote, which makes it get more impressions..

12:25 am on Dec 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

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In another current thread on the content network, I posted a bit of advice about creating keyword lists for success in the content network - and it seems worth repeating here:

[...] I'd suggest using a smallish number of keywords per ad group, all of which are about exactly the same thing as 1) your ad, and 2) the theme of the type of page on which you'd like that ad to appear.

When I say smallish, I mean around 20 or fewer - probably no more than 50 at the outside.

A bit more general info:

Tips for Success on the Content Network:
[adwords.google.com...]

Here's the thread to which I referred above:

[webmasterworld.com...]

AWA

10:00 am on Dec 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Thanks AWA. So can you confirm that for my content network keywords I can use only broad match, and using the other matches won't do any good?
3:40 am on Dec 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Thanks AWA. So can you confirm that for my content network keywords I can use only broad match, and using the other matches won't do any good?

This is kind of a tough call, emoshe.

In my opinion, using all three may types will tend to give slightly more focus to that keyword. However, in a world in which every advantage seems to have an offsetting disadvantage (isn't that Physics or something?) this also means that the other kewyords in your list might get slightly less focus or weight.

Bottom line, this amounts to your call, I think.

AWA

6:28 am on Dec 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

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In my opinion, using all three may types will tend to give slightly more focus to that keyword.

Hello AWA - Long time, no see!

Can you please expand a bit more on this comment? I thought I understood how content groups were matched (more or less), but this flies in the face of several of my assumptions.

If possible, might you be able to expand on an example of how this practice might be used...

Example Content keywords:

[Widgets]
"Widgets"
Widgets"
[Brand New Widgets]
[Brand New Widget]
Refurbished Widgets
"Pre-Owned Widgets"
Pre-Owned Widgets

What are some ways that the unique match type setting for these keywords could be strategically used to better match against the appropriate type of Widget sites?

12:31 pm on Dec 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Thank you AWA for the clarification..
8:54 pm on Dec 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Hello AWA - Long time, no see!

True enough! Though I always enjoy seeing your name in this forum. ;)

Can you please expand a bit more on this comment? [...]

I regret that I am not really able to expand on this, poster_boy, for two reasons:

First, this is something of an edge-case scenario about which I have already posted to the limits of my own personal knowledge. And, to go much farther via research would probably lead me into competitively sensitive territory, while also potentially getting the engineers (who are pretty busy this time of year) a little irritated at my persistence. ;)

Basically, I was trying to give emoshe as straightforward an answer as I could to his or her question - and I probably should have used the word 'may' rather than the word 'will' in the sentence "In my opinion, using all three may types will tend to give slightly more focus to that keyword."

That said, do I recommend doing it? No, not really.

I am a big fan of leveraging the basics: I suggest to advertisers that they create a short list of 20 or so keywords that are laser focused on the same theme as their ad and the type of site on which you'd like that ad to appear.

Then I suggest that they 'protect' that short and golden list of keywords with appropriate negatives.

If they have other keywords in mind that are only 'sort of' related to the keywords in the golden list, then I'd suggest creating another ad group with a short list of keywords that are laser focused on the theme of that keyword - and the type of site on which they'd like to have that ad appear.

poster_boy, I know you to be a very sophisticated advertiser, so the information above and below might not be particularly new to you - but for those who'd like to explore optimizing for the content network, I'd suggest taking a look at a recent three part series on this subject in the Inside AdWords blog. While the WebmasterWorld Forum81 charter prevents me from linking to the blog, I think I can mention the names of the posts, and have done so below. It it turns out I am incorrect, I know the mods will adjust my post. ;)

The third post, as the subject line suggests, covers keywords - including negatives.

* Google content network tips: Part 1 - Recent improvements

* Google Content Network Tips: Part 2 - Targeting Options, Environments, and Ad Formats

* Google Content Network Tips: Part 3 Optimizing your keywords for the content network

AWA