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parked domains and 301 redirect

     

quantum

6:34 pm on Dec 15, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Hi

There was an old post talking about having multiple domains (.com, .net, .org) but all pointing to the same content with .com the main domain.

The reply was the general rule of never having the same content on more than one domain. A 301 redirect should be used on the extra domains to point to the main domain.

I have a .com and .co.uk with the content on .com and .co.uk as a parked domain.

My question is whether a 301 redirect is the same thing as a parked domain in cpanel? If not how would I go about setting up the 301 redirect?

trees

3:09 pm on Dec 17, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



We would also be interested in seeing a reply to this question.

At the same time, it would be appreciated if someone could provide a qualified source for this statement:

the general rule of never having the same content on more than one domain

[edited by: engine at 11:15 am (utc) on Jan. 14, 2005]
[edit reason] formatting [/edit]

tedster

7:19 pm on Dec 17, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tedster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



Google guidelines [google.com]

Don't create multiple pages, subdomains, or
domains with substantially duplicate content.

A 301 redirect is set up on the server - so it's different for IIS and Apache. You'll find a lot of information in our Apache and Microsoft forums about this.

trees

4:22 pm on Dec 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



On another thread it recommends using 302 Redirect but does not explain the option of using 301 Redirect. Combined with the vaguely worked Google policy (quoted above) this is all very confusing! 8-X

[edited by: engine at 11:16 am (utc) on Jan. 14, 2005]
[edit reason] formatting [/edit]

mcavic

5:39 pm on Dec 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



A 301 redirect means a permanent move, and 302 means temporary.

The 302 is pretty useless, and not handled the way you'd like by most engines. However, the 302 is the default that you get in some languages if you don't explicitly specify a 301.

Generally speaking, a parked domain is just pointed at some page, not necessarily redirected. You can use this tool [webmasterworld.com] to find out if it's using a 301 or 302 redirect.

trees

11:35 am on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Thank you for the detailed reply and very useful link Matt, much appreciated.

Please could you provide a little more information? Specifically, what is the difference between a "normal" domain name page which displays index.html and a "parked" domain name page which displays index.html?

[edited by: engine at 11:16 am (utc) on Jan. 14, 2005]
[edit reason] formatting [/edit]

mcavic

5:10 pm on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Based on my understanding of the terminology, there's no *technological* difference between a normal page and a parked page.

But parking a domain indicates that you're temporarily pointing the domain to a skeleton site, like an under construction page.

I think GoDaddy talks about "unparking" your page in order to point it to a live site, because the parking page is their standard Under Construction thing.

The important distinction is between pointing (which is a registry and DNS issue), and redirecting, which is a function of the Web server.

trees

9:30 pm on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



We 100% agree with and accept those definitions, Matt. For the record, we'd enjoy seeing an Internet with less unnecessary jargon used wherever possible.

Getting back to the topic as per, could you possibly elaborate on how a "301 Permanent Redirect" is perceived as preferable to a "302 Temporary Redirect"? Doubtless there are better examples, but EPINIONS.COM and EOPINIONS.COM spring readily to mind (see [webmasterworld.com...] )

Based on my understanding of the terminology, there's no *technological* difference between a normal page and a parked page.

But parking a domain indicates that you're temporarily pointing the domain to a skeleton site, like an under construction page.

I think GoDaddy talks about "unparking" your page in order to point it to a live site, because the parking page is their standard Under Construction thing.

The important distinction is between pointing (which is a registry and DNS issue), and redirecting, which is a function of the Web server.

[edited by: engine at 11:17 am (utc) on Jan. 14, 2005]
[edit reason] formatting [/edit]

 

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