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Adsense is going to change

     
1:01 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Straight from the adsense blog.

In the coming months, we'll be rolling out some new foundational features in AdWords for the content network. These features are intended to enhance your earning potential and the effectiveness of ads we serve to users on your sites. Some of the benefits of these features include:

Frequency capping, which prevents users from repeatedly seeing the same ads on your pages.

Improved attribution, to help advertisers identify the best performing sites in the network based on post-impression activity.

Improved ads quality, as we're able to improve ad performance within the Google content network.

You can read about these in more detail on our official Google blog. To enable these features, we'll be implementing a DoubleClick ad serving cookie on the content network. We now have a program policy that covers data usage related to the launch of these new features.

Source: [adsense.blogspot.com...]


How are they going to improve ads quality?
1:31 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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How are they going to improve ads quality?

I think that Google hopes that more and higher quality advertisers will begin to advertise within the content network and take advantage of these new features.

My experience with ad view capping when requested by my direct advertisers are that ad clicks are dramatically reduced. Virtually all of my direct advertisers will ask me to turn off frequency capping after a few weeks as they would rather have the visitors. Most of my direct advertisers are only interested in USA traffic and the way that I deal with this request is that I only show their ads during typical USA business hours.

I am encouraged that Google is trying to better manage and enhance the publishers (content) network, however AdSense does not seem have enough ads (much less quality ads) to supply my current demand. Frequency capping will probably cause really low quality ads to be presented to my regulars.

My gut feel is that I should utilize frequency capping with all of my contextual ads suppliers.

[edited by: Edge at 1:33 pm (utc) on Aug. 10, 2008]

2:26 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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This line caught my eye:

Improved attribution, to help advertisers identify the best performing sites in the network based on post-impression activity.

Is it possible that the next step might be for Google to allocate CPC ads based on site performance? (Or is the "improved attribution" intended mainly to be a tool for buyers of site-targeted CPM ads?)

3:27 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Frequency capping will probably cause really low quality ads to be presented to my regulars.

This is what I worry about too. Will the already seen ads be replaced by lower quality, lower paying ads or by comparable-paying ads that are just less well-targeted?

5:57 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Unless the ad-matching alogrithm changes, whether "already seen ads" are replaced by lower-quality, lower-paying ads or comparably-paying ads that are less well-targeted should be determined by what's in Google's ad inventory. In other words, the answer could vary from day to day, not just from site to site.

One thing to keep in mind: Frequency capping will also mean that other sites won't get as many impressions of this ad or that. That could benefit you, if some of those other sites (such as megasites) have been getting a disproportionate share of impressions for "red widgets" or "greet whatsits" or whatever your pages' keypharses might be.

6:28 pm on Aug 10, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Seems altogether positive to me if it will help attract advertisers back to the content network. Quality and return on investment for advertisers is the key to doing this (as well as all the other features mentioned in this thread). I think Google is actually starting to figure all this stuff out.

Domain parking is part of the search network right? If they keep it that way and improve content network tools (and exclude myspace and youtube, though aren't they in the search network too?) and if they keep on banning advertisers that don't perform then I reckon we are on to a winner.

No reason why we can't overtake the search network if advertisers have enough control to understand they might want to prefer us over the search network in some cases.

3:52 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Will the already seen ads be replaced by lower quality, lower paying ads or by comparable-paying ads that are just less well-targeted?

Why would they touch the quality-level of the ads? In other words: Which interst does Google have to show comparable-paying ads that are just less well targeted? None. High-paying ads that attract the wrong crowd do not make sense.

There seems to be a consensus that Google has not enough high-paying, well-targeted ads. Thus, they can distribute these ads differently across their publisher base. Frequency capping really means: "Show ads on MORE sites than before, and get more fresh eyeballs for ads."

Thus, I think Google will show the better targeted but low paying competing ads. Maybe that's behind this recent anti-MFA wave that we have been reading about? They need to further clean-up the system because they know that some sites may experience a drop in ad quality.

Then again, as all sites are facing the same issue, each site may also see "new" ads -ads that previously were determined to show on OTHER sites- as part of their ad mix.

All this will only become a problem if there are VERY few quality advertisers in a niche (facing MANY publishers) AND your site is doing well today (in terms of matching quality). Then the likelihood of "letting good ads go" overpowering "receiving good ads" is high. In such a scenario you can only lose. But thanks to Adsense's black box, you'll never know.

4:09 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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One thing all these things Google is doing, supposedly to attract more advertisers, but yet more and more advertisers seems to be leaving.

Maybe just maybe Google is over doing it. I mean I don't know the numbers but I do wonder, how happy are Advertisers now compare to when Google didn't have such complicated algos. That's a whole new Topic but anyways this new great idea by Google genius will affect a lot of publishers, specially smalls ones, because the few good quality ads will now be displace "now and then" by lower paying ads that pay less, and most likely will be click less. I do hope they make studies before they implement this thoroughly not only on big sites but smalls one. Although I doubt that they will pay attention to small publishers.

5:31 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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One thing all these things Google is doing, supposedly to attract more advertisers, but yet more and more advertisers seems to be leaving.

This year's second-quarter AdSense revenues were up 2% over the first quarter and 22% over the same quarter last year. If advertisers are fleeing, the evidence hasn't shown up yet in the financial reports.

Why be so negative about change? Anything that makes AdSense more attractive to advertisers should be good news for legitimate publishers over the long term.

6:11 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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One thing all these things Google is doing, supposedly to attract more advertisers, but yet more and more advertisers seems to be leaving.

So just how many advertisers have left? How many were there to start with? Do you really have any idea?

[edited by: Atomic at 6:12 am (utc) on Aug. 11, 2008]

6:32 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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When I think further about the consequences, I see bad news coming up: those who offer unique valuable content that creates a lot ad views from single visitors (who are prepared for purchase by the content) may probably suffer the most.

If you fail to "flip the burger" (make users click an ad) quick enough, ad quality (and EPC) will fall, and the likelihood of a click will be even further reduced because the MFA/low-quality guys get the eyeballs. Ouch. Just imagine someone starts reading a glossy magazine, and the ads get worse with each page turned. On the first few pages you see Porsche, BMW, Mercedes, then this turns to Volkswagon, Ford, Toyota, and at the end of the magazin you just see ads for Viagra, Get-rich-quick schemes, and useless business directories. *shudder*

In any case, I do expect my revenues to fall, unless I also benefit from "ads pushed over" from other sites.

9:03 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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For the record, the original announcement is here
[webmasterworld.com...]
9:29 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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>>For the record, the original announcement is here

Thanks for the reference to the other discussion, it'll be handy. There's bound to be a completely different impact for publishers and advertisers, and it'll be interesting to watch and see the two different perspectives.

But hold the phone. This is the FIRST thing publishers will have to look at and make sure to attend to. Linked to from the blog post, with reference to the DoubleClick cookies on publisher sites:

AdSense publishers must have and abide by a privacy policy that discloses that third parties may be placing and reading cookies on your users' browser, or using web beacons to collect information as a result of ad serving on your website. Learn more about preparing your privacy policy.

[google.com...]

Info on what has to be in the privacy policy:

[google.com...]

[edited by: Marcia at 9:50 am (utc) on Aug. 11, 2008]

11:24 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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That list unfortunately doesn't seem to include a single one of the items from the "AdSense feature request" threads.

"Improved ad quality" may come close, but we could improve ad quality a lot all on our own if G would give us the tools to do so.

11:49 am on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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If you observe an earnings drop, switch to counter offense and install scripts that serve ads from other networks to repeat visitors, you might even discover greener grass.
2:13 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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First of all I don't have time to search for articles that point out that Google is loosing advertisers. And when I mean loosing I mean advertisers they could have had and advertisers that are tire of it. It's a complicated calculations that some of you cant handle.

Second of all they are making profits for obvious reasons they taking money away from some publishers.

You know take it how it is, some of you guys will never see Google doing anything wrong so their is not point to pointing any negative about Google to you.

And hell yea I am afraid of changes because everytime they change I get even more screw. And Yes I have a site is is worth more then what I am getting, And no I can go to another type of advertising because there aren't good ones yet out. Other wise I be long gone. And to that end I don't depend on Google or any internet source for my major money maker. I learn that the hard way :)

Now I feel better. And I hope people does this one right or i wont have enough money to buy my Starbucks lol

2:44 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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security56 - I don't think it has anything to do with not being willing to say something negative about G, it's more like if you're going to make a statement about something, be prepared to back it up with data, otherwise it's just an opinion.
3:04 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Blaming your problems on Google may be cathartic, but it won't solve those problems. What can you do to improve the quality of the leads you're sending to Google's advertisers? You have control over your content and, by extension, over the nature and motivations of your audience. Google can match ads to the concepts on your pages, but it's your job to provide the right "eyeballs" for those ads.
3:13 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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i suspect frequency capping leads to a massive reduction in served unique ads per advertiser and therefore a strong increase in demand for serving alternative (read: lower paying) ads.

if so, it will only earn us more money, if the clickthrough rate rises accordingly. which is doubtable, when more low performing rubbish ads are shown instead.

3:21 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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otoh, in the best case it could lead to a) advertisers willing to spend more money on the content network because of better roi and b) more advertisers being attracted to test the increased performance. so let's see..
4:15 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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cathartic = a sudden emotional climax that evokes overwhelming feelings of great sorrow.

Man try to use smaller words

Well lets see, I try doing a google search on the articles I have read but the search is full of how to earn adsense money so that was a waste :) and I don't have time to search the whole web. page 100 perhaps.

Am I am not being cathartic because I am not like sorrow about it in fact I really don't care bout Google earnings, the only thing I am cathartic about is this forums are full of people that seem to see things one way. Might be me or might be you. And this forums provided me with almost two years of not having to work lol thanks to the seo. That was 1 Yr ago before google went bunkers. So I am real greatfull and come now and then to read the post and become very cathartic about the current situation. It's like instead of helping each other we use fancy words and use the blame game. Which is not helpfull at all. And I don't come to this forums to look smart I have no need for that.

The quality lead, well I realize that the type of people that go to my site are people that want something. Lets just say moving apples. Now in order to see the moving apples they need to pay the advertiser which is very specific to my site. Now being that I am on top of search engines in almost any keyword related to the moving apples, and people are willing to pay to see the moving apples. I say if this is not quality lead then I don't know what it is. So me needing to improve my site to send them quality leads is irrelevant to my situation.

Let me leave it at that and move to the topic.

This the cenario in my case anyways. I have a very unique site which competes with real big sites. Yet my site is on top of search ranking against them. I get real specific advertisers which are great. Now if this new capping thingy is like I think it is. I will have to share those specific ads with big sites and I will then get other less related ads taking the top priority just because of the capping and google by virtue will give the specific ad to the bigger sites because, well that's how google is.

What I am hoping that google does is create this capping for sites which have multiple topics. Leave those that have very specisific topics as is.

I mean if user comes to my site I want them to see this specific ad and if the user then goes 3 pages deeper then show them the other ads. I don't want for the user to come and see other ads beside the specific ad or if they go 1 page deeper see the other ads because they already seeing the specific ad.

Anyway you put it I don't see how this will help small publishers which very specific topics.

4:28 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Small publishers with very specific topics who want ads related to those very specific topics are probably better served to go find affiliates or other types of ads that will more directly attract their user base.

Google AdSense is 'set it and forget it' pretty much. You don't (can't) get laser precision targeted advertising from that, nor are you likely to get the very best value for your ad space (unless you have a pretty low site value to begin with) It's a trade off - you get an easy to implement ad system, saving you the time of having to chase down specific affiliate offers or advertisers, but in return, you don't get the control, the targeting, or the eCPM you could otherwise get if you had to do more work for it.

4:42 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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netmeg well I would love to work with affiliates but there aren't much that work for my specific topic. Actually CJ was working great and I was doing great until they pull out the specific advertiser which I was working with.

Unfortunately adsense is the only game in town for some of us. And we don't have much time "in my case" to look for other venues of earnings.

And like at say at this point I have don't really care about my Adsense earnings. I just miss being able to buy my Starbucks without using my other earnings :) and paying for my host ect.. I still keep the site up because there a lot of people seem to need it. I had to make the point for future references.

Any how since when good standing small publishers with specific topics weren't part of Google Adsense plan.? Did I miss something.

That's the way I see it this new capping will affect negatively small publisher with specific topics.

5:04 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

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I didn't say they weren't part of the plan. I said there are trade offs. You can do a lot of work up front and expect to earn more from it, or you can use the AdSense solution and realize you're maybe not making as much as you could otherwise - but it might give you time to have a life. What I think is unrealistic is expecting the best of both worlds. Maybe in the early days, but not now. The decisions are still in *your* hands - if your niche doesn't have decent affiliates or other ad options, then you have to think about whether or not you should be finding an additional niche that does.
2:20 am on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Re: [google.com...]

Clear as mud - the "click here" in their example text - is supposed to go where?

3:59 am on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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The question is one of trust -- how much do you trust Google to improve the content network to their own detriment. Ya, I'm cynical. We turned off the content network for all our clients when we realized how dismal the quality of the clicks were.

Unfortunately, I trusted that Google's Search Network was of a higher quality but found out the hard way that it's not. I just tracked down a referrer for several of our clients with tons of unique visits and bounce rates around 95%. It appears to be for parked domains and part of Google's Search Network.

It's unfortunate but we've had to turn off everything for our client sites except Google Search due to the really poor quality of the traffic. Will Google clean up their content network? Maybe but at least they give you tools to see what's going on an fix it. What about the pathetic quality of the search network though? I guess we just have to trust them? Hmmm, don't think so.

6:12 am on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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It appears to be for parked domains and part of Google's Search Network.

I think Google no longer considers parked domains as part of the search network, to the relief of many advertisers like you.

10:51 am on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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I posted the domains in question but they nuked my post. I'm 95% sure it's a parked domain -- ya know, one of those domains that uses a template with just ads on it.
1:25 pm on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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The theory of frequency capping sounds great, more variety so more clicks. If I can replace each 50c click with three at 20c then I'll be a happy bunny.

It all depends of course on having a large enough inventory of on-topic ads.

2:04 pm on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Re: [google.com...]
Clear as mud - the "click here" in their example text - is supposed to go where?

I think its supposed to go to the link they included in the paragraph above. That goes to a page that lets individuals opt out of targeted advertising. I included this link in my privacy policies.

This 67 message thread spans 3 pages: 67
 

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