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Accuracy of ads to content

     
9:55 pm on Oct 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

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How accurate do the ads have to be when sending visitors to your site?

e.g. if you say, "Come get widget X for a free download" yet on your site there is no download, just some adverts of widget x, how is that viewed by Google? Is it allowable?

Jon

11:06 pm on Oct 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

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Depends on the editor. I have had a "free" keyword disabled when the free bit was a time-limited free trial, but in another ad group, the same term (different match) was allowed or missed.
12:01 am on Oct 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

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How accurate do the ads have to be when sending visitors to your site?
e.g. if you say, "Come get widget X for a free download" yet on your site there is no download, just some adverts of widget x, how is that viewed by Google? Is it allowable?

Just a few paragraphs on the principle involved here.

At the bottom line, everything in an ad needs to be true, and it needs to be reflected on the site that our user is taken to.

Why? Well, since there are millions and millions of folks searching on Google every day, wouldn't it be excellent to have them instinctively trust your ads when the appear, over time, and continue to click on them?

Earning the trust of our users* - by delivering meaningful, accurate, and useful advertising - is the underlying principle behind the review process.

I think that if advertisers adhere to this principle, they'll have no trouble with the review process. Well, except maybe for spelling. ;)

* And need I say that our users are your customers?

AWA

12:07 am on Oct 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

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Obviously AdwordsAdvisor stated the official policy, but wouldn't it also be nice if we online business people actually started acting like ethical grownups and didn't rely on the kinds of sleazy practices that rightly get bricks-and-mortar businessmen sued, put in jail, or otherwise shunned by honest society?
10:53 am on Oct 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

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What about when using dynamic keywords e.g. {KeyWord}?

You may get someone going to a page that does not contain what the title says.

e.g. someone types in "health soup diet" and your ad therefore says that. They go to your site but it says nothing about a soup diet. But you are targetting the keyword "health" on broadmatch.

It is clearly not relevant but I don't see how you can get around this.

What happens at review time? Do Google close your account or do they simply remove your ads?

6:09 pm on Oct 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

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What about when using dynamic keywords e.g. {KeyWord}?
You may get someone going to a page that does not contain what the title says.

e.g. someone types in "health soup diet" and your ad therefore says that. They go to your site but it says nothing about a soup diet. But you are targetting the keyword "health" on broadmatch.

It is clearly not relevant but I don't see how you can get around this.

Jon12345, the trick is to not allow this to happen - and you are very much in control of it.

Basically, if keyword insertion would put a word into the ad (and especially into the title) that has nothing to do with the site a user lands on when the ad is clicked, then in my opinion, that keyword has no business being in the Ad Group. Or at the very least, keyword insertion should not be used.

In my opinion, you would probably be wise to have only keywords in an Group that are highly related to what the ad offers, and what the site delivers. And you will want to use as many Ad Groups as it takes to offer the separate products or service that you have on offer, in a very targeted way.

What happens at review time? Do Google close your account or do they simply remove your ads?

What happens is entirely dependent on the specific situation, which is why every single Ad Group is reviewed by a human being. But, no, your account will not be closed.

AWA

4:56 pm on Oct 31, 2004 (gmt 0)

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At the bottom line, everything in an ad needs to be true, and it needs to be reflected on the site that our user is taken to.

If sites are using <city name> <keyword> in titles and using text that says 'local company' even when the company is thousands of miles away from <city name>, how is this accurately reflecting the truth?

If an ad appears in a <city name> <keyword> search with text stating "voted #1", but the claim is buried deep in the site and has absolutely nothing to do with the <city name>, how are Google's users helped?

I have sent feedback via my account and seen virtually nothing done about these types of deceptive ads. Would be happy to provide concrete examples via sticky mail.

11:29 pm on Nov 1, 2004 (gmt 0)

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Jon12345, I've done some tests and dynamic keyword insertion seem to work best in AdGroups that use phrases that are relevant to the title and description in the ad. My CTR's were low when I used dynamic keyword insertions for the titles in AdGroups with all broad terms but the CTR's were very high in my AdGroups using all phrases. I also use a lot of negative terms to weed out as many unwanted clicks as possible (free, clipart, pictures, gallery, etc.)
11:36 pm on Nov 1, 2004 (gmt 0)

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I find that dynamic keyword insertion works best with exact matches, then there's no problem with inappropriate wording.

Watch out for how many other advertisers seem to be using dynamic ads in your topic area. I've seen results where every ad on the front page had the same title. In such cases one would stand out better with a static ad title.

11:49 am on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

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What about when using dynamic keywords e.g. {KeyWord}?
You may get someone going to a page that does not contain what the title says.

e.g. someone types in "health soup diet" and your ad therefore says that. They go to your site but it says nothing about a soup diet. But you are targetting the keyword "health" on broadmatch.

I think you would be ill advised to use dynamic keyword insertion for ads which have broad match keywords. That would be leaving your copy content in the hands of Adwords matching software and the result would be many innappropriate, misleading and irrelevant ads.

12:35 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

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If your visitor finds themselves on a site which is not as described by the ad they're just going to click the back button. That's what I do, and I expect a high number of searchers do the same, it'll cost you for the click, but you won't get anything from it.
3:18 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

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I just had an advert disabled which was offering "Free Flights When You Buy Widgets" becuase Google couldn't find any mention of the free flights.

I'll forgive them, as the offer was only in 3 INCH BLOODY HIGH GREEN LETTERS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LANDING PAGE!

Google are generally alright about such things, this is the first time we've had any trouble.

5:27 pm on Nov 2, 2004 (gmt 0)

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I just had an advert disabled which was offering "Free Flights When You Buy Widgets" becuase Google couldn't find any mention of the free flights.

I'll forgive them, as the offer was only in 3 INCH BLOODY HIGH GREEN LETTERS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LANDING PAGE!

Google are generally alright about such things, this is the first time we've had any trouble.

Oh my.

Sweezely, sounds like we might have missed on here. As you say, we're usually pretty accurate about these things, but the occasional oversight does occur when reviewing many thousands of ads.

One quick question, based on a few 'real life experiences' I've had in the past. Are the '3 INCH BLOODY HIGH GREEN LETTERS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LANDING PAGE' part of a rotating message by any chance?

I ask because I've talked with several not-so-happy advertisers in the past who said the text we missed was right on the landing page, and then when I went to the site I wouldn't see it until I waited (and waited, and waited) for the text to rotate into view.

Just as a heads-up, the review team is working very quickly - and will not usually be able to hang around on a landing page to see if animated text will eventually come up with what they need to see in order to approve.

If your three inch text is fixed, however - well, then you have my personal apology! ;)

AWA

12:37 pm on Nov 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

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The landing page was completely static, but the ads are running now. As I said, google are pretty on the ball.