Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 3.80.6.254

Forum Moderators: ocean10000

Message Too Old, No Replies

.NET aims at the Java Competition

JUMP (Java User Migration Path) software delivered

     
12:01 am on Feb 6, 2002 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 8, 2001
posts:493
votes: 0


Microsoft's .NET (dot Net) strategy is moving into high gear with the release of the Java Language Conversion Assistant (JCLA).

C# (C sharp) is Microsoft's improved language aimed at eventually replaceing C/C++ and Java/J++ development.

The Java Language Conversion Assistant will allow developers of both non-MS Java and Microsoft J++ to easily migrate to the NET platform to deliver XML based web services.

J++.NET has been previously delivered and allows J++ to work directly with .NET. SUN sued Microsoft to stop it from developing Java and Microsoft settled.

Here's the url to the story about this new software. It is a free:
[internetnews.com...]

Are the days numbered for the Write once, Debug everywhere language Java?

Xoc

11:58 pm on Feb 7, 2002 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 18, 2001
posts:1437
votes: 0


.NET has some cool features. Type-safe languages. A web server platform that makes development easier. The ability to create web-services easily. I don't think it's a Java killer any more than IIS is an Apache killer, or Windows is a Mac killer, or IE is a Netscape killer. It will cut into the Java (especially JSP) market.

I think Java will follow the pattern of my favorite Microsoft saying:


Competing with Microsoft is like playing pinball--when you win, you get to play again.
3:51 am on Feb 8, 2002 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 8, 2001
posts:493
votes: 0


The .NET strategy is to exploit the power of industry standard XML.

Microsoft already has J++ as an altenative to Java. Java has a flaw in its approach to OOP (Object Oriented Programming).

Java support for class inheritance is limited. It forces Java to lose generality. What I mean is that if a class is to inherit from a base class, the base class must be declared
"abstract".

In large-scale applications, it is cumbersome to keep tabs on which classes have been declared "abstract" This is confusing and reduces readability. The ability to reuse code is significantly reduced.

Operator overloading is not possible for user-defined classes in Java. Garbage collecting is flawed too.

C# continues the evolution from C to C++ to Java to J++. It's designed to fulfilled real development needs and not as a Java-killer.

Witness J++.NET is in place to handle anyone's Java requirements. C# will liberate far more C, C++ and J++ developers on Windows platforms than Java developers switching from Unix.

The sun is sinking on Java. Note today that SUN is embracing LINUX for new servers to be delivered on Intel chips. While Java runs on open source Linux, Sun has pulled Java back from being part of the industy standards movement. It is proprietary and SUN has forced Microsoft from supporting it on future versions of Windows.

Here's today's article:
[biz.yahoo.com...]

The last paragraph in this article reads:
"Also today, the Financial Times reports that Sun will file (yet another) lawsuit against Microsoft for using its Windows monopoly to thwart competition from Sun's Java programming language."

Xoc

9:30 am on Feb 10, 2002 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 18, 2001
posts:1437
votes: 0


A really, really good article by Robert X. Cringley on Java vs. C#:

Microsoft's C# Language Might Be the Death of Java, but Sun's the One to Blame [pbs.org]

Sun should have maintained its technological lead, but didn't. Why not? Don't they understand that Microsoft is like the Terminator (as depicted in the original film, the really scary one) and will never give up? .NET, whatever that is, is perceived in Redmond as the future of Microsoft, and C# is the heart of .NET. Microsoft will spend whatever it takes, take as many revs as the market requires, for C# to become the dominant programming language in the world. What other high tech company can be described as being willing to behave that way right now? Would Apple, Sun, Oracle, even IBM spend WHATEVER IT TAKES to accomplish ANYTHING?
3:45 pm on Feb 10, 2002 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 13, 2001
posts:96
votes: 0


Base classes do not have to be declared abstract, Object is not declared abstract, and it's the base object for everything. Are you quoting from what you read somewhere or are you talking from experience?

The article by Robert X. Cringley strikes me as extremely biased, not that I'm saying Sun isn't screwing everything up and couldn't have done some things faster, but I disagree that java is as slow and bulky as he's implying. Still, in the end it probably won't matter and I'll have to start focusing on .NET stuff sooner or later.