Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.226.194.180

Forum Moderators: incrediBILL & martinibuster

Message Too Old, No Replies

Are the good advertisers jumping ship?

     

ann

2:36 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ann is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Another evening spent running down bad ads, what a waste when I had intended to work on my pages. :(

I am beginning to be convinced that all the good advertisers are jumping ship and leaving Google in droves rather than putting up with the waste of their money.

I don't beleive they are simply opting out of the content network as I have also seen MFA's in the serp ads beating out good companies for placement.

I actually killed off a ringtone ad! Has nothing to do with my sector....grrrr..

End of rant

An

helleborine

2:50 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I fear the whole system will collapse.

It is with great horror that I noticed today that MFA's comprise 60% of the ads displayed, despite my efforts at blocking them.

I don't know if the good advertisers are jumping ship, but the bad have outnumbered the good.

My sector is crafts - nothing fishy or cut-throat.

Play_Bach

3:06 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member play_bach is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



My earnings are down $300 a month from where they were in February. Not a huge sum compared to what others here are making, but enough of a drop for me to pay attention! :-(

helleborine

3:17 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



My own earnings are on a steady downward slope that is only held back by my valiant efforts to put out more pages. The drop could be seasonal, though.

But my thinking is that if people keep clicking on Ads leading to these crappy, useless MFAs with phony search results surrounded by ads of all kinds, they're going to stop clicking.

My site now has up to 60% MFAs. It is a disaster in the making.

I cannot spend all my time excluding them manually.

There will come a time when Google will regret being so greedy in the short term that and sabotaging the long term.

celgins

3:18 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



I believe three things are happening:

1) Regular advertisers who have a healthy budget and wish to continue advertising, have switched almost exclusively to the Search network;

2) Other regular advertisers have simply stopped advertising as much as they used to;

3) Some advertisers have opted (as ann stated) to jump ship, seeking better ways to spend their advertising dollar, yen, kronor, schilling, pound, etc.

GoldenHammer

3:20 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Once I have wondered if Google would send more MFA or lowest paid ads to some specific AS sites they consider in a lower conversion (or whatever Google lower rank AS site). That seems not the case as I verified AS keeps rotation of similar MFA, shown on a top ranked site in my sector.

In this connection, all AS sites are suffering the MFA ads spam.

ann

3:23 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ann is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



If you notice the serps ads you will see that the crap is beating out the good and no advertiser is going to stick around for for wasting ad money on that.

I wish Google would get a handle on this as I like them and believe they are a good company but I fear that love of the almighty dollar is blinding them as they head for disaster.

Ann

chikung

3:25 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I need to know..how you figured out MFS's

celgins

3:31 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Has anyone ever noticed that ASA never comments on these type posts? (When these are exactly the posts we wish him/her to comment on the most!)

Not a direct knock on ASA, as I'm sure he/she abides by whatever rules Google has in place... (in reference to mentioning particulars about the Adsense and Adwords programs)

Ideally we would like to hear something to the effect: "Yes, we're actively working to clean up MFA's", or "Google realizes this is an issue and has noted good points from WW members. We are working to correct the MFA problem and hope to have it neutralized very soon."

Unfortunately, I don't think we'll hear such statements.

helleborine

3:43 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I think Google's calculations to keep MFAs on board are like grabbing today's dime instead of tomorrow's dollar.

GoldenHammer

3:46 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



[.... I think Google's calculations to keep MFAs on board are like grabbing today's dime instead of tomorrow's dollar....]

MFA makes Google earns less now and tomorrow too.

I don't believe MFA is a technical issue, but Google's management decision/ control resistance to change, and that is the sign running to vanish or being taking over by other emerging approaches.

[edited by: GoldenHammer at 4:03 am (utc) on June 21, 2006]

eeek

3:48 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I still see good ads on many topic. The problem is that the bad ads often take over (especially on virgin pages). All too often adsense is targeting off of strings in the URL that have little (or no) relation to the subject of the page. One site of mine has "core" in the URL and Google gives me some very weird ads based on that instead of the real topic. Unfortunately there's no way to tell Google to ignore strings in the URLs.

ken_b

3:49 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ken_b is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Are the good advertisers jumping ship?

I don't know how you're defining "good", but if you mean those who run ads that attract clicks...............

........no, not in my experience.

Things are looking good from my perspective. I spent the evening working on my pages.

GoldenHammer

4:09 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



[....I don't know how you're defining "good", but if you mean those who run ads that attract clicks............... ]

A simple definition for "good" ad. - your user find it useful... :P

humblebeginnings

5:12 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



I am sorry to hear that some of you are not doing very well at the moment (Adsense-wise).
I also see many so-called MFA ads on my pages, but it doesn't seem to affect my earnings very much. Even pages that have about 100% MFA ads are paying me well. I think it is a myth that that kind of advertisers is going for the cheapest clicks. I guess they too want to be in one of the top spots or else their advertising effort is useless. And if you want the top spots you will need to pay dearly for your clicks...

If there indeed is a general falling of earnings (wich I doubt) I think it could be caused by the growth of the number of publishers. The number of advertisers needs to catch up to fill the gap!

ann

5:17 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ann is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Ken,

I too was feeling the way you are and each month showed a good increase until in November it suddenly went kaput...overnight, yes, literaly overnight my clicks were cut in half but the traffic was the same or a little better and the PPC was still good.

Now the pay out on those clicks are also going from 4 cents to 9 cents each, fluctuating all during the day...

I thought at first that Google was blocking something or other but now...I don't know what to think.

Just keep hoping I guess.

<edit by me> Oh yeah another big factor is the same ads never changing for a year or more along with a good rate of return visitors.

People are tired of them and may have ceased to click especially when the other choices are MFA's.

there are millions of sites in my sector, there should be no shortage of advertisers.

idolw

5:41 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



hey, what about site targetting?
i have seen in my adwords account that i can target some sites and put ads on them. why not try to build such sites that advertisers will bid on?

turtlehurricane

5:43 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I am very glad to be out of google. Im worry free now with my new advertiser. Now i can focus on my website.

GoldenHammer

6:09 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



[...I am very glad to be out of google. Im worry free now with my new advertiser. Now i can focus on my website....]

While AS still shares the major partion of my income, its delining trend let me turn to believe that AS would be completely out from my websites sometimes later, not very soon though ... :P

NoLimits

6:49 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I unloaded most of my AdSense appropriate sites last year, as they were (and still are) selling for several times the monthly intake. I could not find peace in my mind with the thought lingering that my liveliness rests in the hands of one company, Google. I have diversified into sites that can be monetized in a wider range of ways.

My monthly income has dropped substantially as a result of starting over with several new sites; but I feel that the internet is changing rapidly and stand by my decision. I don't think AdSense will tank, in fact - I intend to continue using them in part. I do however believe that the value of the click is going to get a reality check. It's just extremely important, and I can't stress enough - advertiser diversification. Anyone who has spent any amount of time on this forum has read it a thousand times, "DIVERSIFY!". This has got to be one of the most volitile industries on earth. Rags to riches - riches to rags, find a happy medium through diversification. The sooner - the better.

mzanzig

7:32 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I can not confirm for my sites that good advertisers are leaving Google. I see a lot of quality advertisers who are actually providing useful information to my visitors.

However, I can confirm that the MFA problem is getting worse by the day. Whenever I look deeper into my pages, I can easily spot the MFAs in the preview tool. And very often these are the known suspects, i.e. companies and individuals who are running and advertising dozens, if not hundreds, of useless sites.

As said many times before, I feel that we as publishers have simply too few tools to really manage our ad real estate effectively!

The most effective instant help would be
1) bigger filter lists
2) filter all ads associated with an Adwords account

This is not rocket science. It's a matter of will, not a technology problem.

annej

8:07 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member annej is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



If I understand right, advertisers can now bid on content ads seperately from the ads that show up on Google search. Also I think the lowest bid is lower for content sites. So this may also be part of the problem.

Play_Bach

11:29 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member play_bach is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



> The most effective instant help would be

Being able to set the minimum bid allowed on your sites. "Money talks, bs walks!"

Eazygoin

11:41 am on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



The most effective instant help would be

Being able to set the minimum bid allowed on your sites.

Would this not create a high percentage of public service ads being displayed, due to the fact that there wouldn't be enough higher priced ads to go around?

Play_Bach

12:24 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member play_bach is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



> Would this not create a high percentage of public service ads being displayed, due to the fact that there wouldn't be enough higher priced ads to go around?

I think that would depend on the sector and how high the publisher was setting the minimum. It's pretty clear to me that if email spammers for example had to pay even 1 cent for every spam they sent out, there would be a lot less of them. Same idea here regarding MFAs - price them out.

deepesh

1:03 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I guessed I was only experiencing downtrend, I hope Google will look into it.

toomer

1:43 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



set the minimum bid allowed on your sites

This was discussed rather extensively in this thread -

[webmasterworld.com...]

- and it was the general conclusion that this approach ... while it would seem helpful at first glance ... would actually make the MFA problem worse overnight.

I used to want this capability. Now I don't.

Play_Bach

1:55 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member play_bach is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



> This was discussed rather extensively in this thread -

I read that thread, thanks - but I don't buy the conclusion. It's specious at best. Money works well at segregating junk from quality - set the price high enough and the junk will disappear.

celgins

1:59 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Set the price high enough and the junk will disappear.

Kind of like going into an inner city area accustomed to low-income housing and building $1.8M (US) priced condominiums.

Either you can afford it, or you find somewhere else to live.

Play_Bach

2:09 pm on Jun 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member play_bach is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



> Either you can afford it, or you find somewhere else to live.

Exactly. If advertisers had to pay $2 a click to have their ads show on my sites vs. a few cents, I doubt I'd see ringtone or bogus survey ads - ever.

This 99 message thread spans 4 pages: 99
 

Featured Threads

Hot Threads This Week

Hot Threads This Month