Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.162.152.232

Forum Moderators: buckworks

Message Too Old, No Replies

look-to-buy ratio

     
5:41 pm on Sep 18, 2000 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rcjordan is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 22, 2000
posts:9138
votes: 0


the article [internetvcwatch.com] isn't particulary noteworthy, except it did confirm the ''look-to-buy'' (conversion) ratio:
the average look-to-buy ratio of 50-to-1 for e-commerce sites

Doing the math, if a banner has .008 CTR, then the ''banner-to-buy'' ratio is .00016, or approximately 3 sales for every 20,000 banners. Obviously, this ratio is likely to vary quite a bit in certain product categories, but I found it to be true in household leisure products.

8:23 am on Sept 21, 2000 (gmt 0)

Administrator from US 

WebmasterWorld Administrator brett_tabke is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Sept 21, 1999
posts:38074
votes: 17


Ok, what *is* a household leisure product?

(be nice)

2:10 pm on Sept 21, 2000 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member rcjordan is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 22, 2000
posts:9138
votes: 0


Hammock, rope chair, swings... goes under the industry moniker of 'leisure furniture' or somesuch. Others would be those that sell Sharper-Image type goodies, stainless-steel barbeque grills, weird swimming pool 'accessories' (for lack of a better term, have you seen all the junk they sell to go around a pool?). You get the idea.
11:08 pm on Sept 25, 2000 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:July 6, 2000
posts:904
votes: 0


Hmmm, I wonder about that 50-1 ratio. One of my sites has approx 35-1, but the one that generates the (vast) bulk of revenue is closer to 300-1. Both sites use similar design and underlying programming, but the 300-1 site has much more non-sales content to attract visitors - over 50% of the site is free content rather than sales pitches.

I am happy with my main site's conversion ratio, but would like to hear other's experiences - maybe I'm blissfully ignorant and should be aiming for much higher?

1:06 am on Sept 26, 2000 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tedster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:May 26, 2000
posts:37301
votes: 0


I have a friend who teaches e-commerce at Penn State. Her main thesis is that most web sales happen in the course of looking for information, often in an unplanned for manner -- at present, "Going shopping" doesn't mean "logging in" for most households.

I definitely see this at work on my client sites. Lots of information on a site means a lower look-to-buy ratio, but higher actual dollar sales. And after all, you can only put dollars in the bank, not percentages.

Right now we have 4 ecommerce clients. We see more like 100 to 1 ratios on established sites -- sites that are getting a lot of return traffic. When they were brand new sites it was more like 300 or even 500 to 1. So my experience also says that 50 to 1 is not anywhere near a rule of thumb. Too many variables, including what industry and what price point.

 

Join The Conversation

Moderators and Top Contributors

Hot Threads This Week

Featured Threads

Free SEO Tools

Hire Expert Members