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Theory on https

     
8:20 pm on Oct 12, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Strange...I am seeing many http sites above the https on allot of keywords in my own personal searches not related to my website. It crossed my mind that maybe by going https our sites are "re-evaluated" The question is: why force us to move to https? why would content only sites need to be https? Is there something else?

Does it just take your domain and "evalute" your site? Maybe moving the site into another Google algorithm specifically for https sites, that mixes with the https algorithm? mobile https, mobile http and so on. Afterall, there are many many Google algorithms but I am seeing http at the top of my personal searches most of the time. ohhh and the huffpost and other large media companies always in top 5.
1:41 am on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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why would content only sites need to be https?
Helpful links:

Why HTTPS Matters [developers.google.com]

Downsides of not using HTTPS [webmasterworld.com]
7:55 am on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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After all, there are many many Google algorithms but I am seeing http at the top of my personal searches most of the time.

HTTPS may be a ranking factor, but according to Google, it's a very small one.
8:23 am on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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With HTTPS you protect the:
- Privacy of your users (URLs visited, cookies exchanged, search queries and other form input);
- Integrity of your content (middlemen like ISPs can't alter your content);
- Transfer of your own data, such as passwords for logging into a CMS.

Basically: due diligence.

As a bonus, you get to tap into the performance benefits of HTTP/2, and possibly get a small boost in the SERPs.
11:46 am on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Every day there are more and more https websites that my samsung tablet won't let me access because the connection is not secure. Some of these are mega sites. I have tried changing settings on the tab to no avail. I wonder how much traffic gets lost because of this.
1:39 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Every day there are more and more https websites that my samsung tablet won't let me access because the connection is not secure.

I thought that https sites are supposed to be more secure.
5:37 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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If the tablet is more than a few years old, the problem is likely the OS on the tablet not the website. Get newer hardware and you won't have that problem.

Just a FYI - it's been discussed many times that very old browsers and OSs do not support some elements used with HTTPS.
8:36 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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That's more of a client issue. Basically, if your device's default browser is so old that it can't handle HTTPs, get a better one from the app store. Hard to imagine a Samsung tablet being old enough not to accept HTTPs, though. Unless it's running Android 2.x. What's the model?
9:08 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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One reason I finally had to abandon Camino, although I loved it dearly, was that it couldn't keep up with security certificates. It habitually said that suchandsuch site had an invalid, unknown or untrusted certificate--meaning, I assume, only that the browser's internal list was no longer getting updated--so I got in the bad habit of ignoring and overriding warnings about security.
9:47 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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My traffic dropped after I switched to HTTPs.
11:22 pm on Oct 13, 2017 (gmt 0)

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@virtualrealityvirtualreality

if your traffic dropped significantly, you must be missing something somewhere in your implementation of the https protocol.

I was super scared to switch. I did my homework and covered every angle. When I fixed every single issue, I was less scared. I never saw a drop on any of the sites I converted. I actually saw a bump up.
4:25 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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"If the tablet is more than a few years old, the problem is likely the OS on the tablet not the website. Get newer hardware and you won't have that problem."

i did not post this asking for help. I am bringing it up because there are a lot of old devices out there that might have the same problem. I don't expect the public to update their devices to accommodate my sites.

What will cause the loss of the most traffic, a warning in a drop down menu on chrome or old devices?
4:27 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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OS is android 4.4.2
4:42 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I sell to a tech-savvy audience, so old kit it not an issue.

But sure, it is well worth looking at your User Agent profile to check there will not be significant loss.

Android 4.4.2 supports SNI, so not sure what's causing the issue there.
4:51 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Also, Google isn't forcing you to do anything. It's just good practice as a user to be on HTTPS, and the Chrome warning is aimed at users.

HTTPS means that no one can see what page I'm on- only the domain. I am protected from MiTM attacks, including content tampering. Any URL parameters from on-site searches are hidden.

I hate using HTTP sites, and will strongly prefer HTTPS sites.

I am not typical, admittedly.
6:59 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I hate using HTTP sites

Then you hate using the majority of sites on the web.
7:58 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Awright, aristotle, come clean. What's your real objection to HTTPS? Was your mother frightened by an SSL before you were born?

I'm currently at two HTTPS and two HTTP, but that's just because I haven't the energy to keep track of four sites' redirects all at once, so I'm doing them by dribs and drabs.
8:11 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I'm currently at two HTTPS
To date, I've switched 32 sites (3 of my own.) I've got the process down to about 30 - 40 minutes in most cases.
9:00 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I hate using HTTP sites

I'm not quite there yet, but have definitely noticed an increased "yuck" response to seeing HTTP sites.
9:23 pm on Oct 19, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Awright, aristotle, come clean. What's your real objection to HTTPS?

Well my main objection is the $50 per year fee that my hosting company wants. For my six sites, that adds up to $300 per year. Yes I know that there are cheaper options, even free, but when I looked at them, I didn't like what I saw.

So that's why I'm waiting -- to see if better options become available.
12:05 am on Oct 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I've got the process down to about 30 - 40 minutes in most cases.

Oh, the HTTPS change as such is about 5 minutes. Change htaccess globally, click a few buttons in host's control panel, optionally contact a couple of people to ask if they can change their existing links (only the ones I'm in regular communication with, obviously). It only takes time because I'm obsessive about keeping track of redirects ... into perpetuity.
1:43 am on Oct 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Much depends on one's host unless one is running dedicated servers but I believe it best practice to be able to fail over to HTTP from HTTPS as necessary. Some older devices, OS's, and some needs requirements simply don't need/handle HTTPS well or at all.

Of course a lot depends on your audience and their device capabilities. Yet another 'know your audience' moment.
3:40 am on Oct 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Oh, the HTTPS change as such is about 5 minutes. Change htaccess globally, click a few buttons in host's control panel
Ha... I'm not referring to just clicking a button. Some sites require editing scripts & CSS, editing framework files, 3rd party apps, internal site search, rebuilding back-end functions, manually checking hundreds of pages for errors... stuff like that.

I automate as much as I can, but some things require a more personal approach. Some hosts make it relatively fast & painless, others not so much.
4:21 am on Oct 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Some sites require editing scripts & CSS, editing framework files, 3rd party apps, internal site search, rebuilding back-end functions, manually checking hundreds of pages for errors... stuff like that.

Mercifully I've never used absolute links internally, so that's one less thing to think about. It's more about miscellany: for example when I went HTTPS on my personal site I had to check for any and all links from other sites. They're always in the strangest places. (How the heck am I supposed to remember that example.com/dir1/page1 has a link to example.org/dir2/subdir3/page4, of all things?) Luckily there exist text editors with multi-file search, and if I'm feeling very brave I'll even let it do an unsupervised global replace. No databases--wouldn't touch them with a barge pole--except analytics, which lives on my personal site. Which in turn is why I changed that one first, even though nobody ever goes there in person.

No, the long-term time-consuming thing for me is monitoring redirects. This can actually be very informative: why is the search engine so much more interested in page A than in page B, when there's no visible difference in visitor count or change frequency? Hmmm. And will they ever stop asking for http://example.com several times a day? It's entrapment again, isn't it. Astoundingly, bing asks less often than Google. It seems like just the kind of thing bing would keep grinding away at forever, like asking for pages that were removed in 2011.
5:52 am on Oct 20, 2017 (gmt 0)

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When working on one's own site there are certain luxuries not afforded with that of the client.
 

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