Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 3.209.80.87

Forum Moderators: Robert Charlton & goodroi

Message Too Old, No Replies

How to recover after the server was not available (I had a Ddos attack)

     
7:45 am on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from DE 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 20, 2003
posts:890
votes: 6


I had a massive Ddos attack - up to 500 millions hits per day!

The server was not available for about 3-4 days. I'm trying to recover.

Any advice what to do? Or just wait?
1:27 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 30, 2005
posts:13012
votes: 222


How much damage did you incur in your ranking/indexing?

I'd just wait.
1:54 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from DE 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 20, 2003
posts:890
votes: 6


I have tenthousends of keywords - too much too control by hand. I'll get an overview only once per week at sunday when I see my overall visibility. Than I'll see the damage in ranking.

Also in the moment I'm still under attack. Therefore, I'm still busy with blocking and keep the service alive.

I also had to change my IP, but I hope that this doesn't play a role.
1:59 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 27, 2003
posts:1600
votes: 0


My advice is to be careful with the next steps.

We had a similar experience with a series of ddos attacks. We were ok with that even when the site went down.

What hurt us with Google was the increase in authorization errors we got after putting password protection in our login pages [webmasterworld.com...] sometime in June. Google traffic went downhill after that. Even after we have removed password protection, traffic just went sliding down, down and down with Dec our lowest point.

We are now up more than 100% from our lowest point last year, but still a lot way off from our traffic before the attacks.

So just be careful on what you implement next to protect your site. To this day, I still can't understand why Google would react that way to putting password protection to our login pages, but they did -- and we got severely hit in the process.
5:02 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from DE 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 20, 2003
posts:890
votes: 6


Thanks for the advice.

Anyway in my case all traffic is just for the homepage, no other page. Therefore, there is nothing to protect or any other way to avoid traffic apart from blocking IPs and blocking countries. So far I've blocked about 20 coutries plus thousands of IPs. It's hard to get rid of that attack even with professional help.
5:48 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member aristotle is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Aug 4, 2008
posts:3661
votes: 373


doc_z
I suggest that you start a thread about this in the WebmasterWorld Search Engine Spider and User Agent Identification Forum
[webmasterworld.com ]
There are some real experts there who might be able to help you improve your defenses against this.
10:01 pm on Dec 9, 2014 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lucy24 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 9, 2011
posts:15884
votes: 876


thousands of IPs

You're cutting your slivers too small.