Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 3.226.251.205

Forum Moderators: LifeinAsia

Message Too Old, No Replies

how to check on a hosting company

Track records needed

     
3:28 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

New User

10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 16, 2002
posts:39
votes: 0


I just signed up with a hosting company but their billing requirements have made me do a double-take. I have heard mention of independent sites that offer track records for such businesses. Can anyone clue me in to where to find such a site?

Thanks-

3:30 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:May 29, 2002
posts:1819
votes: 0


There are quite a few sites that offer reviews but most seem to have some obvious and others hidden affiliations.

What do you mean that the billing requirements worry you?

4:04 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 3, 2003
posts:83
votes: 0


Don't know about independent sites but if you want to know about hosting companies try a google search for 'Web hosting talk'.
4:41 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

New User

10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 16, 2002
posts:39
votes: 0


The hosting site that I chose was asking for a copy of the credit card to be faxed to them as well as a copy of my photo ID. I called their billing department and the guy I spoke to waved that requirement in liu of a voice confirmation. It just seemed wierd to me that they would ask me to fax them this kind of info. I for one do not want a copy of the front and back of my credit card flying around somewhere.
4:56 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 3, 2003
posts:83
votes: 0


The photocopy of the credit card seems a bit weird.

I've been asked for proof of ID to be sent before.

5:12 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 26, 2001
posts:762
votes: 0


Proof of ID is required often in any industry that has a large percentage of chargebacks, I imagine.

It seeems requiring proof of having the card could be taken 2 ways: Security gets an extra step, or "ain't no way I'm faxing both!"

I'm not sure which camp I fall into.

5:19 pm on Feb 26, 2003 (gmt 0)

New User

10+ Year Member

joined:Dec 16, 2002
posts:39
votes: 0


I guess I was expecting the same type of service I would with any online transaction. Amazon does not require you to fax them a copy of your Drivers License and credit card. I have no problem with providing the 7-digit code from the back of the card but faxing the actual card seemed very strange to me. Then to have the customer service rep say forget about it when I called to inquire... This is what I get for trying to find a "cheeper" solution. Anyone with a server can offer hosting right? I am pretty confident but maybe I am just being naive.
9:56 am on Feb 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 26, 2001
posts:1076
votes: 0


That company is asking for a copy of the card as a security check - it's to ensure you are the genuine cardholder and that you haven't simply picked up the card number and owner details from another web site or hacker list etc. They shouldn't really be asking for a copy of your card - just don't send it. They should really be using a payment processor with AVS and CVV instead.

There is a difference between web hosts and sites like Amazon etc. Amazon etc sell tangible products - they are sent to a physical postal address - the cardholder's address. Goods can be traced and possibly recovered. If the cardholder didn't order the goods they can return them. NOTE - most fraudulent orders for tangible goods are sent to addresses other than the cardholder's address (ie, retailer asks for separate billing and shipping addresses) so these orders will normally be lost.

Web hosts provide a service - it's all online, and no means of tracing anything to a cardholder. Sometimes they want to take extra precautions.

My advice is never send a copy of your card - you never know where it'll end up. Just find another host.

6:30 pm on Feb 28, 2003 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 5, 2003
posts:133
votes: 0


I always like to see how long a company has been in business, so I check archive.org, and google groups for the earliest mention of their name, as well as any spam reports from them (news.admin.net-abuse.sightings). Run their name/ip's through all the DNSBL's, check the better business bureau... Check ATW or Google for links to them - odds are good a few customers will be linking to them "web hosting provided by WidgetHost" or similar.
5:00 am on Mar 1, 2003 (gmt 0)

Junior Member

joined:Mar 29, 2002
posts:107
votes: 0


Asking for ID not a bad idea… After all don’t you show it at the store when you purchase something with your credit card?

I don't think that is strange at all, for us we have gone from 1 to 10 fraudulent orders per month. We normally call to confirm the orders. Calling usually works great for a confirmation, however recently I spoke with the gent who was running card numbers. He was busted clean and simple - local authorities were informed to make a long story short.

Credit Card fraud is very common for hosting companies or at least with the other professionals I have spoke with. I think there is a need to contend with fraud. A simple phone confirmation means does not really offer total security against fraud - especially if it is the yahoo who is running random cards. Asking for an ID is going to do it pretty good I think.

If someone wants to check a businesses establishment you can always look them up through their state business register online.

You can also run credit history on a business with D&B [dnb.com...] for a few bucks!

Cheers!

 

Join The Conversation

Moderators and Top Contributors

Hot Threads This Week

Featured Threads

Free SEO Tools

Hire Expert Members