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Poison Words Again - "link"

What if "link" describes a product?

     

Go60Guy

4:01 am on Mar 14, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I need to use a product name that includes the word "link". An example might be "chain link fence". In order to avoid using the word "link" perhaps I could use a tortured description like this:

"...a fence manufactured using stiffened interwoven metallic wire strands..."

I guess this brings up the question of how ridiculous must we become.

digitalghost

4:22 am on Mar 14, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I have pages ranking #1 that contain the word link in the title and headers.

Based on the description, that could be chicken wire fencing or barbed wire fence.

You could use hurricane fence but then you get the weather seekers... I think I would go with chain link fence. Besides, I think vines are a requirement of hurricane fences. ;)

DG

papabaer

3:09 pm on Mar 21, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



This is a very important issue: Are we to avoid identifying a product or service by its proper name simply because that name contains a "poison" word?

This is where, I hope, the algos are written to weigh the actual content before penalising a site or page unjustly.

... I don't want to be forced to type "chain links, not spam" into the search box next time I am looking to relpace a section of fencing!

And let's not forget sausage links.... hmmmm, it IS breakfast time!

starec

3:34 pm on Mar 21, 2002 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I guess this brings up the question of how ridiculous must we become.

Couldn't agree more. Just use the normal product name or the name people use when they search for the product.

Put it online, link it, register it with relevant directories, submit to SEs and wait.

I find the whole concept of avoiding natural keywords and targeting entire websites to some current algo peculiarity rather shortsighted.

SEs get smarter every day... They will soon be able differentiate between jaguar and Jaguar.

If I were you I would start with the common sense approach and worry about the poison words only if the common sense approach does not work.

Filipe

10:49 pm on Apr 29, 2002 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Good summation, starec. People should be less anal-retentive about SEO, and more interested in content. Search Engine Optimization isn't a matter of tricking search engines, it's a matter of wisely using what you have to get the maximum return possible. Not everyone can get #1 or even #20 positions. Work on making your content worthwhile, and you'll get the returns you deserve.

JamesR

11:09 pm on Apr 29, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I really think you will be OK,
79.4 million sites [google.com] can't be wrong.

JayC

12:33 am on Apr 30, 2002 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Even if is true that "link" is a "poison word" -- so what? Presumably all of your competitors in the chain link fence business have to use it too, and your best potential customers will be searching on that exact phrase.

Even if it's true that the presence of the "poison word" would degrade your serp position somewhat, that position would be relative to all of the other pages that met that query... all of which would carry the same "poison word."

europeforvisitors

2:08 am on Apr 30, 2002 (gmt 0)



And don't forget that some people will spell it "chainlink" (one word), which returns a different set of results.

Filipe

6:47 pm on May 15, 2002 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



If you ask me, poison words don't even exist. Or at least shouldn't be a concern for legitimate sites.
 

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