Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 34.207.78.157

Forum Moderators: martinibuster

Desktop RPM=$10, Mobile RPM=$1

Can Anything Be Done?

     
6:42 pm on Feb 7, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 29, 2003
posts:867
votes: 37


My site is responsive - Just one HTTPS URL for every page. Updated daily.
Ads are mostly 300 rectangle, 250 square and Responsive (troublesome- often too wide, or vertically collapsed with no ad).
I'm going back to all 300x250.

The discrepancy between RPM on Desktop and Mobile is continuing to expand.
I get 2-3 times the views/ impressions on Mobile than on Desktop.
It sure would be nice to get my Mobile RPM to climb up near my Desktop RPM.

Any thoughts? Tricks?
Or is that just the "state of the union" for this parameter, about which nothing can be done?
Are Desktop clicks REALLY worth 10 times Mobile clicks?
Thanks for any insight on this.
.
7:28 pm on Feb 7, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 1, 2016
posts:2548
votes: 717


Responsive != mobile optimized. Today more people should be coming to your website with mobile devices. Ideally your website should be built such that content can be consumed on a mobile screen, responsiveness is then used to adjust the content to a desktop view, hence "Mobile First". Are there critical page elements such as links buttons and images that are pushing down these elements off the screen into sub-optimal locations? What do other metrics between the two platforms tell you. How are your bounce rates, pages per session, etc...?

Very important what is your viewability on desktop vs mobile? If ads are not seen they are not clicked? Check "Active Viewable" stats in AdSense.

Responsive (troublesome- often too wide, or vertically collapsed with no ad).

This certainly doesn't help. If ads are not displaying correctly one can't expect users to be clicking on them. Be sure to adjust the code as needed to fit the requirements of your page.

Are Desktop clicks REALLY worth 10 times Mobile clicks?

Not in my case, Desktop is worth more but by a much lower margin less than 2X but it varies month to month.
8:13 pm on Feb 7, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Sept 25, 2005
posts:2091
votes: 370


RPM is not a very good indicator of what clicks are worth. It's the value of a click combined with the number of times people have actually clicked (CTR). Although CPM ads are also part of the equation, of course.

Last month, my CPC for mobile was actually higher than on desktop, by about 10%. However, mobile CTR is about half of desktop, so the RPM ends up being only 60% of the desktop RPM.

What do other metrics between the two platforms tell you.

I'd look into this as well, particularly traffic sources.
4:06 pm on Feb 8, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 29, 2003
posts:867
votes: 37



@NickMNS - "... responsiveness is then used to adjust the content to a desktop view, hence "Mobile First"
As I understand it, Desktop rendering is full-scale, and the viewport parameter is only used by smaller screens to reduce the size, TO FIT. Which would mean that "responsiveness is then used to adjust the content to MOBILE VIEW, not the other way around. Every page viewport is adjusted to render a 100% score on the Google mobile emulators, WHERE POSSIBLE. Some of my pages are quite data heavy (wide), and simply are not intended for small screens.

Bing webmaster tools, on the other hand, does not seem to know what the "Viewport" parameter is, and pays no attention to it. So, all my pages fail their mobile page width parameters, since their only consideration is for Desktop pages. Some Google emulators ALSO ignore the viewport parameter, and render the page the same size as Desktop (not responsive at all). Varvy emulation is good at using the viewport parameter properly.

The ads are seen all right, as they are all above the fold.
My Alexa bounce rate has been 88% for 16 years.
Time on site is less than 2 minutes.
The visitor visits, get what they want, and leave.

Pages visited is less than 1.5.
Search CTR is around 3% overall, and ad CTR, is about the same.

@robzilla -
Mobile CTR = about 2%, Desktop CTR= about 4%.
Google still makes us calculate EPC, a PITA. Do they think we are not going to check?
Elevendy thousand numbers, and they refuse to show the one we are most interested in?
We must "Go fish" for our NECESSARY data (calculate it).
.
6:22 pm on Feb 8, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 1, 2016
posts:2548
votes: 717


As I understand it, Desktop rendering is full-scale, and the viewport parameter is only used by smaller screens to reduce the size, TO FIT.

You interpretation is not correct. The meta viewport tag when set to 1 tells the browser to maintain the size ratio 1:1 that is for whatever screen width 100% width == full size of that screen. So if you have small screen on your device and your website is designed to be say 1000 pixels at full size (desktop) , the viewport == 1 setting will prevent your browser from reducing the size to fit elements onto the smaller screen. Assuming a phone size 333px (for simple calcs) This means that for 1000px wide body width only 1/3 of the page would be visible. Without it, it would take a 1000px and reduce it to 333px, the entire page would visible but it would be shrunk by 1/3 making the elements unreadable.

The viewport tag is one minor component required to a make a page responsive. The main means of achieving responsiveness is by using Media queries in your CSS. What these do is assign different styling to elements on the page as a function of screen size. This is where the concept of mobile first comes into play. A mobile first layout will be such that the layout without any media queries will display correctly. This generally entails limiting the width of your page elements to 320 or 360 px, and arranging the content in mostly stacked configuration, one very tall column. Then as screen sizes grow, you can split up the column into 2 or 3 wide.

There is an opposite strategy, where one can layout the content for desktop and then collapse elements into narrower formats and eventually into a single column. This was preferred practice when this technique was first put use (circa 2013?) . In addition to resizing and styling many designers would also hide content on for small devices. Back then most web traffic came from desktop. Now it is the opposite.

In 2019 Google is crawling and indexing websites with a mobile crawler and using the mobile "image" as the gauge on which to rank the website. Hide content on mobile is no longer a good practice.

Furthermore, I believe that simple collapsing content into a single column is not great for user experience and certainly sucks for displaying ads. Simply because the content will take up the entire view and thus ads will rarely be seen. The concept of "Above the Fold" is nearly meaningless on a mobile screen. User's scroll, and scroll fast they will often scroll past the ATF content before it has time to load, specailly ads. Remember that just because an impression is recorded doesn't mean that the user actually sees the ad. Users can't click ads without seeing them. And if the can or do then you have bigger issues than low RPM.

I believe that one must optimize ones content for mobile. Ads must be placed a close as possible to key content and the content should be displayed in such a way that it can be consumed with minimal scrolling. I like to use carousels, but you content will dictate how thing should be arranged.


My Alexa bounce rate has been 88% for 16 years.
Time on site is less than 2 minutes.
The visitor visits, get what they want, and leave.

You overall stats, bounce rate, time on site etc.. is of little importance. For each metric, you need to look at the difference between mobile users and desktop users. In terms of AdSense arguably the most important metric is AVV Active View Viewable. Check out the difference between mobile and desktop for AVV, you will be shocked.

Google still makes us calculate EPC, a PITA.

In AdSense CPC == EPC.

I disagree with Robzilla, it is absolutely correct to use RPM over CPC or CTR, as RPM is a standardized metric making much easier to compare in a like for like manner. CTR & CPC only covers a portion of the total impressions and are very much biased by the number of volume of impressions a CPC of $2.00 for 10 impressions is not the same as CPC of $0.20 for 10k impressions.
10:18 pm on Feb 8, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tangor is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Nov 29, 2005
posts:9714
votes: 925


Are Desktop clicks REALLY worth 10 times Mobile clicks?


Could it be that ads are 10 times more visible than mobile? :)

They stay on screen for longer periods than on mobile
11:31 pm on Feb 8, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Sept 25, 2005
posts:2091
votes: 370


it is absolutely correct to use RPM over CPC or CTR, as RPM is a standardized metric making much easier to compare in a like for like manner. CTR & CPC only covers a portion of the total impressions and are very much biased by the number of volume of impressions

The point was that RPM doesn't really tell you anything when you're comparing desktop and mobile performance. It doesn't help you understand why desktop RPM is $10 and mobile RPM is $1, whereas CPC and CTR are likely to tell you just that; people are clicking less on mobile and/or advertisers aren't as interested in your mobile traffic.
12:10 am on Feb 9, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 1, 2016
posts:2548
votes: 717


@robzilla
I disagree. As I mentioned RPM is a standardized metric that means that you can easily use it across features, like comparing different websites, different pages, or different traffic sources. The mobile and desktop platform can differ considerably in the the type of ads served and the number of impressions. For me >90% of my mobile impressions are CPC, whereas for desktop at ~75% CPC, paired that with fewer desktop pages views. This results in a significant difference in the number of impressions.

The other issue is that I honestly could care less whether a user clicks on an ad or simply views the ad. What matters to me is that I revenue is maximized. Focusing on only CPC is short sighted. RPM incorporates all bid-types.

That is not say that you shouldn't look at CPC and CTR. I'm just saying that one needs to weary because these metrics are biased and can lead to poor decision making.
9:28 am on Feb 9, 2019 (gmt 0)

Full Member

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Aug 3, 2015
posts:248
votes: 86


If I'm right I noticed that topic starter said that ads for mobile devices aren't showed correctly. If an ad doesn't show for >50% it doesn't count as showed. My mobile ads perform better than desktop but I've coded ads to show for desktop or mobile and I don't use responsive.
6:50 am on Feb 16, 2019 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 29, 2007
posts:1926
votes: 163


Focusing on only CPC is short sighted. RPM incorporates all bid-types.

I find that CPM ads pay me roughly 10% what CPC ads do per 1000 views but that's on my specific niche, all are different.
 

Join The Conversation

Moderators and Top Contributors

Hot Threads This Week

Featured Threads

Free SEO Tools

Hire Expert Members