Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.90.204.233

Forum Moderators: LifeinAsia

Message Too Old, No Replies

Broadband expanding in the US

Over 6.4 Million Broadband Subscribers Added in 2002

     
9:51 am on Apr 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Sept 16, 2001
posts:2059
votes: 0

12:24 pm on Apr 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 22, 2002
posts:2546
votes: 0


I'm happy to say I am part of those statistics. Whew, dial-up was bad.

Tor

12:32 pm on Apr 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 31, 2000
posts:786
votes: 0


That`s a 58% increase in just one year if my calculations are correct...(?)
1:23 pm on Apr 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lorax is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 31, 2002
posts:7577
votes: 4


I am part of the Broadband (cable) stats myself but I'd rather not be. If I could find an equitable solution other than cable I would as it is more of a pain here in our mostly rural state. But for now it is the best solution I have available. But ditching dial-up was definately a major improvement in my quality of life. :)
7:42 pm on Apr 4, 2003 (gmt 0)

New User

10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 31, 2003
posts:31
votes: 0


I don't see how people can surf the net these days without broadband. Dial-up users don't have much of a problem with well designed, informational sites, but the vast majority of sites are not well designed and have flash apps., many images, streaming, etc.

I am part of the Broadband (cable) stats myself but I'd rather not be.

I know that in theory DSL is better than cable, but I miss my cable modem. I had cable from May 2000 to February 2002, it was never down once. Amazing. I've had DSL since I moved, it's down 2 or 3 times a month.

3:32 am on Apr 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 5, 2003
posts:133
votes: 0


56K (more like 49K) dialup, and will be for a while. I don't mind the monthly fees, I just don't want to pay $100 for installation for a cable/DSL/128K ISDN line. I know it's petty, but... :)

I use either IE5 (with heightened security settings, no java, no flash, no active scripting, et al) or Lynx as a browser, and make a point of avoiding sites full of scripting, flash animations, etc. If I can't read it in Lynx on my Sparc IPC, I don't want to read it at all... though I will, occasionally, make an exception for .pdf files, but that's it.

Yeah, a faster connection would be nice if I did stuff like download MP3's, or listen to streaming music, but when I mostly read email/news and upload new pages to my sites (and the average page size for all my sites is just over 6Kb), 56K is fine... For a week, after the power supply on my PC failed, I connected to the internet every day as usual using a 286-33 I dug out of a closet as a terminal for the Sparc, and connecting with an external 14.4k modem on the Sparcstation. (No PPP support in the software (telix) on the old 286, or I would have just used that) It wasn't too bad, in Lynx, but I wouldn't necessarily want to do it every day.

<ot>I love sparcstations. :)</ot>

4:00 am on Apr 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tedster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:May 26, 2000
posts:37301
votes: 0


I'm still waiting for some service to realize that their are people who want a fat UPLOAD possibility, and not just a speedy download.

Probably a few years in the future, I guess.

5:00 am on Apr 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member chiyo is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:June 21, 2000
posts:3170
votes: 0


OK, just to give a different view. We have a relatively slow broadband connection at the office but 96% of the time I do all my work on a laptop from slow dial up connections (read a real rate of around 2000 to 3300 bps - yep it sometimes takes 10 seconds to download a 20 kb file or graphic) in hotels in South East Asian capital cities. Broadband is just not an option, or if it is, an afforable option for mobile users like me, as well as 95% of the international web population.

I dont feel that broadband is absolutely necessary, (though it would be "nice"), even for someone like me who is on the Web directly 4 to 6 hours a day. You learn to do multi-task (download emails or files while designing web pages, browse WebmasterWorld while uploading new pages etc) You also learn to turn off images when you into heavy duty browsing, or use text only or light versions of websites like news.google. You learn to not waste time by downloading music files or watch news in audio or video. You learn very little extra from these.

Most importantly when i go back to the office for a few days on broadband I realise im not missing much at all. Basically I have not yet seen a "useful" site (as opposed to a brochure ware, artistic site or sites full of advertising, sktscraper ads etc like MSNBC etc.) that is significantly easier to use and worth the extra money for the connection on broadband.

There are many people like me. There is also a tendency for people on hi speed broadband to assume that all people that matter for their business are also on hi speed connections. So you miss the experience of browsing your site at the speed 95% of the world does. People like me dont complain; we just never visit bulky sites again, hit the back button, and visit the always available low bandwidth alternative sites that are often much better in terms of finding info, and sometimes even looks.

That said, broadband is certainly on the rise in the US, and is almost 100% established in homes and workplaces in Seoul and Tokyo for example, but so also is accessing the Web though mobile devices at very slow speeds. I know of a lot of CEO's and key managers that are using dial up connections on laptops in hotels and increasingly mobile phone and pda connections for 95% of the time. Thats a segment that you dont want to lose.

1:39 pm on Apr 7, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lorax is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 31, 2002
posts:7577
votes: 4


I know that in theory DSL is better than cable...

I'm thinking more along the lines of fractional T or a Frame. My cable has been anything but reliable. I can tell when school's out because the connection slows to a crawl. All of the kids at home checking email and getting online to play games while waiting for mom to get home and cook supper. Not to mention it's almost a guarentee I'll be disconnected for several hours at least once a month. It's a pain.

Re: speed. With the volume of uploads and downloads I do, the extra few seconds adds up. Ok, maybe I'm just impatient - but I'm willing to pay for it rather than just bitch. ;)

6:56 pm on Apr 7, 2003 (gmt 0)

New User

10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 31, 2003
posts:31
votes: 0


Yes, that's the flip side of cable service - it's shared. Cable or DSL, no matter which way you go, will have their pros and cons. It's probably going to take awhile for these services to meet our expectations.
7:24 pm on Apr 7, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Sept 12, 2002
posts:885
votes: 0


people who want a fat UPLOAD possibility

Hear, hear! Why does my ISP think I'm paying for a /29 and a TOS that allows servers, yet will be happy with an upload speed that is approximately 0.17 x my download speed? I don't need fixed IPs and Apache to run Napster/Kazaa/AudioGalaxy/p2p-fad-of-the-week.

And yes, I asked for SDSL. Explicitly. They don't sell it, so I must not want it, and is there anything else they can do for me today?

Still, my pages are really light-weight, and when I need real server capacity I'll host outside of the house. As an end user, a fat DSL connection is great - I've got better real connectivity now than I did in college, where about 1.2k people were sharing a T-1 and about 1k of those were running Napster.