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How High is your Clickthrough Rate (CTR)?

Design can make big differences

   
7:15 am on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



General info...
We started Adsense in Dec 2004

Placed ads on some pages way below the fold
lower right corner skyscraper style

We had 0.6% CTR

Made some money... ;-)

Moved the Ads to Top Right Skycraper Position
We went to 4% CTR made more money ;-)

Moved to Above the Fold on Left but not at top
We went to 6% CTR made more money ;-O

Designed pages to wrap our text all around the
Adsense Ads to that there is text above to the left to the right and below the rectangle ads ... now
CTR is averaging about 11.1% ... Yippe

I think this proved to me that publishers
can choose to have 0.6% CTR or make about 23 times that much money, if they want to design the site around the Adsense ads instead of just finding a place to squeeze them on your existing site.

I am concerned that 11% is probably a really high CTR
and possibly might trip some warning at Google
to check out the publisher closely by hand, so that they can determine that there is no fraud going on, which there is not, I just totally redesigned the site, with adsense revenue in mind.

For my peace of mind, do many have as high or higher CTR rates?

Thank you for your responses

Good Luck Everyone

7:33 am on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



First, you might want to consider removing the numbers from your post, as giving ctr is a tos violation.

I changed the placement, color, and background on my ads and immediately tripled my ctr to well above your highest posted ctr. Google never made an issue of this with me (changes were made 2 months ago).

I wish you continued success and suggest you try playing with the color schemes as well if you haven't already.

Cary

7:39 am on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I'm just curious what might be the best location for the wide towers.
7:52 am on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jenstar is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Thanks for the post, Get_em. It definitely is proof how a .6% CTR can effectively jump to a 11% CTR simply by tweaking placement and design.

If you are holding steady at a 11% CTR, I wouldn't worry at all. There are factors regarding the design that they can see was cause of the CTR increase. If your CTR spiked dramatically one day for no apparent reason, that is something that could warrant checking into.

11% is a good CTR. I see .5 to 1.5 CTR often as a starting off CTR rate before new publishers begin tweaking colors/placement/design to make it higher. And it only goes up from there ;)

8:51 am on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member




The numbers are just percentages ....

I didn't give # of impressions, dollars,
or any really significant numbers,
how can they know whose stats they are from
there.. Heck I could be making this up ;-)

To the editors ...
I can remove the numbers, if someone can tell me how... I can edit my post ... can I edit my post?

Or if the editors see fit they can x them out or whatever. Sorry yo all if I scared anyone.

1:03 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Call me controversial, but I don't want 11% CTR. >;->
It's more valuable to me if as many as 11% of my visitors do not find AdSense adverts more interesting than my content.

Last summer, I added more significant content to a number of my pages and immediately saw the AdSense CTR fall - I assume the two weren't entirely unrelated.

At first I was a little miffed by this, but then, thinking about it I realised that in the long term it would probably translate into more repeat visitors. As far as I can tell, it did.

Now, if I could increase the CTR and the repeat visit rate at the same time... >;->

1:54 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



CTR stats really depend on the volume of page views and the industry you are in. If your page views are small the ctr can jump all over the map due to statistical variation.
4:21 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



If your page views are small the ctr can jump all over the map due to statistical variation.

Makes perfect sense ...

I would say for any kind of real accuracy
you would have to have a least 1000 impressions
to know an honest CTR.

6:14 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ken_b is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Another thing to think about regarding CTR is how sticky your site is. If your site has a high page view per visitor number. Your click CTR is likely to be lower.

If you have a site where page views per visitor is low, you might get a much higher CTR.

At least that's my understanding.

7:19 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Wow, impressive numbers.
Designed pages to wrap our text all around the
Adsense Ads to that there is text above to the left to the right and below the rectangle ads ... now
CTR is averaging about 11.1% ... Yippe

Which one exactly? The wide ad? 4 across? 5 across? Wish I could see a screenshot of how you designed that page. It's against the TOS here, but maybe if you can post a screenshot without any url or identifying elements to the page?

I think a dirty little secret about being insanely successful with google ads (that I've seen other sites do) is to trick the user into clicking the ad. Leaving no space above, below, right and left of the ad. CTR should shoot up. But it isn't exactly right for your visitors. And if it gets too widespread I would bet Google will change their TOS (or force bigger space around their ad).

I couldn't see leaving no spaces around the ad personally. But surrounding it with text in a clean way sounds nice.

I'm not much of a CSS guru. Is that how you did it?

11:26 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member annej is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



text above to the left to the right and below the rectangle ads

Get-Em, Are you matching your adsense border and background to your page background? In other words can people clearly see that you have an ad there? I'm just wondering if the biggest factor is the article text being wrapped around the ad or the fact that the ad blends in with the article background.

added> Clark, someone else here gave me this easy CSS way to float a rectangle ad.

<div style="float: right; margin: 0 0 3px 3px;">
then the rectangle ad code then end it with
</div>

If you put it part way down the page it will have text above, below and to the left. Just change right to left if you want the ad on the left. Adjust the margins as needed.

I haven't tried floating with text all around. <added

11:59 pm on Mar 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



CTR itself, no matter 0.5% or 10%, does not mean too much. If you only get 2 impressions today and one click, then your CTR is 50%.

50% itself is too high to believe. But if it is 1/2, than it is not surprsing at all.

4:12 am on Mar 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Started in December 2004 eh?
5:48 am on Mar 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Yeah, I was about to say... what's today's date? Is it March 2005? Oh man... looks like I stepped through another invisible wormhole...
6:09 am on Mar 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Yeah, I was about to say... what's today's date? Is it March 2005? Oh man... looks like I stepped through another invisible wormhole...

I meant Dec 2003 ...
and to who asked I do not crowd the ads ...

I just make them in the center of the page
instead of on an edge (top, bottom, left or right)

I also add clearly over the ads
the wording Sponsored Links as a heading

I don't have to (I think) but I want the viewers to know and I figure Google may appreciate it.

7:04 am on Mar 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member




CTR itself, no matter 0.5% or 10%, does not mean too much. If you only get 2 impressions today and one click, then your CTR is 50%.
50% itself is too high to believe. But if it is 1/2, than it is not surprsing at all.

I ever saw my CTR 200%.

This happend one day when the first click apeared in the stats:
impressions: 1, clicks:2

11:32 am on Mar 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



As others keep saying, placing much weight on what someone ELSE gets as a CTR is a mistake. There are so many variables:

How many impressions do you have per day?

Are you in a popular subject matter, or is it niche?

Is your site sales-oriented or information-oriented?

Does your audience look at many pages or only a few per visit?

Do you have many daily repeat viewers, or are most one-time?

Are visitors to your site looking to [eventually] purchase something that might be advertised?

Is your content really good or are people LOOKING to leave?

So what's a good CTR? Whatever your site can generate! How can you improve it without otherwise changing or improving the site? By experimenting with colors, sizes and placements. What will work depends on your layout, content and audience.