Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.159.246.164

Forum Moderators: goodroi

Message Too Old, No Replies

EU launches antitrust probe into alleged Google abuses

   
11:20 am on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)



EU launches antitrust probe into alleged Google abuses (BBC News)

E.U. Opens Investigation Into Google Over Alleged Abuse Of Dominant Position [bbc.co.uk]
The European Commission has launched an investigation into Google after other search engines complained that the firm had abused its dominant position.

The body said it would look into whether the world's largest search engine lowered the ranking of competing services in its results.

The probe follows complaints by British price comparison site Foundem and French legal search engine ejustice.fr.


"The European Commission has decided to open an antitrust investigation into allegations that Google has abused a dominant position in online search," the body said in a statement.

It said the action followed "complaints by search service providers about unfavourable treatment of their services in Google's unpaid and sponsored search results coupled with an alleged preferential placement of Google's own services."

[edited by: engine at 12:43 pm (utc) on Nov 30, 2010]
[edit reason] added link and quotes [/edit]

12:15 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tangor is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month




System: The following message was spliced on to this thread from: http://www.webmasterworld.com/goog/4236737.htm [webmasterworld.com] by engine - 12:44 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (utc 0)


The European Commission has decided to open an antitrust investigation into allegations that Google Inc. has abused a dominant position in online search, in violation of European Union rules (Article 102 TFEU). The opening of formal proceedings follows complaints by search service providers about unfavourable treatment of their services in Google's unpaid and sponsored search results coupled with an alleged preferential placement of Google's own services. This initiation of proceedings does not imply that the Commission has proof of any infringements. It only signifies that the Commission will conduct an in-depth investigation of the case as a matter of priority.

Google's internet search engine provides for two types of results when people are searching for information. These are unpaid search results, which are sometimes also referred to as "natural", "organic" or "algorithmic" search results, and third party advertisements shown at the top and at the right hand side of Google's search results page (so-called paid search results or sponsored links).


[europa.eu...]
1:08 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



This will be interesting.

I suspect the "manipulates results" charge will be a non-starter, because Google can point to lots of price comparison sites which do well.

However:

The Commission's probe will additionally focus on allegations that Google imposes exclusivity obligations on advertising partners, preventing them from placing certain types of competing ads on their web sites, as well as on computer and software vendors, with the aim of shutting out competing search tools. Finally, it will investigate suspected restrictions on the portability of online advertising campaign data to competing online advertising platforms.


(from the europa.eu link above)

Google may well lose this part.
3:16 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



because Google can point to lots of price comparison sites which do well.


... Whom probably receive most of their referrals from Google.
5:07 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I just wonder if at some point the E.U. has more important things to focus on then going after Google every month.
Maybe they should focus on rebuilding Ireland instead of a $110 Billion bailout.
Do they pick the easy targets on purpose?
5:22 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



whine whine whine
5:38 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member kaled is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



1) Ireland's problem resulted from their economy being built like a house of cards - insufficient foundations.
2) It's certainly not the EU's job to rebuild the economy of any country.
3) The EU doesn't make a habit of going after Google, however, Google did screw up big time with respect to wi-fi data collection. That didn't attract the attention of the EU, it was individual countries whose laws were broken.


It will be interesting to see how this pans out. I have thought for many years that Google and other search engines will eventually have to open up at least part of their technology for auditing to ensure a level playing field. This action by the EU might lead to the first step down that path.

Kaled.
5:56 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



It's certainly not the EU's job to rebuild the economy of any country.


And yet they are bailing them out, LOL. These days its almost more profitable to take an unnecessary risk and loose then to actually do something right.

I am sorry if I have derailed the conversation, but it my opinion bigger things are overlooked for the easier targets.

Sure Google needs to be held accountable and/or over-seen, but at what cost? And as a "tax payer" are you willing to foot the bill?
8:23 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



My "in house" numbers show greater dominance among multiple sites than what is reported by comscore. I'm happy to get the traffic, but I get the feeling the dominance is greater than it appears.
9:03 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)



I like the bit about "alleged" preferential placement of its own services.

Theres nothing alleged about it - they plaster their own shiz all over millions of search terms.

Its their engine though. I cant ever escape that thought - I just wish they werent stuffing their crap all over the serps.
1:07 am on Dec 1, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Do they pick the easy targets on purpose?


They pick the rich targets.
1:26 pm on Dec 1, 2010 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member sgt_kickaxe is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



Borrow, borrow, borrow.
Spend, spend, spend.
Ask for a handout, err, bailout to borrow and spend some more.

Is it me or has government(s) gone bonkers in thinking they can climb out of debt by creating more?

Anyway, Google isn't going to give away any trade secrets without a counter trade secrets suit and so they can't fully be investigated anyway. I don't suspect we'll see any concrete change from this.
12:44 pm on Nov 30, 2010 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member




System: The following message was spliced on to this thread from: http://www.webmasterworld.com/goog/4236790.htm [webmasterworld.com] by goodroi - 3:01 pm on Dec 3, 2010 (utc -5)


The European Commission has launched an investigation into Google after other search engines complained that the firm had abused its dominant position.

"Google is exploiting its dominance of search in ways that stifle innovation, suppress competition, and erode consumer choice," Foundem said in its complaint filed in February 2010.

[bbc.co.uk...]