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Google now a domain registrar

What are they planning for '05?

     
4:01 am on Feb 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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With Google now a registrar, what kind of impact will this have on the many domain registration companies? It could be interesting as most of them are *customers* of Google.

Google email, Google hosting, Google domains, Google Adwords, Froogle for product placement - sounds like a nice small business solution.

Link to the registrar list at iana.org

[iana.org...]

Google is #895

2:59 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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>>I remebmer GG saying that the did not look at whois data becasue it was just not cost effective. This may make it cost effective <<
I am with ogletree on this.I might be paranoid but methinks they are after the full list of zone files as well as access to whois data.
Either that or they are going to try to snap some nice expired domains.;)
3:35 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Could simply be for internal security - if you are your own registrar it's going to be that much harder to hijack domains off you (if you have competent people in charge of the security side of things) since you can auto-reject ALL outgoing transfer attempts safe in the knowledge that you would NEVER move your domains away from yourself...

And while the new ICANN rules on preventing outgoing transfers might have some bearing on this, the excuse "we know we didn't request the transfer because we're an ICANN-accredited registrar ourselves so that would be a quite ludicrous thing to do" probably would carry the battle in any dispute situation.

5:18 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Its a profitable business venture, all conspiracy theories aside. Google would be strong competition right away.

[msnbc.msn.com...]

Bob Parsons, founder and president of GoDaddy.com, which will kick off a $19 million national marketing campaign in the first quarter of Sunday’s game.

“It’s not a gamble,” said Parsons, who is the sole stockholder in GoDaddy, an Internet domain registrar.

“We have been the leader in our market for three years,” he said. “If this year’s marketing budget does not produce one dollar in additional sales, we’ll still throw off $14 million in cash. I’ll still be supersizing it at McDonald’s.”

7:26 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Getting closer and closer to a full-service portal type site, aren't they.

The thought has been on my mind even in most recent months.

Is anyone ever so slightly nervous about this?

Do you even have to ask? Just let your imagination go with it..

It will be interesting to watch G this next year…

8:14 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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...even though I don't like them having access to so much info...

So, how do you think they want to succeed in their quest to provide best posiible access to all available data online?

9:05 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I might be paranoid but methinks they are after the full list of zone files as well as access to whois data.
Either that or they are going to try to snap some nice expired domains.
The zone access to all the domains in com/net/org/biz/info/name etc is free. The Whois data is sold in bulk by some registrars and Google would well be able to afford it. However the quality of Whois data is not uniform and in some cases it is wrong.

Regards...jmcc

9:52 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The money to be made from selling domain registrations comes from add-ons such as web hosting or web design.

Google starting a search engine friendly web design company? :)

10:21 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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msg #15:

>> idol speculation

Yes, that just about sums it up :)

10:49 am on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Just on the zonefiles aspect - the fact that Google is a registrar gives them access more data than is in the zonefiles. This would tend to indicate that it may be looking at registry services rather than an enhancement of its current website acquisition strategy. The registrar status does not, however, give them access to the ccTLD zonefiles, only to com/net/org/biz/info/name zones.

However to become a significant player in the domains registration market, Google would have to take over one of the smaller multi-million domains registrars or grow organically. The long term integration of domains/whois data from its registry operations with website acquisition and detection would improve Google's local search accuracy if it enforces the same kind of sign-up criteria that it uses with Google Adsense.

Regards...jmcc

2:32 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Just found this

"Google has become a domain name registrar to learn more about the Internet's domain name system," a Google spokesperson said in a statement. "While we have no plans to register domains at this time, we believe this information can help us increase the quality of our search results."

at

[eweek.com...]

In other words, they will add some sort of filter to the search results, perhaps based on location/country of registrant

2:39 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Hmm . . . almost 2,000 PhDs and they need to learn more about the Internet's domain name system! :o
5:29 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Hmm . . . almost 2,000 PhDs and they need to learn more about the Internet's domain name system! shocked

Exactly! So what can they learn about the Internet's domain name system that they didn't know before? That is what will affect us...

5:48 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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> google will get contact info.

They ALREADY have that with existing registrar agreements. So does Inktomi/Yahoo. They have had the zone files for years.
Even as a Registrar, they can not get to anything that isn't already public on the whois.

6:37 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I bow before your superior knowledge on this Jmcc but to me it still smells like they are going after whois info and better handling of expired domains.
I am pretty dumb when it comes to things like this but whats to stop them organising the whois data and have every domain across all registrars that are attributed to the one contact handle.?
Also at the moment google are far from perfect on their expired domain squashing, especially with a couple of the tlds, can't this registrar status help them in anyway with better acess to expiry dates and registration dates?
11:56 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

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This won't give them access to hidden registrations. But it will allow them to vet domains registered through them for sure.

I suspect that Google pores over Yahoo's financials and will enter any business that Yahoo makes money in as well as determine any angles they can attack that Yahoo does not make money.

Yahoo has sold domains for years (although I never heard for sure if they are registrars or reselling).

12:29 am on Feb 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Hey Clark...

What do you mean by hidden registrations...is that the same as private ("unlisted") registration?

Any suggestions on a service that is cheaper than godaddy?

12:55 am on Feb 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

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This strikes me as a conflict of interest, as I can see the unconstrained G$ penalizing sites in SERPS that are not registered with it. Oh sure, they'll send out one of their numerous lying press releases about how they supposedly wouldn't do that -- but their algo will still be tweaked to do it anyway.

Everything G$ does is about excess-market-profit (e.g., off-topic and affiliate AW ads allowed) and privacy invasion (e.g., G$ toolbar watching your every move), so I see this action as a means by which G$ seeks to gain more access to WHOIS contact info and to continue to manipulate their obviously-dishonest "natural" SERPs to not only blackmail sites into AW, but even to blackmail them into now also registering with G$.

In the same vein, maybe Y! and M$ should "sandbox" any site registered with G$! ;)

1:10 am on Feb 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

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qur1ous, yes, unlisted registrations. This is data hidden by the registrar so you don't have your email spammed.

As for registrars, no idea. I'm willing to pay couple bucks more for a good interface. Registerfly works for me so why mess with something good?

I never used godaddy. Didn't they have some scandal recently in a long WW thread?

5:11 am on Feb 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Just a note that our Forum Charter [webmasterworld.com] does not allow recommendation of specific registrars. Many registrars are members here - you wouldn't be able to tell the promotion from the honest recommendation.
4:17 am on Feb 4, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Sorry, please delete any mention of a specific company in my post if possible. (I thought mentioning the big ones were safe. If at this point a major registrar is trying to get traffic from a forum that doesn't allow links, they got big problems, but I do understand and respect the charter.)

Anyway, back to the thread. I keep thinking that foremost in Google's mind is finding a way to vet domains and associate multiple domains with the owner. And that this is likely connected to the registrar idea.

Can you imagine if Google would offer a new program, telling all website owners, for $5.00 on your credit card, you can sign up for an account on Google. From there Google will give you a special file to add to your site (or even a line to add to your robots.txt). Through AVS they can verify you are one person. You can use that code on as many sites as you want. Then Google knows you control that site. If you do interlinking, it can reduce PR to your own sites. Prevent registering 5000 domains at a time. And give you a bump in the rankings if you're part of their program.

In the current environment when they keep trying to play unbiased, I don't see them doing this, but one day, yes. It could allow them to go back to PR again somewhat.

3:39 pm on Feb 4, 2005 (gmt 0)

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There's an interesting bit of speculation [news.netcraft.com] about this on Netcraft, complete with unnamed sources et al.

As a registrar, Google would be able to negotiate access to a centralized list of expiring and resold domains (known as the "batch pool"), and then know when to reset PageRank on a domain that has changed hands. The site would then have earn its position in Google's rankings, rather than inheriting the "Googlejuice" of the previous owner.

This could have a nasty effect on the value of domains for re-sale.

But, before anyone goes off the handle, read the whole article. It's an interesting piece of speculation. Keep in mind, it's only speculation at this point.

4:21 pm on Feb 4, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Wow, I'll bet that PR reset is going to happen. They must hate buying of domains for PR.

I wonder how long before GoDaddy or someone sets up a proxy ownership system to hide ownership changes? Or is that even possible within the rules?

3:38 am on Feb 6, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Google's response is that this will save them thousands in fees for new and existing domains they buy. Seems a lot of loops to jump through to simply save a few thousand dollars. I would assume this explanation is a bold faced lie.

The real news is their access to the internal date of domains. Besides seeing domains that expire and transfer, they have the ability to spot networks much easier.

I was under the impression that Whois info was strictly for information, not other purposes. I'm surprised an organization like ICANN would accept a company like Google who has disobeyed that rule over time.



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