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make a photo shades of one colour

so every colour in a photo is a shade of blue

     
3:25 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Photoshop 7 is going to be the death of me - its driving me up the wall - so damn complex.

I am trying to make a photograph all blue, in such a way that the darkest shade is a specific shade of blue and every other colour is simply a lighter shade of the blue colour i specified.

If you need to see an example of what I am talking about - I can stickymail you a url showing exactly what I am looking for.

Any ideas would be about the best thing that could happen to me all week.

3:33 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Have you tried image/ajustments/channel mixer?
3:34 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Have you tried hue/saturation and clicked colorize then adjust to your liking?
3:36 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Got it- image/ajustments/channel mixer and then pick "output channel blue". Whack the dials up to 200% one by one and it should all be shades of blue.

<edit> the colourise option in hue/saturation actually works better for this</edit>

3:41 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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thanks for your help - appreciate it -

i need to able to specify the darkest shade of blue. Can't do that using the channel mixer - unless I have missed something.

hue/sat does look like the option actually - but how would I approximate to the correct blue - could take all day using trial and error.

3:44 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I like hue/saturation. The trick is, that on your floating bar that has the foreground and background color, you must first change the foreground color to the shade of blue you require.

Then go to the top pull-down menu: Image-Adjust-Hue/Saturation and press the little button that says, "Colorize."

Of course, another method is to create a layer over the layer you want to colorize, then fill it with the color you want. Then, play with the blending modes (on your floating palette (not to be confused with the floating bar), it's in the tab that says Layers, and is usually defaulted at Normal) Try using screen, or overlay, all the while playing around with the Opacity scale.

This can get really fun. I've literally spent hours discovering new images and effects by layering color on color, layer on layer.

4:15 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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> I like hue/saturation. The trick is, that on your floating bar that has the foreground and background color, you must first change the foreground color to the shade of blue you require.
Then go to the top pull-down menu: Image-Adjust-Hue/Saturation and press the little button that says, "Colorize."

thanks - tried this and no luck - just doesn't match the foreground colour. the sliders (hue, sat, light) seem to stay where they were the last time i messed around with them - can they be reset or something?

4:43 pm on Feb 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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The colorize option in hue/saturation usually does the trick for me, but if you're trying to match a certain color perfectly it can be tricky. An easier way to do it might be to convert the image to greyscale (image>mode>greyscale) you'll then need to convert it back to RGB or CMYK (in the same menu). Then create a new layer, completely fill it with the color you're trying to get and adjust the layer opacity. You may need to adjust the contrast of the bottom layer using curves or levels to get the right level of contrast.
10:02 am on Feb 22, 2003 (gmt 0)

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And don't forget about your layer options, such as overlay, saturation, percentage of transparency, etc. These can dramatically affect your color choices once you've "colorized" an image. The neat thing is, you can toy around with the effects to see what's going to work best on the particular background color you want to place the image on. It can take your colorization to the nth degree.
1:54 pm on Feb 22, 2003 (gmt 0)

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If I understand your problem correctly, this should work:
- Open the image
- Convert image to greyscale
- Convert image back to RGB
- Double click on Bckground in the Layer Palette to make the background into a Layer (Layer 0)
- Create a New Layer (Layer 1) and drag this one underneath Layer 0
- Fill Layer 1 with the desired color
- Switch Layer Mode on Layer 0 to ´Bleach´

To have more of your base color shine through and have less lighter areas, simply apply some Levels-changes on Layer 0.

If that won´t do the trick, Stickymail me that URL... :)

Woz

3:39 pm on Feb 22, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I have no idea how to do this in Photoshop, but a neat trick is to

1) invert the colours
2) generate sepia tone
3) invert back

viola - all Blue.

onya
Woz

5:28 pm on Feb 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I don't have Photoshop 7 however in photoshop 6 click Image , adjust, desaturate
Next click image adjust variations this allows you to choose your Sepia tone colors.