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Recent Google Updates Impact AdSense Earnings

     
3:40 pm on May 12, 2012 (gmt 0)

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System: The following message was cut out of thread at: http://www.webmasterworld.com/google_adsense/4447973.htm [webmasterworld.com] by incredibill - 1:43 pm on May 12, 2012 (PST -8)


I really believe Google's recent updates to the SERPs have had an impact on AdSense. Statistics are now showing that Google is losing search traffic (down 5 percent from the same period last year), and that has to be having an impact on sites running AdSense.

I know Google has said that the revenue part of the company and the search part of the company don't influence each other, but as a public company, Google has an obligation to show a profit. How long before someone picks up the phone and tells search to fix whatever is going on, as they're losing market share?

The typical searcher doesn't care about a site's backlink profile, whether or not links are nofollow, or if that site posts on blogs deemed to be of poor quality. They just want the information they're seeking. It's annoying to find what you want one day, then return the next with the same search and find that page gone, or buried so deep it can't be easily found. That's a bad user experience. I'm all for getting rid of pages that don't offer any value, but it seems to me that recent updates have also removed pages that many would find helpful.

When they go to Bing or Yahoo and then find exactly what they were looking for, it certainly erodes any loyalty that person has had to Google in the past. I wonder if this partially explains the reduction so many have seen in AdSense performance. There's more to the Internet than big brand sites and sites with large advertising budgets. If Google is attempting to hold on to searchers longer within their own properties, it seems that idea isn't working out very well.
11:18 pm on May 12, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Very well said. In particular:

It's annoying to find what you want one day, then return the next with the same search and find that page gone, or buried so deep it can't be easily found.

I experienced that two days ago.

Compared to say six months ago, I'm finding it harder to unearth information on "how to fix something" where top listings seem to be forums, someone asking the same question which remains "unanswered".

Before I invariably used to get my question answered within the top five.
2:40 am on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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This happens to me quite often when I look up a guide on how to do something. I've seen really good guides on obscure sites vanish in favor of ehow garbage enough that it's become a pet peeve. It happened yesterday in fact when I was looking for a friends modification guide that had been top ranked for 4 years, I wanted to copy/paste the url for a customer but it was gone.

What's there now?
Step #1 - examine the product
Step #2 - review your examination
Step #3 - Shut up already, i'm backpaging, thanks anyway Mr Underpaid in India where this product is not available anyway.

Does it impact adsense earnings? of course. People like me will NEVER click on an ad from such a site and others will ALWAYS click on the ad because the barely relevant and vague instructions just didn't solve the problem and clicking the ad brings them somewhere else that *might* be more helpful. The problem? Ad clicks lead to sell pages. Free informational? not so much.

Google is determined to promote more well known brands now so expect their solution to hammer the obscure site in some way anyway. The obscure sites are often obscure because they're not build by Wall st backed companies or webmasters who do it for a living, they are build by enthusiasts who know what they are talking about.

edit: Google used to be awesome at unearthing and returning such obscure sites, not so anymore imo. I believe the current CEO Mr Schmidt even stated that he believes brands provide a measure of trust, but he ignores that they also bring a measure of not having a real clue.

[edited by: Sgt_Kickaxe at 2:53 am (utc) on May 13, 2012]

2:49 am on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Perhaps the more logical solution is this:
1. Build a better search engine for your area or vertical than Google.
2. Use an alternative analytics package.
3. Deepsix eHole and its clones.
4. Eliminate any site from the index that uses meatbot submission service.

Do whatever is possible to revert Adsense to a context based advertising system.

Regards...jmcc
2:55 am on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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That's not an option when a professional writes a guide and doesn't care about pleasing Google(some of the worlds BEST content fits that description). It's up to Google to get it right, and they're not as often anymore.

This is veering off topic so... the bottom line is that yes, recent updates have had an impact on adsense because they've impacted adwords.
2:57 am on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Yep but I don't have a very high opinion of the ability of the twiddlers in Google to actually get it right. The way these clowns promote scraped content and out of area results is just killing Google as a search engine and Adsense as a monetisation scheme.

Regards...jmcc
6:49 pm on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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I will never click on an eHow page again. Too bad eHow cannot tell us HOW they escape the MFA syndrome. Maybe they are owned by Googlers, or something like that.

I am about to start using Bing exclusively. For weeks now, I have searched Google first, and then Bing. The result? It is no longer necessary to search Google first. I now KNOW that the Bing results will always be better.

Focus on the bottom line is quickly making Google search irrelevant. I believe people are noticing, which bodes poorly for long-term AdSense success. The decline has already begun.

The solution for Google? I don't think there is one. Internally, AdSense will continue to trump Search due to profit pressure, thereby rendering Search less and less relevant, resulting in the eventual demise of the entire company.

The scary thing for us AdSensers will be crunch time - the time when it will be impossible for the ever-increasing profits to be posted. What measures will Google take to fight this eventuality? Reduced payout? Cancellation of AdSense entirely? (I understand it is a mere 5% of profit, whereas Google Search provides 95%, with none of the hassle of dealing with 1,000,000 publishers.) Should this occur, millions of iffy websites will vaporize overnight, INCLUDING eHow.
8:38 pm on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Adsense income is dependent on "free" organic traffic. Less traffic = less money. Many people complaining about lacking Adsense revenue might also need to mention that their traffic is down about the same percentage. I know there is more to it than that, but it's a majority I bet.

We can debate the search quality right now. The point is regardless which sites you do or do not find in the top 5, I bet they ALL run Adsense.

The Google SERPS are in a state of flux which has been like one earthquake followed by aftershocks, followed by another earthquake. Our ranking are bouncing lately and of course Asense earning will bounce accordingly.

I believe for myself that the best days are behind me. It's been nice, but for all the hard work for years and a slow steady increase, it's all but gone. To me that's a waste of time. So it's back to the drawing board. Smarter choice moving forward that's for sure. Google is not evil, but certainly greedy comes to mind. If your ranking is deemed less important to them, you can't expect Adsense to be close to stable.

It's more than just less traffic it also appears that your clicks and traffic will be scrutinized more. Not quite as easy to get the credit for those click. Take backs etc. I thought more competition would benefit me as a Adsense publisher but I was wrong. What I see is that the Adwords program needs to become better for the advertiser or Google will start to lose them. In order to do that, the bottom feeders, the publishers will take the financial hit. It's just reality. Twitter and Facebook don't have to pay the middle man from their ad profits. Google does pay us the publishers. In the long term, which structure would you put your money in?

I hope I was on topic although my comments were a bit general in nature.
9:31 pm on May 13, 2012 (gmt 0)

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Sgt_Kickaxe:
Google is determined to promote more well known brands now so expect their solution to hammer the obscure site in some way anyway. The obscure sites are often obscure because they're not build by Wall st backed companies or webmasters who do it for a living, they are build by enthusiasts who know what they are talking about.


This reality is almost equal to the decline of "specialist shop" in popular shopping streets in an average city. The've vanished and replaced by niddle-of-the-road brand / franchise shops. Shopping streets tend to look more and more the same.

Google's SERPS seem to move in the same direction - but the demand for specialist info is in no way gone. Same for the enthusiast who wrote stuff out of passion - producing great content. Okay the packaging hasn't always been great, but I agree on Google the're hard to find these days. Its replaced by shallow info delivered in SEO packaging.

And this brings about something interesting I've experienced with Adsense revenue. NOT providing the FULL answer, gets more clicks on related ads than a FULL answer, which is straight take-away and causes high bounce rates. Got my info! Thanks bye! Oh great site BTW!
 

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