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Only tech guys make money with adsense?

   
1:19 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Just a curious poll, do only tech guys make fortunes with adsense? Tech guys are being defined as guys who know how to create their own CMS, work their way around php, etc.

Are there are non-tech people here who are doing well in internet marketing?

1:22 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member quadrille is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



You don't need any tech knowledge to do well in adsense; granted, understanding the way it works helps - but their site enables any non-tech to learn (as do forums!).
1:54 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Are there are non-tech people here who are doing well in internet marketing?

Yes, I'm sure there are lots.

3:32 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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I cut and paste html, can't really write code and I make high 5 figures.
3:55 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



What about us tech chicks? Don't leave US out...
4:10 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I know what CMS is, but don't use one; never learned advanced HTML, such as cascading style sheets; can't program to save my life. And I do OK, for a part-timer.

IMO, content is more important than technical ability--I know of someone with several old niche sites who is making a decent living without even needing to update the sites....

4:11 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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Started out without a Technical background making very good money using FrontPage. The more I learn, The more I make.
4:27 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Learnt everything on my own : ASP, PHP mySQL blah blah blah. How much do I make? About 2% of TheTraveler.

Maybe it's time to cut and paste.

6:49 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)



How you create or serve your pages isn't as important as what's on them and who's reading them.
7:14 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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There is a lot of money in non-tech subjects.
8:04 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



I'm a total tech guy...

I serve my pages up from a nuclear powered supercomputer that runs in 6 dimensions and serves up pages before you ask for them.

However, it's the topic, not the technology, that makes money, unless by technology you mean SEO.

8:40 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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SEO?

You must mean GUESSEO.

10:06 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member quadrille is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Speak for yourself ;)
10:19 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Alot of those doing well with Adsense simply outsource the tech stuff. A basic understanding is always good but detailed knowledge of the workings of web design isn't always needed.
10:34 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Whats CMS? Do very well - totally self-taught. Wouldn't compare myself to a good web-site developer though. Make significant sums from adsense, and I know adwords inside-out.
10:38 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member sem4u is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



CMS? No
PHP? No
HTML? Yes
Make money with Adsense? Yes

You don't need to be that technical to make money from the web.

10:40 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Is it GUESSEO when you are number one for many results of about 500,000,000?

I am not very technical but my pages are interesting, accurate, look nice and make money :)

11:45 am on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I guess non-tech guys have a greater potential, as they often have better communication abilities and thus more unique content.
Integrating AdSense shouldn't be too problematic.
Additionally techies often only attract other techies who probably are much less likely to click ads.
12:02 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I think being a techie can hold you back with adsense.

Constant fiddling and little programming tricks can get you into trouble. And is often a waste of time that would better spent writing solid content.

I should know, I'm a techie who wasted the last 4 months trying to program my way around the QS issue

1:53 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Being a techie has its pros and cons. Maybe we don't have as good communication skills; maybe we care too much about elegant programming and forget the user experience. But I definitely think there are big advantages. A non-techie who isn't partnering with a techie is essentially putting up static pages, no? Building your own dynamic site takes technical know-how. If you know your way around a database and a server-side programming language, there is so much you can do beyond static pages.
2:20 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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"Is it GUESSEO when you are number one for many results of about 500,000,000?"
And here I was feeling happy about being number one of 200,000,000 results! Damn you ;)
2:39 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)



A non-techie who isn't partnering with a techie is essentially putting up static pages, no? Building your own dynamic site takes technical know-how. If you know your way around a database and a server-side programming language, there is so much you can do beyond static pages.

Sure, but dynamic sites can open whole new cans of worms, from database glitches that bring the whole site down to problems with search engines. For an editorial site that consists mostly of "evergreen" content, static pages are an excellent choice--and, just as important in the context of this discussion (and this forum), they can be very profitable for the publisher.

3:21 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

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trannack, CMS is content management system or content management software. If I were starting from scratch I might want to use one, if I could get it set up the way I wanted.
4:53 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Great content is the basis for the long standing success of any website. Visitors ultimately come to a site to obtain information.

Technical knowledge can definitely help you obtain that goal.

My experience has been that technical knowledge can also divert one from the ultimate goal of producing great content. It is easy to get diverted into other areas. It takes discipline to use technical knowledge in the most productive fashion.

In some cases - and if you can afford to - it may be better to contract out some technical matters and concentrate on content instead.

5:34 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)



My experience has been that technical knowledge can also divert one from the ultimate goal of producing great content.

I've seen "content guys" become absorbed in the intricacies of content-management systems to the point where their editorial output has languished. There's also a tendency for people to think they know more than they do (which is one reason why we see so many anguished posts on the Google Search News forum by Webmasters who've been hit with duplicate-content penalties, had problems getting pages crawled, etc.).

From an AdSense perspective (or for revenues, period), it's the content and audience that matter, not the process that was used to create and serve the content--unless, of course, your site is built around an online application (a la "user review" megasites or price-comparison engines).

5:49 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



The ideal is to have good communications skills all around -- technical and non-technical. Actually, a lot of publishing is "technical" even when it's not done on the Web. Audience targeting, content creation, graphic design, knowledgeable editing, etc., are just as important and -- in their own way -- as "technical" as which version of PHP you're using.

Ben Franklin was an expert printer but could also write like a demon. I suspect he was a good ad salesman too.

We use what in ham radio lingo would be called a "homebrew" CMS that produces flat HTML pages more or less dynamically. It was dreamed up by an English major and implemented by a high-level programmer. As ETF says, it doesn't matter how you get there -- it's targeted, literate, appealing content that attracts the right sets of eyeballs, which in turn can (the gods willing) produce the ad revenue.

5:56 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)



Actually, a lot of publishing is "technical" even when it's not done on the Web. Audience targeting, content creation, graphic design, knowledgeable editing, etc., are just as important and -- in their own way -- as "technical" as which version of PHP you're using.

Good point. I think a lot of people (both "content types" and "techies") fail to understand that publishing encompasses more than content and technology: The challenging part is figuring out how to acquire and "monetize" the right audience.

6:18 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member bigdave is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Your content is REQUIRED to make you money. Your technical skill is what enables you to make even more money. So do your interpersonal skills. So does your willingness to become a respected part of an online or offline community related to your topic. The ability to market your site is certainly worth a lot.

I'm not very good at a lot of those things, so I'm trying to get better.

You do have the ability to improve your skills in all those areas. If you want to make more money, it is worth your time to learn something new.

There are a lot of posts around this place complaining that you shouldn't have to do all this technical stuff to rank well in google. You should have to get links to rank if you have good content. Then their is the crew that thinks that you should have to have validating XHTML to rank well.

Could, should, would doesn't matter. What matters is that with very little effort, you can start learning some technical stuff. With very little effort, you can learn to be a better writer.

Don't despair because you aren't a "techie" Do what you are good at and then learn some new skills to add to that.

6:52 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)



There are a lot of posts around this place complaining that you shouldn't have to do all this technical stuff to rank well in google.

Actually, you don't have to. (What's "technical" about the Google Webmaster guidelines?)

7:13 pm on Nov 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member bigdave is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Actually, you don't have to.

You're right. But to some people, they want to just write the stuff, and have it instantly rank well because it is good content. If it is really good content, and can be found by at least some people, it will probably eventually rank, but taking some technical aspects into consideration will greatly speed up that process.

You have to admit that being willing to at least address a technical issue (canonical) mad a big difference for your income about a year ago. For some people, doing anything more than "Save as HTML" in Word is "too technical".

Worrying about internal site navigation - too technical.

Dealing with the page title, other than putting it in big letters at the top of your document - too technical.

[edited by: BigDave at 7:14 pm (utc) on Nov. 29, 2006]

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